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Why coronavirus hoaxes and other lies spread so quickly on social media – Yahoo Canada Finance

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Social media is the most effective tool to disseminate information, and disinformation travels the fastest. Most recently, fake news of the deadly coronavirus has been spreading like wildfire on social media, also stoking racist, anti-Chinese sentiment.” data-reactid=”15″>Social media is the most effective tool to disseminate information, and disinformation travels the fastest. Most recently, fake news of the deadly coronavirus has been spreading like wildfire on social media, also stoking racist, anti-Chinese sentiment.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="How does this happen? Fake news, which tends to be most sensational and headline-grabbing, can create virtual bandwagons with every batch of retweets on Twitter (TWTR).” data-reactid=”16″>How does this happen? Fake news, which tends to be most sensational and headline-grabbing, can create virtual bandwagons with every batch of retweets on Twitter (TWTR).

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="According to a 2018 MIT study, false news is 70% more likely to be retweeted than true stories, which take nearly six times as long to reach 1,500 people as it does for false stories to reach the same number of people.” data-reactid=”17″>According to a 2018 MIT study, false news is 70% more likely to be retweeted than true stories, which take nearly six times as long to reach 1,500 people as it does for false stories to reach the same number of people.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="“Twitter’s ‘cascades,’ or unbroken retweet chains, falsehoods reach a cascade depth of 10 about 20 times faster than facts. And falsehoods are retweeted by unique users more broadly than true statements at every depth of cascade,” according to the report, which a UBS economist cited in a blog post last week.” data-reactid=”18″>“Twitter’s ‘cascades,’ or unbroken retweet chains, falsehoods reach a cascade depth of 10 about 20 times faster than facts. And falsehoods are retweeted by unique users more broadly than true statements at every depth of cascade,” according to the report, which a UBS economist cited in a blog post last week.

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Fake news can ‘change how people vote’

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Since this study came out, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey has said the site will ban all political ads, as part of an effort to stop the spread of falsehoods. Particularly in an election year, social media creates some of the biggest, most unpredictable risks for investors because of the fake information that can proliferate there.” data-reactid=”20″>Since this study came out, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey has said the site will ban all political ads, as part of an effort to stop the spread of falsehoods. Particularly in an election year, social media creates some of the biggest, most unpredictable risks for investors because of the fake information that can proliferate there.

“Fake news about a candidate can change how people vote. Social media makes all forms of protest easier. Companies can be targeted with social media-led boycotts,” UBS Global Wealth Management Chief Economist Paul Donovan wrote last week. “Such protests are not organized. It makes them harder to predict.”

People wearing masks on the street in Hong Kong on January 30, 2020. People queue in line to purchase protective masks outside the store. (Photo by Yat Kai Yeung/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
People wearing masks on the street in Hong Kong on January 30, 2020. People queue in line to purchase protective masks outside the store. (Photo by Yat Kai Yeung/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="President Donald Trump embodies this powerful way to connect with and galvanize his supporters, even if it’s by spreading hyperbolic sentiments and blatant falsehoods.” data-reactid=”33″>President Donald Trump embodies this powerful way to connect with and galvanize his supporters, even if it’s by spreading hyperbolic sentiments and blatant falsehoods.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Facebook, which has a storied history of allowing false information to proliferate across the platform, and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg, have doubled down on the company’s decision to not fact-check political ads despite the decision by Twitter to ban political ads and by Google (GOOG, GOOGL) to restrict political ad targeting.” data-reactid=”34″>Facebook, which has a storied history of allowing false information to proliferate across the platform, and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg, have doubled down on the company’s decision to not fact-check political ads despite the decision by Twitter to ban political ads and by Google (GOOG, GOOGL) to restrict political ad targeting.

<h2 class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="‘More opportunities to spread fear’” data-reactid=”35″>‘More opportunities to spread fear’

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Outside of false information about political candidates, social media is being used to spread fear — and misinformation — about the coronavirus. The outbreak, which originated in the Chinese city of Wuhan, is now considered a public health emergency and has over 8,200 confirmed cases.” data-reactid=”36″>Outside of false information about political candidates, social media is being used to spread fear — and misinformation — about the coronavirus. The outbreak, which originated in the Chinese city of Wuhan, is now considered a public health emergency and has over 8,200 confirmed cases.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="USA Today outlined some of the social media hoaxes that have emerged about the virus, including that FEMA was proposing martial law to rein it in. As Donovan, the UBS chief economist noted, fear about the virus could cost the economy more than the disease itself.” data-reactid=”37″>USA Today outlined some of the social media hoaxes that have emerged about the virus, including that FEMA was proposing martial law to rein it in. As Donovan, the UBS chief economist noted, fear about the virus could cost the economy more than the disease itself.

