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Web 3.0 To Change The Landscape Of Social Media And Online Content – Forbes

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Social media has become a genuine staple of our society this century. From the induction of MySpace to the advent of Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, and then later on lifestyle-focused Instagram. All part of the surge that Web 2.0 brought. The introduction of these platforms also highlighted a bevvy of issues that Web 3.0 could be well placed to fix.

Web 2.0’s social media model is strongly predicated on the accumulation of mass amounts of data from its users. This data is then utilized and exploited for advertising revenue, with only a handful of companies (Meta, Alphabet, and Twitter) controlling the market.

The users themselves on these platforms however have not profited from the value of the data derived from their usage. Decentralized networks will have the potential to shift that power balance.

Instead of being owned by centralized institutions, the community will own the network. This means the governance, rule sets, and general operation of the platform will move back to the users, as will the larger share of the potential profits.

This means someone’s value, and ultimately their activity, on a decentralized network can much more heavily dictate their identity, and the value they generate from the platform.

Blockchain is imperative to this, working as a digital ledger. Users will have their profile on their own Web 3.0 wallet which can be utilized across any decentralized platform. This conglomerate of platforms is known as the Metaverse. Everything a user does or transacts is stored on the blockchain for transparency and safety.

If you remember MySpace, with each profile being heavily customizable through music and branding, this is very much the evolution of that.

A whole host of possibilities from this is evident. Greater control to exploit and generate income from content, cybercrime and fake content being heavily nullified through blockchain, further opportunities to interact for the advertising industry, increased authenticity, and development of digital labor markets across the world.

Real world application

Entrepreneur Max Logan has been using social media to develop his growing watch business. Generating strong profits from sales through his influencer status and use of his social network.

“I started by buying Gshock watches and realizing that there is very little room for profitable trades. I eventually worked my way up to Breitling then Rolex, Patek Phillipe, and Richard Mille.” Logan said.

He added: “I am an influencer and show off the watches I invest in for about a year before listing them for sale. Showcasing the watches helps me gain potential buyers on social media platforms rather than selling to a watch dealer who takes roughly 20% off the market value.”

Logan has accumulated a genuine following of watch enthusiasts, collectors, and buyers across social media. Talking about the advent of Web 3.0, Logan believed it could drastically change consumerism.

“I used social media to grow a community of like-minded people to learn and do business with. The possibilities Web 3.0 brings are legitimately endless for me in not only communicating and growing a community but being able to have a means of large scale economic transactions to grow my business.”

“It’s exciting what’s happening, and I’m planning on being a first-mover to capitalize on the technological growth and help the entire watch market grow.”

“I’ve been buying and selling watches for over 10 years with my best sale generating over $175,000 in profit. For an entrepreneur like me, Web 3.0 is going to be something that moves the needle even further.”

When and how wide-scale adoption will happen is anyone’s guess but the potential for innovation and positive adaptation will be very much possible.

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Sunday Reading: Social-Media Disrupters – The New Yorker

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Sunday Reading: Social-Media Disrupters

Elon Musk Ivanka Trump and others at a black tie event cheersing their drinks.

Photograph by Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg / Getty

This past week, Elon Musk declared that he would allow Donald Trump back on Twitter, then wavered over his planned purchase of the social-media behemoth. As billionaire tech magnates dominate the public square and transform how we consume information, we’re bringing you a selection of pieces about social-media disrupters and their impact.

<a aria-label="More from the Archive” class=”external-link external-link-embed__hed-link button” data-event-click=”"element":"ExternalLink","outgoingURL":"https://www.newyorker.com/newsletter/classics"” href=”https://www.newyorker.com/newsletter/classics” rel=”nofollow noopener” target=”_blank”>More from the Archive

Sign up for Classics, a twice-weekly newsletter featuring notable pieces from the past.

In “Plugged In,” from 2009, Tad Friend profiles an earlier incarnation of Musk, when the Tesla C.E.O. was focussed primarily on pitching his vision for electric cars and colonizing Mars. In “Can Mark Zuckerberg Fix Facebook Before It Breaks Democracy?,” Evan Osnos writes about the social-media platform’s evolution (or devolution) from a networking site to one of the leading disseminators of extremist rhetoric and propaganda. In “Reddit and the Struggle to Detoxify the Internet,” Andrew Marantz examines the destructive impact of rampant online conspiracy theories and hate speech. Finally, in “What Is It About Peter Thiel?,” Anna Wiener considers the influence of the first outside investor in Facebook—who, after serving as one of Trump’s biggest donors in 2016, continues to make forays into Republican politics, recently backing two Trumpian Senate candidates, J. D. Vance, in Ohio, and Blake Masters, in Arizona. For Thiel, Wiener writes, “the processes of liberal democratic life are either an obstacle or a distraction. . . . What’s on offer is a fantasy of a future shaped purely by technology.”

David Remnick


Musk and his children with clay model cars
Can Elon Musk lead the way to an electric-car future?

A GIF shows a stream of data materialize into a portrait of Peter Thiel.
The billionaire venture capitalist has fans and followers. What are they looking for?

Image may contain: Human, Person, Furniture, and Tabletop
How do we fix life online without limiting free speech?

Animated gif of a flashing, pixelated photograph of Mark Zuckerberg
The most famous entrepreneur of his generation is facing a public reckoning with the power of Big Tech.

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Health authority sues Brandon psychiatric nurse over allegedly defamatory social media posts – CBC.ca

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A Brandon, Man., woman who was a psychiatric nurse is being sued by her former employer over posts on TikTok, Facebook and Instagram calling fellow employees “idiots” and accusing the health authority of killing its patients. 

