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What you need to know about COVID-19 in Ottawa on Sunday, Nov. 15 – Yahoo News Canada

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What you need to know about COVID-19 in Ottawa on Sunday, Nov. 15
<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Recent developments:” data-reactid=”32″>Recent developments:

  • The Maniwaki, Que., area is facing red zone restrictions as COVID-19 cases climb.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="What’s the latest?” data-reactid=”35″>What’s the latest?

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The COVID-19 pandemic is creating boom times for local businesses in picturesque Almonte, Ont., as people decide to travel closer to home — but local health officials would prefer that visitors from higher-risk areas stay away.” data-reactid=”36″>The COVID-19 pandemic is creating boom times for local businesses in picturesque Almonte, Ont., as people decide to travel closer to home — but local health officials would prefer that visitors from higher-risk areas stay away.

Ottawa Public Health (OPH) reported another 62 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday and two more deaths. 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The provincial government, meanwhile, confirmed more than 1,200 cases — numbers that come as Ontario faces&nbsp;the prospect of another&nbsp;lockdown&nbsp;to curb the spread of COVID-19.” data-reactid=”38″>The provincial government, meanwhile, confirmed more than 1,200 cases — numbers that come as Ontario faces the prospect of another lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Across the river in western Quebec, health officials reported 41 new cases on Sunday.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="How many cases are there?” data-reactid=”40″>How many cases are there?

As of Sunday, 7,906 people have tested positive for COVID-19 in Ottawa. There are 525 active cases and 7,023 resolved cases.

The city’s death toll stands at 358.

Public health officials have reported more than 12,500 COVID-19 cases across eastern Ontario and western Quebec, including more than 10,900 resolved cases.

Eighty-eight people with COVID-19 have died elsewhere in eastern Ontario, along with 64 in western Quebec. 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="CBC Ottawa is profiling those who’ve died of COVID-19, starting with one of the city’s youngest victims. If you’d like to share your loved one’s story, please get in touch.” data-reactid=”45″>CBC Ottawa is profiling those who’ve died of COVID-19, starting with one of the city’s youngest victims. If you’d like to share your loved one’s story, please get in touch.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="What can I do?” data-reactid=”46″>What can I do?

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Both Ontario and Quebec are telling people to&nbsp;limit close contact only to those they live with, or one other home if people live alone,&nbsp;to slow the spread of the coronavirus.” data-reactid=”47″>Both Ontario and Quebec are telling people to limit close contact only to those they live with, or one other home if people live alone, to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Ottawa is currently in the orange zone of the provincial pandemic scale, meaning larger organized gatherings are allowed and restaurants, gyms and theatres can reopen.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Ottawa's medical officer of health, Dr. Vera Etches, has said&nbsp;people&nbsp;should focus on managing&nbsp;risks and taking&nbsp;precautions, such as seeing a few friends outside at a distance.” data-reactid=”49″>Ottawa’s medical officer of health, Dr. Vera Etches, has said people should focus on managing risks and taking precautions, such as seeing a few friends outside at a distance.

The Eastern Ontario Health Unit is in yellow, with slightly looser rules around serving hours and restaurant capacities, but they are slated to be moved to orange as of Monday.

The rest of eastern Ontario is green, the lowest level.

The medical officer of health for the Kingston, Ont., area is asking residents to stay within the region to avoid more “spillover” from Toronto and Ottawa.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="WATCH: As the second wave accelerates, Canadians struggle with COVID-19 gudelines” data-reactid=”53″>WATCH: As the second wave accelerates, Canadians struggle with COVID-19 gudelines

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="In Gatineau&nbsp;and the surrounding area,&nbsp;which is one of Quebec’s red zones, health officials say the situation is stable, but now needs to improve. They&nbsp;are still asking residents not to leave home unless it’s essential.” data-reactid=”54″>In Gatineau and the surrounding area, which is one of Quebec’s red zones, health officials say the situation is stable, but now needs to improve. They are still asking residents not to leave home unless it’s essential.

Indoor dining at restaurants remains prohibited, while gyms, cinemas and performing arts venues are all closed.

The rest of western Quebec is orange, which allows private gatherings of up to six people and organized ones up to 25 — with more in seated venues.