“The recent pneumonia virus is widely compared to SARS in 2003. The economic cost of a virus is generally from the fear of the disease, not the disease itself. Seventeen years ago social media was essentially non-existent. Social media today gives more opportunities to spread fear. That fear may lead to economic change, which may be costly. The biggest problem is that economists struggle to fight these risks,” Donovan wrote in his blog post.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="In response to misinformation about the coronavirus, Twitter has created a new search prompt to direct users to credible information about it.” data-reactid=”39″>In response to misinformation about the coronavirus, Twitter has created a new search prompt to direct users to credible information about it.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Meanwhile, social video app TikTok has been hosting several videos that spread misinformation and falsehoods about the coronavirus. This comes despite a policy change concerning misinformation that the platform announced earlier this month, according to a new report from Media Matters, a progressive nonprofit media watchdog. Some teens are even falsely claiming that they have the virus in order to gain traction and virality.” data-reactid=”40″>Meanwhile, social video app TikTok has been hosting several videos that spread misinformation and falsehoods about the coronavirus. This comes despite a policy change concerning misinformation that the platform announced earlier this month, according to a new report from Media Matters, a progressive nonprofit media watchdog. Some teens are even falsely claiming that they have the virus in order to gain traction and virality.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="TikTok recently removed one of those videos after The Daily Beast inquired about it.” data-reactid=”41″>TikTok recently removed one of those videos after The Daily Beast inquired about it.

“While we encourage our users to have respectful conversations about the subjects that matter to them, we remove deliberate attempts to deceive the public,” a TikTok spokesperson told The Daily Beast.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Melody Hahm is Yahoo Finance’s west coast correspondent, covering entrepreneurship, technology and culture. Follow her on Twitter&nbsp;@melodyhahm.” data-reactid=”43″>Melody Hahm is Yahoo Finance’s west coast correspondent, covering entrepreneurship, technology and culture. Follow her on Twitter @melodyhahm.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read more:” data-reactid=”44″>Read more:

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The Murdoch media empire is in trouble. Can Rupert Murdoch's heir save it? – WUNC

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91.5 Chapel Hill 88.9 Manteo 90.9 Rocky Mount
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Your Employees Might Be ‘Quiet Quitting’ On Social Media. Here Are The Signs – Forbes

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The word “sentiment” is an important one in technology. It means an interpretation about feelings, attitudes, or the general vibes toward a given situation. For those on social media, sentiment can reveal intentions and future decisions.

As one example among thousands, you can usually pick up the sentiment about a political candidate, product or service, or celebrity on social media. Right now, all eyes are on Elon Musk and what appears to be a very public shift in sentiment toward his ability to lead a company.

Sentiment is all about tone. The words people use in their posts, whether they are critical or positive, and even if they post short comments or elaborate more can reveal a lot. Artificial intelligence does an adequate job of analyzing sentiment but has a long way to go.

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Many leaders struggle with this topic. Sentiment is hard to pin down and quantify, which means it is hard to put on a spreadsheet. Managers in business prefer hard data and facts that can be relayed by email or in a Word document; they are not as focused on the superficial, emotional stuff.

And yet, there’s a lot to learn about employees who post on social media and what they are saying in public spaces like Twitter where it’s easy to follow their posts.

Recently, the concept of “quiet quitting” came into the spotlight, likely because of the pandemic and other factors like the recent economic downturn and inflation.

Your employees might be having a rough period; they might be ready to find greener pastures. People are struggling out there, and when they start thinking about moving on to another role, it’s often hard to predict what they will do.

On social media, it’s perhaps a little easier.

One of the most obvious signs that an employee might be dissatisfied is when the tone of his or her posts turns negative and sour. When an employee suddenly switches from positive messages about the office or their work to a different tone that’s more pessimistic, it might indicate job dissatisfaction.

Here’s one example. Let’s say you normally see posts from an employee about sports or television shows. Maybe you’re used to seeing positive posts about business trends. Then, you start seeing negative posts about inflation, the cost of goods and services, or how salaries are not keeping up with the cost of living. You might want to address the problem, at least by asking how an employee is doing.

Employees tend to share their true feelings on social media, looking for some commiseration. Some even know you might be following their posts, which is why they might be sharing negative thoughts about their job, the office, or their coworkers.

Maybe the employee is trying to get your attention in a subtle way. Usually, it’s the switch in tone and sentiment that’s the dead giveaway.

“Went to the office today and was really bored” might be a post that is meant to air some deeper feelings about the work the employee is doing. Even more direct posts about the management structure, office politics, and products you make are signs the employee might be thinking of quitting at some point, or is already on the hunt.

Have you noticed the sentiment change for someone at your workplace? It might be time to pull up a chair, ask some honest questions, and get to the bottom of the issue.

