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Where On Earth Did NASA Plant The Moon Trees From Apollo 14 Mission? – Science Times

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Moon trees are among the most notable space experiments that NASA ever conducted in history. A previous report from Science Times said that about 500 seeds were sent to space aboard the Apollo 14 mission in 1971 to know if these seeds that experienced microgravity will grow differently from those that have not experienced microgravity at all.

Apollo 14 mission circled the moon 34 times before returning to Earth. Upon returning, NASA revealed that they planted these seeds along with seeds that did not experience counterparts. Around 83 of these seeds grew into trees, which are now dubbed as Moon Trees.

Most of them are in the US, while two are located in South America and one in Europe. NASA has recently shared a map showing these locations 50 years after it was sent to space.

The collection of Moon Trees include Douglas firs, loblolly pines, redwoods, and sycamores.

Moon Trees: A Living Testament of Apollo 14

Apollo 14 mission is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. It is the third lunar mission and the first to land in lunar highlands. Along with the astronauts, NASA also sent seeds classified and sorted to see if microgravity has any effect on them. At the same time, they also kept similar types of seeds on Earth as a comparison.

Although there were almost 500 seeds sent to space, MailOnline reported that many became unusable for the experiment because the canister it was put into burst open during the decontamination procedure when the crew returned to Earth.

“The resulting seedlings were planted throughout the United States (often as part of the nation’s bicentennial in 1976) and the world. They stand as a tribute to astronaut Roosa and the Apollo program,” NASA said.

The commander module pilot Stuart Roosa conducted the observations, experiments, and scientific investigations while in lunar orbit on the seeds.

Command Module Pilot Stuart Roosa conducted observations, experiments, and scientific investigations in lunar orbit.

ALSO READ: Top Strange Experiments in Space Made by Humans

Detailed Map of the Location of Moon Trees

Dr. Michele Tobias of the University of California Davis created a detailed map of the Moon Trees locations that NASA planted around the world.

In a 2016 interview, he said that he learned about the Moon Trees when watching an episode of Huell Howser on KBIE Public Television. It showed one of the locations of the Moon Trees on the California State Capitol grounds.

“I later learned from my aunt that my grandfather was a part of the telemetry crew that retrieved the Apollo 14 mission that carried the seeds that would become the Moon Trees, so there’s something of a connection to this idea,” Tobias said.

According to NASA, the then-President Gerald Ford said in a telegram to U.S. Bicentennial Moon Tree planting ceremonies that Moon Trees were carried by the crew of the Apollo 14 mission, which is a symbolize the spectacular human and scientific achievements, a fitting tribute to NASA that brought the best out of American patriotism and determination to succeed.

Today, experiments in space continue, and various space agencies worldwide are planning to explore further the Moon, Mars, and the cosmos beyond the Solar System.

RELATED TOPIC: NASA Found Missing Golf Ball 50 Years Since Apollo 14 Crew Played on the Moon

Check out more news and information on Moon Mission on Science Times.

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Perseverance saw its own descent stage crash – EarthSky

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The Mars rover Perseverance captured a photo on February 18, 2021, of its own descent stage crashing onto Mars’ surface and triggering a plume of smoke. Image via NASA.

One of the coolest shots we’ve seen from Perseverance on Mars so far came from the day of its successful landing, February 18, 2021. Minutes after landing, Perseverance managed to look off into the distance and capture an image of its own descent stage crash landing on Mars’ surface.

What’s the descent stage? Its role in Perseverance’s landing was brief, but vital. The descent stage is the rocket-powered section that deployed after the parachute. It was needed in part because Mars’ atmosphere is so thin that parachutes alone can’t guarantee a soft-enough landing. The descent stage kept the rover steady just above Mars’ surface, as the rover was deployed to Mars’ surface via cables. The descent stage wasn’t designed to land safely. After deploying the rover, it flew some distance off and crashed itself. That’s what Perseverance captured in this image.

Perseverance is busy on Mars examining its environs and recording all that it sees. It reports its findings with an anthropomorphized – and adorable – Twitter account @NASAPersevere. Its tweet about the descent stage crash landing was one of its first.

Diagram of stages of rover's descent through Mars' atmosphere to the surface.

Artist’s concept illustrating Perseverance’s landing on Mars, via NASA.