The case comes at a time when legal experts say the number of lawsuits filed over social media posts is growing rapidly.

In its lawsuit filed April 12, the Prairie Mountain Health authority is seeking a court injunction to prohibit the nurse from publishing defamatory statements about her former employer and make her remove existing posts.

Ten employees of the western Manitoba regional health authority are also plaintiffs in the lawsuit. They allege the nurse made false, malicious and defamatory social media posts about them, as well as the employer.

The psychiatric nurse’s Manitoba registration to practise was suspended on Jan. 12. The regulatory college’s website shows she then voluntarily surrendered her registration, effective Jan. 17.

The reason for the suspension is not stated on the Brandon woman’s listing on the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of Manitoba website. The college’s registrar, Laura Panteluk, said she cannot talk about a specific case.

CBC News is not naming the people in the lawsuit due to allegations in it about mental health. The defendant has not filed a statement of defence and the allegations have not been proven in court.

Staff called ‘lazy, incompetent’: lawsuit

The psychiatric nurse worked at the Brandon Regional Health Centre, according to the statement of claim filed in Court of Queen’s Bench at Winnipeg.

The lawsuit refers to the content of four videos the defendant posted on her social media accounts. 

In January, she posted a video on her TikTok, Facebook, and Instagram accounts that refers to some of the plaintiffs as “idiots, horrible nurses” who do not care about patients, the claim says. 

It alleges the nurse used defamatory words to say some of the other employees were “lazy, incompetent, unintelligent, and do not care about the [Brandon Regional Health Centre] patients.”

The claim alleges that in the video, the nurse said she was bullied at work and that a manager — who is one of the plaintiffs — questioned her mental health in a disciplinary meeting, causing her to go on sick leave.

The claim also alleges that in another video the nurse posted, she said Brandon health centre staff “were making fun of homeless people,” and that the health centre “protects abusers” and “kills its patients.”

The court document alleges the nurse said in a video that she intended to determine the identities of staff members working on a particular day, and then publish their names in a video on her TikTok account in an attempt to cause them to lose their jobs.

“As a result of the publication of the defamatory words, the plaintiffs have been subjected to ridicule, alienation, and contempt and have suffered damages to their reputation,” both personally and professionally, the claim alleges.

It says they’ve suffered “embarrassment, humiliation, fear, and anxiety.”

The nurse has refused to remove two of the videos from her social media accounts, the claim says, further aggravating the damage to the plaintiffs. 

Attempts by CBC to contact the defendant were not successful.

Prairie Mountain Health communications co-ordinator Blaine Kraushaar said the health authority has no comment on the case.

Social media suits becoming more common: lawyer

Toronto lawyer Howard Winkler, who specializes in defamation law, says the number of lawsuits about social media posts has grown “exponentially.”

“It’s becoming more and more common as people are becoming more comfortable with their use of social media,” said Winkler, who is not involved with the Manitoba case.

Toronto lawyer Howard Winkler says the number of lawsuits related to social media posts has increased ‘exponentially.’ (Submitted by Howard Winkler)

The unrestrained expressions of opinions and anger found on social media can be very harmful, he said.

But social media users should be aware that ordinary laws of defamation apply to those kinds of posts, said Winkler, meaning they can face financial damages in court.

“So people have to be very careful when they’re posting these kinds of messages.”

A person’s social media footprint can also affect future employment prospects, regardless of whether or not their criticisms were valid.

“If someone’s applying for a job and the employer does a social media search and they see that a person’s had an earlier dispute with an employer, that may be a red flag to an employer that there’s some risk associated with hiring that person,” Winkler said.

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NY governor rips social media sites in wake of Buffalo mass shooting – The Hill

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New York Gov. Kathy Hochul (D) slammed social media platforms on Saturday after a gunman opened fire at a Buffalo, New York supermarket while broadcasting on Twitch, a live streaming service.

During remarks hours after the shooting, which killed 10 people, Hochul said social media outlets must be “more vigilant” in monitoring content.

“These outlets must be more vigilant in monitoring social media content. And certainly the fact that this act of barbarism, this execution of innocent human beings could be live streamed on social media platforms and not taken down within a second, says to me that there is a responsibility out there,” Hochul said.

“And we’re going to continue to work on this and make sure that those who provide these platforms have a moral and ethical, and I hope to have a legal responsibility to ensure that such hate cannot populate these sites, because this is the result,” she added.

The governor also said there is a “feeding frenzy” in social media outlets “that has to stop.”

“Mark my words we’ll be aggressive in our pursuit of anyone who subscribes to the ideals professed by other white supremacists and how there’s a feeding frenzy on social media platforms where hate festers more hate, that has to stop,” she said.

The alleged gunman, identified as 18-year-old Payton Gendron from Conklin, New York, shot 13 people on Saturday at a Tops Friendly Market, killing 10 and injuring three. Eleven of the victims shot were Black.

Authorities are now investigating the incident as a hate crime.

The shooter was wearing military gear during the attack and broadcasted it from a helmet camera

Twitch said the video of the incident was taken down within two minutes of when the shooting started, according to The New York Times. A spokeswoman for the platform said the user has been suspended from the service indefinitely, and noted that the company “has a zero-tolerance policy against violence of any kind and works swiftly to respond to all incidents.”

The shooter also allegedly posted a manifesto on 4chan, an online forum. The statement outlined ideas to assault Black individuals, according to NBC News.

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