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16 Largest Media Companies in the World in 2023

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In this article, we will be taking a look at the 16 largest media companies in the world in 2022. To skip our detailed analysis, you can go directly to see the 5 Largest Media Companies in the World in 2023.

The global media industry is worth nearly $2.3 trillion and is among the biggest industries in the world. It is also easily among the most important industries in the world as it plays an integral role in the promotion and dissemination of information. The media industry consists of broadcasting companies which can include the internet, radio, television and print, though the latter is a dying industry with the introduction of technology and cheaper, more efficient methods of distribution.

The outlook of the entertainment and media company is quite positive, with PwC forecasting that the industry will be worth nearly $3 trillion in 2026. In fact, it is expected to grow much faster than the global economy. Just like any other industry, the media segment took a bit hit in 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic but has shown a strong recovery since and is expected to post a CAGR of 4.6%.

One of the changes we’ve seen in the industry which has been accelerated recently by the pandemic is the consumption of media from home via digital channels. Even as the pandemic has started to wane, digital growth is continuing to increase. We’ve already seen a market shift in terms of media consumption with streaming emerging as the area with the highest growth. While Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) can be considered to be the pioneer in this regard, many other companies have realized the potential of engaging in streaming services. The Walt Disney Company (NYSE:DIS) has now emerged as the biggest player in this market after the launch of Disney+, which combined with other streaming services offered by The Walt Disney Company (NYSE:DIS) means that its total number of subscribers in the world have crossed Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX).

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The biggest media companies in the world wield an incredible amount of power and influence. The companies in our list have a combined market cap of over $700 billion. This also raises an interesting question which many are grappling with nowadays: do media companies have too much power? Well, according to a PEW research, 72% of U.S. adults do believe that media companies have too much power as well as influence in politics today.

Photo by Ashley Byrd on Unsplash

Without further ado, let’s take a look at some of these companies, starting with number 16:

16. RTL Group S.A.

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 6,465

Total sales of the company (in millions): 7,845

Total profits of the company (in millions): 1,538

Total assets of the company (in millions): 12,170

The Luxembourg-based media company currently has around 70 television channels as well as 31 radio stations in multiple European countries including Germany and France.

15. The Interpublic Group of Companies, Inc. (NYSE:IPG)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 13,808

Total sales of the company (in millions): 10,241

Total profits of the company (in millions): 953

Total assets of the company (in millions): 19,909

The Interpublic Group of Companies, Inc. (NYSE:IPG) is a leading advertising company in the U.S. The five major brands owned by The Interpublic Group of Companies, Inc. (NYSE:IPG) include IPG Mediabrands, McCann Group Worldwide, FCB and MullenLowe Group. The Interpublic Group of Companies, Inc. (NYSE:IPG) has around 54,000 employees.

14. Formula One Group (NASDAQ:FWONK)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 13,816

Total sales of the company (in millions): 11,400

Total profits of the company (in millions): 398

Total assets of the company (in millions): 44,341

Formula One Group (NASDAQ:FWONK) consists of companies which are responsible for the promotion of FIA Formula One World Championship. Bernie Ecclestone, considered to be one of the main drivers behind the popularity of F1, was the chief executive of Formula One Group (NASDAQ:FWONK) for 40 years. Formula One Group (NASDAQ:FWONK) is headquartered in London.

13. WPP plc (NYSE:WPP)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 11,363

Total sales of the company (in millions): 17,605

Total profits of the company (in millions): 877

Total assets of the company (in millions): 38,052

WPP plc (NYSE:WPP) is one of the biggest media companies in the United Kingdom. WPP plc (NYSE:WPP) is also considered to be the largest advertising company in the world. The major assets owned by WPP plc (NYSE:WPP) include Essence Global, Finsbury, Wavemaker and Mindshare among others.

12. Fox Corporation (NASDAQ:FOX)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 16,539

Total sales of the company (in millions): 13,591

Total profits of the company (in millions): 1,436

Total assets of the company (in millions): 22,878

Fox Corporation (NASDAQ:FOX) is controlled by one of the most famous personalities of our time, Rupert Murdoch. Fox Corporation (NASDAQ:FOX) owns the Fox Broadcasting Company, Fox News, Fox Business and Fox Television Stations. Fox Corporation (NASDAQ:FOX) was only established 3 years ago after 21st Century Fox was acquired by The Walt Disney Company (NYSE:DIS), with unacquired assets being spun-off to Fox Corporation (NASDAQ:FOX).

11. Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE:OMC)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 16,140

Total sales of the company (in millions): 14,273

Total profits of the company (in millions): 1,294

Total assets of the company (in millions): 26,146

Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE:OMC) is a global media and marketing company which is headquartered in New York City. Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE:OMC) is not just one of the biggest media companies in the world, but also one of the biggest advertising companies in the world. Established 36 years ago, Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE:OMC) has operations in over a hundred countries globally.