Travel from one region to another discouraged throughout the Outaouais. Ontario says people shouldn’t travel to a lower-level region from a higher one.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="What about schools?” data-reactid=”58″>What about schools?

There have been about 200 schools in the wider Ottawa-Gatineau region with a confirmed case of COVID-19:

Few have had outbreaks, which are declared by a health unit in Ontario when there’s a reasonable chance someone who has tested positive caught COVID-19 during a school activity.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="WATCH: Questions left&nbsp;unanswered about extending winter break” data-reactid=”62″>WATCH: Questions left unanswered about extending winter break

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Distancing and isolating” data-reactid=”63″>Distancing and isolating

The novel coronavirus primarily spreads through droplets when an infected person coughs, sneezes, breathes or speaks onto someone or something. These droplets can hang in the air.

People can be contagious without symptoms.

This means people should take precautions such as staying home when sick, keeping hands and frequently touched surfaces clean, socializing outdoors as much as possible and maintaining distance from anyone they don’t live with — even with a mask on.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Ontario has abandoned its concept of social circles.” data-reactid=”67″>Ontario has abandoned its concept of social circles.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Etches&nbsp;says&nbsp;people should be wary of blind spots, like taking a&nbsp;lunch break at work with colleagues&nbsp;or carpooling.” data-reactid=”68″>Etches says people should be wary of blind spots, like taking a lunch break at work with colleagues or carpooling.

Andrew Lee/CBCAndrew Lee/CBC

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Andrew Lee/CBC
<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Masks are&nbsp;mandatory in indoor public settings in Ontario&nbsp;and Quebec and should be worn&nbsp;outdoors when people can’t distance from others. Three-layer non-medical masks with a filter&nbsp;are recommended.” data-reactid=”93″>Masks are mandatory in indoor public settings in Ontario and Quebec and should be worn outdoors when people can’t distance from others. Three-layer non-medical masks with a filter are recommended.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms should self-isolate, as should those who've been&nbsp;ordered to do so by their local public health unit. The duration&nbsp;depends on the circumstances in both Ontario and Quebec.” data-reactid=”94″>Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms should self-isolate, as should those who’ve been ordered to do so by their local public health unit. The duration depends on the circumstances in both Ontario and Quebec.

Health Canada recommends older adults and people with underlying medical conditions and/or weakened immune systems stay home as much as possible. 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Anyone who has travelled recently outside Canada&nbsp;must go straight home and stay there for 14 days.” data-reactid=”96″>Anyone who has travelled recently outside Canada must go straight home and stay there for 14 days.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="What are the symptoms of COVID-19?” data-reactid=”97″>What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="COVID-19&nbsp;can range from a cold-like illness to a severe lung infection, with common symptoms including fever, a cough, vomiting and the loss of taste or smell.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”98″>COVID-19 can range from a cold-like illness to a severe lung infection, with common symptoms including fever, a cough, vomiting and the loss of taste or smell. 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Less common symptoms include chills, headaches and pink eye. Children can develop a rash.” data-reactid=”99″>Less common symptoms include chills, headaches and pink eye. Children can develop a rash.

If you have severe symptoms, call 911.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Mental health can also be affected by the pandemic and resources are available to help.” data-reactid=”101″>Mental health can also be affected by the pandemic and resources are available to help.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Where to get tested” data-reactid=”102″>Where to get tested

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="In eastern Ontario:” data-reactid=”103″>In eastern Ontario:

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Ontario recommends only getting tested if you have symptoms, or if you’ve been told to by your health unit or the province.” data-reactid=”104″>Ontario recommends only getting tested if you have symptoms, or if you’ve been told to by your health unit or the province.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Anyone seeking a test should now book an appointment. Different sites in the area have different ways to book, including over the phone or going in person to get a time slot.” data-reactid=”105″>Anyone seeking a test should now book an appointment. Different sites in the area have different ways to book, including over the phone or going in person to get a time slot.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="People without symptoms, but who are part of the province's targeted testing strategy,&nbsp;can make an appointment at select pharmacies.” data-reactid=”106″>People without symptoms, but who are part of the province’s targeted testing strategy, can make an appointment at select pharmacies.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Ottawa has&nbsp;eight permanent test sites, with additional mobile sites deployed wherever demand is particularly high.” data-reactid=”107″>Ottawa has eight permanent test sites, with additional mobile sites deployed wherever demand is particularly high.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The Eastern Ontario Health Unit has sites in Alexandria, Cornwall, Hawkesbury, Limoges, Rockland and Winchester.” data-reactid=”108″>The Eastern Ontario Health Unit has sites in Alexandria, Cornwall, Hawkesbury, Limoges, Rockland and Winchester.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark health unit has permanent sites in Almonte, Brockville, Kemptville and Smiths Falls.” data-reactid=”109″>The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark health unit has permanent sites in Almonte, Brockville, Kemptville and Smiths Falls.