As you may have heard by now – or realized yourself – Mars is the only planet we know that’s populated by robots! A total of 18 spacecraft have been put in orbit around Mars, eight of which are still operating. Of the Mars’ rovers sent to Mars’s surface, five are still operational: Sojourner, Spirit and Opportunity, Curiosity, and Perseverance.

One Mars orbiter, the European Space Agency’s ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, also captured Perseverance on Mars’ surface, at its landing spot. It managed to find the rover and the pieces shed on descent, then tweeted an image:

The rover is near the bottom center of the image, with the heat shield a dark circular spot in the upper right, the descent stage to the left (and in the plume photo above), and the white parachute and back shell bright on the surface at far left. You can see from the overhead view the large ridge between the rover and the descent stage that the rover is looking toward in the top image.

Since 1960, nine countries have sent missions either to orbit Mars or attempt to land on its surface, and many of them have crashed and burned, quite literally.

February 2021 saw three missions successfully make it to Mars, both in orbit and on the surface. Perseverance was one. The other two were the UAE’s Hope mission and China’s Tianwen-1.

Graphic showing Mars and over 20 missions with successes and failures.

Many spacecraft have tried to land on Mars but few have succeeded. Image via Al Jazeera.

Bottom line: NASA’s Mars rover Perseverance tweeted a photo of the resulting plume of smoke from the impact of the descent stage.

Kelly Kizer Whitt

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BlackburnNews.com – Fireball flies over Chatham-Kent sky – BlackburnNews.com

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Fireball flies over Chatham-Kent sky

February 26, 2021 fireball (Screen capture via fireballs.ndc.nasa.gov)


If you witnessed a bright light flash across the sky Friday night in Chatham-Kent, you weren’t imagining things.

A fireball passed over the region around 10:07 p.m.

Peter Brown, a Western University professor, meteor scientist and planetary astronomer tweeted a video of the event. Brown described it as being “as bright as [the] full Moon.”

According to the NASA All Sky Fireball Network, observers in Ontario, Michigan, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania reported seeing a bright fireball in the sky on Friday evening. The event was captured by several all-sky meteor cameras belonging to the NASA All Sky Fireball Network and the Southern Ontario Meteor Network operated by Western University.

According to NASA, an initial analysis of the video shows that the meteor appears 90 km above Erieau on the northern shore of Lake Erie. It moved northwest at a speed of 105,800 km per hour as it crossed the Canada-U.S. border before ending 32 km above Fair Haven, MI.

“At its brightest, the fireball rivalled the quarter Moon in intensity,” read a statement on the NASA All Sky Fireball Network. “Combining this with the speed gives the fragment a mass of at least 2 kilograms and a diameter of approximately 12 centimetres.”

It’s believed that the meteor was caused by a fragment of a Jupiter family comet although an asteroidal origin is also possible.

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Fireball flies over Chatham-Kent sky – BlackburnNews.com

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Fireball flies over Chatham-Kent sky

February 26, 2021 fireball (Screen capture via fireballs.ndc.nasa.gov)


If you witnessed a bright light flash across the sky Friday night in Chatham-Kent, you weren’t imagining things.

A fireball passed over the region around 10:07 p.m.

Peter Brown, a Western University professor, meteor scientist and planetary astronomer tweeted a video of the event. Brown described it as being “as bright as [the] full Moon.”

According to the NASA All Sky Fireball Network, observers in Ontario, Michigan, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania reported seeing a bright fireball in the sky on Friday evening. The event was captured by several all-sky meteor cameras belonging to the NASA All Sky Fireball Network and the Southern Ontario Meteor Network operated by Western University.

According to NASA, an initial analysis of the video shows that the meteor appears 90 km above Erieau on the northern shore of Lake Erie. It moved northwest at a speed of 105,800 km per hour as it crossed the Canada-U.S. border before ending 32 km above Fair Haven, MI.

“At its brightest, the fireball rivalled the quarter Moon in intensity,” read a statement on the NASA All Sky Fireball Network. “Combining this with the speed gives the fragment a mass of at least 2 kilograms and a diameter of approximately 12 centimetres.”

It’s believed that the meteor was caused by a fragment of a Jupiter family comet although an asteroidal origin is also possible.

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