10. Warner Bros. Discovery, Inc. (NASDAQ:WBD)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 27,854

Total sales of the company (in millions): 12,180

Total profits of the company (in millions): 1,022

Total assets of the company (in millions): 34,427

One of the most influential media companies in the world, Warner Bros. Discovery, Inc. (NASDAQ:WBD) was only established 7 months ago in April 2022 after being spun-off from Warner Media and merging with Discovery. Warner Bros. Discovery, Inc. (NASDAQ:WBD) has several divisions including the Warner Bros film and television studio, among the most famous film studios in the world. Further, Warner Bros. Discovery, Inc. (NASDAQ:WBD) also owns many U.S. networks including Discovery and Scripps, as well as CNN.

9. Liberty Global plc (NASDAQ:LBTYA)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 9,418

Total sales of the company (in millions): 10,543

Total profits of the company (in millions): 13,427

Total assets of the company (in millions): 46,917

A British-Dutch-American multinational, Liberty Global plc (NASDAQ:LBTYA) maintains headquarters in Denver, London and Amsterdam. Liberty Global plc (NASDAQ:LBTYA) currently has operations in around half a dozen countries and more than 21,000 employees. In addition, Liberty Global plc (NASDAQ:LBTYA) has around 10.8 million cable subscribers and a total of 25.3 million revenue generating units.

8. Publicis Groupe SA

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 16,558

Total sales of the company (in millions): 13,874

Total profits of the company (in millions): 1,214

Total assets of the company (in millions): 37,352

Publicis Groupe is a French media company which is counted among the largest media companies in the world. Publicis is majorly engaged in public relations and multinational advertising and is considered one of the Big Four agency companies globally.

7. DISH Network Corporation (NASDAQ:DISH)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 8,491

Total sales of the company (in millions): 17,881

Total profits of the company (in millions): 2,411

Total assets of the company (in millions): 48,465

DISH Network Corporation (NASDAQ:DISH) owns the direct-broadcast satellite provider Dish in addition to the over-the-top IPTV service known as Sling TV. Like many other media companies, DISH Network Corporation (NASDAQ:DISH) has seen its share price nosedive in 2022. Currently, DISH Network Corporation (NASDAQ:DISH) employs over 16,000 people.

6. Naspers Limited

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 30,418

Total sales of the company (in millions): 7,009

Total profits of the company (in millions): 13,966

Total assets of the company (in millions): 70,813

The largest media company in South Africa, Naspers Limited was initially just a printing company, and the biggest such company in South Africa throughout the 20th century and currently owns Media24 and Takealot.com.

5. Paramount Global (NASDAQ:PARA)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 13,039

Total sales of the company (in millions): 28,586

Total profits of the company (in millions): 4,543

Total assets of the company (in millions): 58,620

Paramount Global (NASDAQ:PARA) is easily one of the biggest media companies in the world and owns Paramount Pictures, the CBS Entertainment Group, which includes CBS and the CW television networks, MTV, Nickelodeon, Comedy Central, VH1, BET, Paramount Network and Showtime. Paramount Global (NASDAQ:PARA) has more than 170 networks currently and has more than 700 million subscribers in around 180 countries.

 

4. Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 127,071

Total sales of the company (in millions): 30,402

Total profits of the company (in millions): 5,007

Total assets of the company (in millions): 45,331

Arguably the pioneer of global streaming, Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) has had a torrid year in 2022 after being the top-performing S&P 500 stock in the 2010s.

 

3. Charter Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ:CHTR)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 60,729

Total sales of the company (in millions): 51,682

Total profits of the company (in millions): 4,654

Total assets of the company (in millions): 143,392

Charter Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ:CHTR) is an American mass media company which has more than 32 million customers in around 41 states.

 

2. The Walt Disney Company (NYSE:DIS)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 176,087

Total sales of the company (in millions): 72,982

Total profits of the company (in millions): 3,082

Total assets of the company (in millions): 203,311

The Walt Disney Company (NYSE:DIS) has been in the news recently its ex-CEO Bob Iger made a comeback to help the company turn around.

 

1. Comcast Corporation (NASDAQ:CMCSA)

Total market cap of the company as of 26th November 2022 (in millions): 154,130

Total sales of the company (in millions): 116,385

l profits of the company (in millions): 14,159

Total assets of the company (in millions): 275,905

Topping the list of the 16 largest media companies in the world in 2022 is Comcast Corporation (NASDAQ:CMCSA). Comcast Corporation (NASDAQ:CMCSA) is the second largest cable television and broadcasting company in the U.S. as well as the biggest Internet service provider in the nation.

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