Natalia Goodwin/CBCNatalia Goodwin/CBC

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Natalia Goodwin/CBC

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Kingston's test site is at the Beechgrove Complex. The area’s other test site is in Napanee.” data-reactid=”130″>Kingston’s test site is at the Beechgrove Complex. The area’s other test site is in Napanee.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="People can&nbsp;arrange a test in Bancroft and Picton by calling the centre or Belleville and Trenton online.” data-reactid=”131″>People can arrange a test in Bancroft and Picton by calling the centre or Belleville and Trenton online.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Renfrew County residents should call their family doctor or 1-844-727-6404 for a test or with questions, COVID-19-related or not. Test clinic locations are posted weekly. There are none on Remembrance Day.” data-reactid=”132″>Renfrew County residents should call their family doctor or 1-844-727-6404 for a test or with questions, COVID-19-related or not. Test clinic locations are posted weekly. There are none on Remembrance Day.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="In western Quebec:” data-reactid=”133″>In western Quebec:

Tests are strongly recommended for people with symptoms or who have been in contact with someone with symptoms.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Outaouais residents can make an appointment in Gatineau seven days a week at 135 blvd. Saint-Raymond or 617 avenue Buckingham.” data-reactid=”135″>Outaouais residents can make an appointment in Gatineau seven days a week at 135 blvd. Saint-Raymond or 617 avenue Buckingham.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="They can now check the approximate wait time for the Saint-Raymond site.” data-reactid=”136″>They can now check the approximate wait time for the Saint-Raymond site.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="There are recurring clinics by appointment in communities such as Gracefield, Val-des-Monts and Fort-Coulonge.” data-reactid=”137″>There are recurring clinics by appointment in communities such as Gracefield, Val-des-Monts and Fort-Coulonge.

Call 1-877-644-4545 with questions, including if walk-in testing is available nearby.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="First Nations, Inuit and Métis:” data-reactid=”139″>First Nations, Inuit and Métis:

Akwesasne now has 30 known active cases of COVID-19, its highest of the pandemic.Ten of them are on the Canadian side of the international border. 

Its council is asking residents to avoid unnecessary travel.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Aswesasne&nbsp;schools are temporarily closed to in-person learning and its Tsi Snaihne Child Care Centre has also closed. It&nbsp;has a COVID-19 test site available by appointment only.” data-reactid=”142″>Aswesasne schools are temporarily closed to in-person learning and its Tsi Snaihne Child Care Centre has also closed. It has a COVID-19 test site available by appointment only.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Anyone returning to the community on the Canadian side of the international border who's been farther than 160 kilometres away — or visited Montreal — for non-essential reasons is asked to self-isolate for 14 days.” data-reactid=”143″>Anyone returning to the community on the Canadian side of the international border who’s been farther than 160 kilometres away — or visited Montreal — for non-essential reasons is asked to self-isolate for 14 days.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte reported its first confirmed case last week.” data-reactid=”145″>The Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte reported its first confirmed case last week.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="People in Pikwakanagan can book a COVID-19 test by calling 613-625-2259.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”146″>People in Pikwakanagan can book a COVID-19 test by calling 613-625-2259. 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Anyone in Tyendinaga who’s interested in a test can call 613-967-3603.” data-reactid=”147″>Anyone in Tyendinaga who’s interested in a test can call 613-967-3603.

Inuit in Ottawa can call the Akausivik Inuit Family Health Team at 613-740-0999 for service, including testing, in Inuktitut or English on weekdays.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="For more information” data-reactid=”149″>For more information

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Ontario logs more than 1700 new cases of COVID-19 as positivity rate inches higher – CTV Toronto

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TORONTO —
Ontario is reporting more than 1,700 new COVID-19 infections Monday morning as the province’s positivity rate inches closer to five per cent.

