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Vice Media pushes back on WSJ report of plan for 'substantial layoffs' | TheHill – The Hill

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Vice Media is pushing back at a report Tuesday in the Wall Street Journal that said Vice Media Group has a plan for “substantial layoffs” at its company websites amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The Journal obtained what it described as “a planning document,” which calls for layoffs of 300 Vice employees in its digital operations unit, which includes both Vice News and Refinery29 — an online publication that focuses on women.

According to the Journal, the cuts would save $40 million, but could also lead to a 30 percent drop in digital traffic due to falling content.

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A Vice Media Group spokesperson tells The Hill that the plan has not been “vetted or endorsed” by Vice Media Group and that no decisions at the company have been made.

“The leaked information obtained by the WSJ has not been vetted or endorsed as a plan by VICE Media Group. This information also does not reflect VMG standard global reporting metrics and while all media companies are taking steps to plan for precautionary measures during COVID-19, no decisions at VMG have been made,” a Vice spokesman told The Hill in an email.

Vice was reportedly struggling to meet revenue expectations in recent years before the pandemic struck.

In February 2019, Vice Media laid off approximately 250 workers in cuts that included its television production studios and news department. Last week, Vox Media announced it was furloughing 100 employees in an attempt to avoid layoffs.

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Changes being made to Saskatchewan print media as focus shifts online – Global News

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Both the Leader-Post and The Star Phoenix will not be printing a Monday copy of the paper starting on June 22nd.

The media outlets will move to a digital-only edition and will produce the printed edition Tuesday through Sunday.


READ MORE:
‘We’re back’: new Saskatoon community paper hits newsstands next week

Mark Taylor, the head of the school of journalism department at the University of Regina says, this change is not a surprising one.

“I think it’s part of a gradual shift that we are seeing lots of other newspapers doing and if this works and goes over without too many problems, it might be Tuesday, Wednesday, until eventually the paper is completely online,” Taylor said.

Readers will have access to the online version, which is the exact same version as the printed one.

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Taylor added that the papers might see some push back from the older demographic of readers who are not online.


READ MORE:
LISTEN: The future of print media and journalism in the digital age

“I feel for the people like my parents and I think a lot of older readers who get the hard copy,” Taylor said.

“They always have and they might not be real web-savvy and they don’t want to get their news online.”

There will be no change in the subscription price.






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Lacombe Globe set to print newspaper’s final edition


Lacombe Globe set to print newspaper’s final edition

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Chad Brownlee apologizes over social media post depicting conspiracy theory – CBC.ca

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Canadian country singer Chad Brownlee has apologized after posting a conspiracy theory image criticized as racist and antisemitic on his social media accounts.

The musician from British Columbia issued the original post on Tuesday and then deleted it, however some social media users captured a screen grab of it.

The manipulated image depicts Jewish-American billionaire philanthropist George Soros with a chess board and pieces made up of protesters and the COVID-19 molecule.

Soros has been the target of many right-wing conspiracy theories, including claims he’s funding anti-fascist activists in the protests against racism and police brutality in the United States.

Reacting to social media anger over the post, Brownlee wrote on his Twitter and Instagram accounts that he apologizes for sharing an image “that was wrong, inappropriate and could be perceived as racist.”

He added his “intention in posting the image was nothing of the sort,” although he acknowledges “how people could easily have seen it that way.”

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Tyler Babiy fosters connections and community through social media – Saskatoon StarPhoenix

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Depending on your outlook, connecting through social media can be as interactive or isolated as each user prefers.

For Tyler Babiy, that choice is easy. Interacting with local creators and other like-minded people is the focus of his business, Social Made Local.

It originally started out as a T-shirt brand — an offshoot of his other business, T Squared Social. Since then, it has also fostered a community of like-minded, local creatives looking to connect, collaborate and share their creativity.

“With this T-shirt company I could just try to instil a sense of social responsibility in terms of taking ownership of the things you create,” Babiy says.

“It’s really cool to offer (creators) a space to have a voice and be heard — but to also plant that seed of consciousness in people that the things that we do on social media are not private and they can deeply affect the people around us in ways we don’t even know … so it’s just planting that idea that you’re not just throwing things into the wind.”

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