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Visitors get a shot at ‘lost arts’ at Park Homstead

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Raiders of the lost arts came to John R. Park Homestead Sunday as artisans of many talents came together for the day to demonstrate old-time hobbies and crafts.

The annual Lost Arts Festival brings together more than 20 demonstrations, including tin-smithing, blacksmithing, wood carving, butter making, candle dipping, weaving, spinning and stained glass, among others, said Kris Ives, curator education coordinator for Essex Region Conservation Authority.

“We spend a lot of our time providing events and education programs that talk about the human and natural history of Essex region, and where those intersect,” Ives said. “The Lost Arts Festival is meant to inspire people to unplug, to explore arts and crafts, to meet other people doing cool hobbies.

“Just a celebration of all these incredible skills that I think people don’t realize might be here in Windsor-Essex.”

Homestead
Dale Smart, of the Lake St. Clair Voyageurs History Club based in Michigan, helps Julia Daniels make wooden buttons while Annabelle Daniels looks on during the Lost Arts Festival at John R. Park Homestead Sunday, August 13, 2023. Photo by BRIAN MACLEOD/WINDSOR STAR) /jpg

The 1842 Park family home, built in Classical Revival Style, is set to undergo a significant restoration effort to repair years of damage from storms blowing in off Lake Erie.

The next event is a Harvest and Horses festival planned for Oct. 1.

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‘Duck man!’ ‘Duck man!’ A look inside the world of unsanctioned art in self-serious Toronto – Toronto Star

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‘Duck man!’ ‘Duck man!’ A look inside the world of unsanctioned art in self-serious Toronto  Toronto Star

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Ehiko: The Multidisciplinary Artist Shaping Decolonization Through Art

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Ehiko, a multidisciplinary artist born in Lagos, Nigeria, now calls Toronto, Ontario, her home. An OCAD University graduate, she has gained recognition for her powerful and evocative works that delve into the complexities of decolonization, health and wellness, spirituality, sexual violence, and the representation of melanated hair.

Ehiko’s artistic journey began in the vibrant city of Lagos, where the rich cultural heritage and traditional artistry influenced her deeply. This foundation blossomed in Toronto, where she continued to experiment and manipulate raw canvas due to its flexibility. Her expressive palette and the use of various textiles pay homage to traditional Nigerian craftsmanship, creating a unique blend of contemporary and ancestral art forms.

Her works are not just visually striking but also laden with profound messages. Ehiko’s exploration of decolonization is evident in her large-scale multi-medium paintings, performances, drawings, and installations. Each piece she creates is a testament to her commitment to unravelling spirituality linked to traditional Afrakan masks, presenting a dialogue between the past and present.

One of the central themes in Ehiko’s work is health and wellness, particularly within the context of the Black community. She addresses the often-overlooked aspects of mental health and the importance of wellness practices rooted in African traditions. Through her art, Ehiko encourages a reconnection with these practices, promoting healing and resilience.

Sexual violence is another critical subject Ehiko tackles with sensitivity and boldness. Her works often depict the pain and trauma associated with such experiences while also highlighting the strength and resilience of survivors. By bringing these issues to the forefront, she fosters conversations that are essential for societal change and healing.

The representation of melanated hair in Ehiko’s art is a celebration of Black identity and beauty. Her pieces challenge societal norms and stereotypes, presenting Black hair in its diverse and natural forms. This representation is not only about aesthetics but also about reclaiming cultural identity and pride.

Ehiko’s exhibitions in Lagos and Toronto have garnered significant attention, and her private collection of purchased work is available upon request. Her contributions to the art world extend beyond her creations; she is also an advocate for using art as a tool for social change and empowerment.

In every piece, Ehiko weaves her experiences, heritage, and vision, creating a tapestry that speaks to the heart and mind. Her work is a powerful reminder of the role of art in decolonization and healing, and her journey continues to inspire and influence the global art community.

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Home + Away artwork opens in Vancouver’s Hastings Park

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A new art installation now towers over Vancouver’s Hastings Park fields in celebration of the city’s history of spectators and sports.

Home + Away is a sculpture by Seattle artists Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo of Lead Pencil Studio, which opened Monday in the southeast end of the historic park.

It’s a 17-metre-tall structure that resembles a narrow set of bleachers — similar to the stands of the Empire Stadium, which stood on the site of the park from 1954 to 1993 and hosted The Beatles, among many others. It recalls a covered ski jump that stood there in the 1950s and the nearby wooden rollercoaster at the PNE.

The city says the public is invited to walk the stairs and sit on the benches.

“In addition to being visually striking, this artwork is intended to be ascended, sat on and experienced. It offers exciting experiences of height and views and provides 16 rows of seating for up to 49 people, making for a unique spectator experience when watching events at Empire Fields,” the city said in a release Monday.

The idea for the park to include public art was outlined in the Hastings Park “Master Plan,” first adopted by the city in 2010. The city says Han and Mihalyo first presented their design in 2015.

“It’s wonderful to see this piece realized within the context of such a well-used public space,” said Han.

Home + Away was inspired directly by the site history of spectatorship, and we hope it will connect Hastings Park users to that history and the majestic views of the environment for many decades to come,” added Mihalyo.

The artwork features a large light-up sign, in the style of a sports scoreboard, that reads “HOME” and “AWAY.”

 

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