Health officials added 1,746 cases, which is up slightly from the 1,708 infections added a day earlier.

With 39,406 tests completed in the last 24 hours the province’s COVID-19 positivity rate stands at 4.6 per cent, the highest it’s been since last Wednesday. The number of tests processed is down considerably from the province’s daily testing goal of 50,000 which it exceeded for three straight days prior. 

Monday’s report brings the total number of COVID-19 infections in Ontario to 116,492, including deaths and recoveries.

Eight more deaths were recorded in the previous day pushing the province’s COVID-19 death toll to 3,656.

As well, 1,320 cases are now considered to be resolved by the ministry of health. At least 98,639 people who contracted COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic have since recovered.

Most of the cases added Monday were found in people between the ages of 20 and 39. Those 645 lab-confirmed infections push the case total for that age group to 42,460, the most in the province.

Another 526 cases were reported in people between the ages of 40 and 59 while 234 cases were logged in people 19 years of age and younger.

At least 233 cases were documented in people between the ages of 60 and 79 and 106 cases were found in those 80 years of age and older.  

Toronto reports record number of cases, Windsor-Essex moves to ‘red zone’

A record 622 cases were reported in Toronto , one of two areas currently observing the lockdown measures of the province’s COVID-19 framework.

Peel Region is also under lockdown and reported 390 new cases.

York and Durham regions both reported new case numbers in the triple digits and are currently in the province’s “red zone,” which places a cap on indoor gatherings and non-essential activities.

The City of Hamilton, Halton and Waterloo are also observing the same restrictions and all reported new case numbers in the double digits.

Windsor-Essex reporter 38 new cases and moved into the “red zone” earlier this morning.

There are currently 618 patients in Ontario hospitals with COVID-19. Of those, 168 are being treated in an intensive care unit and 108 are on a ventilator.

Some 39,000 COVID-19 tests remain under investigation.

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Ontario reports 1,746 new COVID-19 cases, 7-day average climbs to new high – CBC.ca

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Premier Doug Ford is scheduled to hold a news conference beginning at 1 p.m. in Vaughan. Ford’s office says he will be joined by the ministers of finance and education.

You can watch it live in this story.


Ontario reported another 1,746 cases of COVID-19 on Monday, as tougher restrictions go into effect in five regions of the province.

The new cases include 622 in Toronto, 390 in Peel Region, 217 in York Region and 108 in Durham Region. They push the seven-day average to a record high of 1,570. 

Other public health units that saw double-digit increases were:

  • Waterloo Region: 74
  • Hamilton: 54
  • Windsor: 38
  • Halton Region: 35
  • Ottawa: 29
  • Simcoe Muskoka: 28
  • Niagara Region: 22
  • Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph: 22
  • Thunder Bay: 21
  • Eastern Ontario: 15
  • Middlesex-London: 14

(Note: All of the figures used in this story are found on the Ontario health ministry’s COVID-19 dashboard or in its daily epidemiologic summary. The number of cases for any region may differ from what is reported by the local public health unit because local units report figures at different times.)

There are 102 school-related cases in today’s update: 86 students, 15 staff and one person who was not identified. Those infections include 19 at an east-end Toronto elementary school that were identified by the targeted testing of asymptomatic students, teachers and other staff. 

There are currently 14,197 confirmed, active cases of COVID-19 provincewide, the most since the first was reported in Ontario on January 25. 

Ontario’s network of labs processed 39,406 test samples of the novel coronavirus, and recorded a test positivity rate of 4.6 per cent.

The number of people in Ontario hospitals with the illness climbed to 618, the most at any point during the second wave, and due to a timing error, data for up to 40 hospitals was not included in that figure. Those being treated in intensive care increased by 12 to 168. Public health officials have said that 150 is the threshold for when facilities must begin postponing or cancelling scheduled procedures to accommodate COVID-19 patients. Further, of the 168 in ICUs, 108 are on ventilators. 

The province also reported eight additional deaths, pushing the official death toll to 3,656.

Meanwhile, the provincial government announced last week it would move Windsor-Essex into the red alert level of its tiered framework, the strictest level short of a lockdown.

In that level, indoor dining at restaurants and bars is capped at 10 customers, while social gatherings must have fewer than five people indoors and 25 outdoors.

Meanwhile, Halidimand-Norfolk is shifting to the orange level, and three other regions — Hastings Prince Edward, Lambton and Northwestern — are going into the yellow level.

The province says the regions will stay in their new categories for at least 28 days, or two COVID-19 incubation periods, before a change is considered.

Officials say they continue to monitor public health data weekly to see if any other regions require additional intervention.

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Army arrive at Bristol stadium for COVID vaccine roll-out 'due to start next week' – Yahoo Canada Sports

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CBC

Vancouver Mayor wants Indigenous leaders to head possible 2030 Olympic bid

It was during one of the early planning sessions for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics that Chief Gibby Jacob heard a provincial government official talking about the Callahan Valley, which would eventually host cross-country skiing and ski jumping during the Games. Jacob, who participated in the bidding process for the Olympics and was a member of the Games organizing committee board, finally put up his hand. “I asked who the hell is this Callahan and how the hell did he get his name on our lands,” the Squamish Nation hereditary chief said with a chuckle. “They all looked at each other. I said find out and let us know.” It turns out the Callahan Valley, located near Whistler, B.C., was named after one of the early surveyors in the region. “That was the start of our big push to get our names back on places,” said Jacob. Indigenous groups had a voice in organizing and hosting the 2010 Games. But Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart has suggested any movement to bring another Games to the city should be headed by Indigenous leaders. In early November, Vancouver city council voted to postpone a decision on whether it wants to explore making a bid. City staff are expected to present a report to council in early 2021. Stewart has said one of his conditions for supporting a bid is that the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh — the three Indigenous First Nations whose traditional territory includes Vancouver — head the Olympic bid committee. “I have talked to the Nations about this and there’s interest there,” the Vancouver Sun reported Stewart saying in a state-of-the-city address to the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade. Emails to Stewart’s office asking to explain the mayor’s proposal were not immediately answered. Khelsilem, a councillor with the Squamish Nation Council, isn’t aware of any formal talks about leading a bid. “We haven’t had any formal discussion about it,” he said. “We haven’t made any formal decision about whether we want or don’t want. And we haven’t had any formal discussions with our neighbouring nations.” Representatives of the Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh did not respond to interview requests. Khelsilem said before any decision is made, the pros and cons of hosting an Olympics must be weighed. “The reality is that something like hosting an Olympics requires a significant amount of investment and support from both the federal and provincial governments,” he said. “While there are a number of reported advantages, there’s also a number of drawbacks. “I think a lot of that workflow needs to be figured out, especially in the context of the challenges that we’re going to face over the next decade and the challenges that we’re facing on a number of fronts.” Furthermore, Jacob said: “there’s a lot to be gained by being involved [in a bid] for our people.” “I don’t think that our nations, given what we have as far as leadership resources and how fast they seem to change, would be able to take things right from scratch to completion,” he said. Creating a common agenda With 15 of the venues used for the 2010 Olympics built on First Nation traditional territories, Indigenous support was crucial for the Games success. The Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, Musqueam and Lil’Wat nations formed The Four Host First Nations, a non-profit organization with the goals of uniting Canada’s Indigenous people and encouraging inclusion across the country. “I think it created a common agenda,” said Jacob. “By doing that and achieving what we set out, it was totally outstanding. “I think it showed leadership that the four separate First nations could work together for a common purpose and get benefits from it.” WATCH | President of 2010 Games says Vancouver should bid for 2030: Involvement in the Games raised awareness of Indigenous issues across Canada, he said. “When we first started out, we were pretty invisible in our own territories,” said Jacob. Indigenous groups did “fairly well in compensation for the use of our lands,” he said. The Olympics also led to traditional Indigenous names being returned to locations and landmarks plus recognition of First Nation arts and culture. John Furlong, who was head of the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC), is part of the group looking at the 2030 Games. He said any bid would be impossible without Indigenous participation. “I see no scenario at all in which First Nations are not involved,” he said. “They were a difference maker in 2010. “First Nations are in multiple new business since 2010. My instincts tell me they will be keenly interested in being involved again.”

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