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'Wordle' fan? The National Gallery of Art has launched a copycat. – The Washington Post

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Summer Brennan can recognize a Vincent van Gogh painting by its wispy, vibrant brushstrokes. A series of loopy spirals or spindly legs? That’s probably Louise Bourgeois.

But after a few days of playing “Artle,” Brennan, a writer based in Paris, began to notice some holes in her art knowledge. For 30 years, she has indulged her love of visual arts by visiting galleries, reading books and attending shows. So when she couldn’t identify a piece by French photographer Eugène Atget, it felt like an embarrassing lapse.

“It does give you some self-awareness when you realize that all the artists you know right away are like White 19th-century artists, that maybe it’s time to expand some of your art appreciation,” Brennan said.

One of the latest “Wordle” copycats challenges players not with letters, but with images plucked from the National Gallery of Art. The popular daily word game, which was purchased by the New York Times for seven figures in January, has sparked dozens of spinoffs: “Squabble” (a Wordle battle royal), “Herdle” (for the musically minded), and even “Lewdle” (for profanity experts).

Worldle, Semantle, Heardle and 9 other Wordle alternatives

“Artle” begins by showing players a piece of art — a painting, photograph or sculpture — from the National Gallery of Art’s 150,000-piece collection, including whimsical paintings by Georgia O’Keeffe and somber Roy DeCarava photographs. Players have four chances to guess the artist. Unlike “Wordle,” there are no hints, although the art becomes progressively easier to identify as players strike out. Players can then share their results with friends through text messages or on social media.

Mary Gregory, an art critic based in New York, began playing “Artle” as soon as it launched last monthand it’s now become a ritual. Every day, Gregory and her husband return to the gallery’s “Artle” website to test their art aptitude and extend their untouched winning streak.

“It’s fun. It’s a little challenge. And, you know what? If you get it wrong at the end, they tell you who it was,” she said. “These are in the collection of the National Gallery, and the National Gallery belongs to everybody.”

Steven Garbarino, a product manager at the gallery, began developing the game after noticing that people were searching for “Art Wordle” online but that no such game existed. It was the worst possible time. In late March, the museum’s staff was busy with “Afro-Atlantic Histories,” the gallery’s largest exhibition since the start of the pandemic. Garbarino worried that launching a gaming app would be seen as a distraction.

To his surprise, National Gallery of Art Director Kaywin Feldman quickly jumped on board. It took little more than a month to build the game, and it quickly began attracting an audience, with players in nearly every country. It has been played more than 1 million times and has 30,000 daily players. The game has increased traffic to the museum’s website by 125 percent.

Kaywin Feldman wants the National Gallery to be relevant to everyone. But first they have to come back.

“You can catch a little bit of lightning in a bottle and see cascading results,” Garbarino said. “We don’t have to spend 12 months developing a huge strategy and positioning plan. We can build something small [like ‘Artle’] that engages the audience.”

Projects such as “Artle” reflect a new vision for the National Gallery of Art: a desire to quickly reach new, more diverse audiences. Since being named director in 2019, Feldman has updated the museum’s mission statement and priorities. The product management team, which developed the game, has doubled in size, including adding more software engineers and digital consultants under Feldman’s leadership. “The bulk of our funding comes from the American taxpayers, so we owe it to them to give them the greatest art experience they can have. And the nation is a very diverse place. We want to focus on the great richness of the diversity of the American people and better reflect the nation,” Feldman said in an interview with Washingtonian last year.

The team worked closely with the gallery’s education department to choose a mix of famous, easily identifiable art and more obscure pieces. Within the game, for example, Georgia O’Keeffe paintings are considered easy to identify, while those by James McNeill Whistler are a little more difficult. Meanwhile, a piece by Elizabeth Catlett, a Black sculptor and graphic artist, is considered difficult to pick out.

The gallery wants the artists displayed in the game to reflect a diversity of races and gender, Garbarino said. “Often some of the lowest success rates are on artists of diverse backgrounds, artists of color or women artists,” he said.

It’s a challenge. Of the 157,553 objects in the gallery’s collection, only 2.3 percent are by non-White artists, and 8.1 percent are by female artists. In the first 45 days of “Artle,” 17.8 percent of the objects used in the game were by non-White artists and 22.2 percent were by female artists.

National Gallery enters new, overdue era with African diaspora show

“It’s a fine balance between bringing up artists that we think should be having a higher priority among the public while maintaining that ease of introduction to the game,” Garbarino said. “If it happens to be two days in a row where it’s a dead White man and someone is like, ‘Hey, every time I come here, it’s only a dead White man.’ It’s like, no, if you look at the broad spectrum of all the artists, it’s much more diverse. But it’s difficult to communicate that in one day.”

The well of famous artists will soon run dry, Garbarino said, and “Artle” will have to begin repeating artists or introducing its players to more unfamiliar names.

That could drive away players like Brennan’s husband who, she said, calls “Artle” “torture” and often simply offers Picasso as the answer to every image to end the game quickly.

It turns out, “Artle” may not be for everyone.

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Colborne art gallery celebrates 25 years of creativity success in the Northumberland community – Northumberland News

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Colborne art gallery celebrates 25 years of creativity success in the Northumberland community  Northumberland News



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University of Exeter at heart of rock art discoveries – BBC

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Amazon rock artExeter University

Archaeologists at the University of Exeter are at the heart of a global event to showcase ancient rock art.

The Painted Forest event in Colombia will show works thought to be from the first humans to enter the Amazon.

The discoveries have been unearthed by Lastjourney, a Colombian-English research collaboration, in which the university has taken a central role.

The symposium will bring international experts together with representatives of indigenous peoples and artists.

Prof José Iriarte from the University of Exeter said: “What we have discovered here in Colombia is an incredible insight into one of the most momentous demographic dispersals of our species into the diverse environments of north west South America.”

Prof Iriarte said the rock art showed “a fascinating glimpse into the earliest artistic expressions of humans around the world”.

Amazon rock art

Exeter University

The artwork documents the arrival of the first humans in the north-western Amazon area almost 13,000 years ago, and the impact they had upon the landscape.

It will be on display in the Colombian city of San Jose de Guaviare, where delegates at the five-day symposium from 29 August to 2 September will sample rock painting and indigenous cooking and visit famous rock art sites of Cerro Azul, Raudal and Nuevo Tolima.

Project leaders from Lastjourney – which include the National University of Colombia, the University of Antioquia and the University of Exeter – will present a new bilingual (English/Spanish) guidebook for a layman’s audience, also titled The Painted Forest.

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Remembering Dori Klaaren and her art – Niagara Frontier Publications

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Sat, Aug 13th 2022 07:00 am

Story and photos by Alice Gerard

Terry and Dori Klaaren were exploring Morocco after having traveled through Europe for approximately eight months. They were a young couple in the early 1970s, and Dori had suggested the trip, explaining that it would be a good time to do it “ ‘Because we’re free; because we’ve got no careers. We have no kids, no debts. We will never be this free again for the rest of our lives. We need to travel,’ ” Terry said to a group at the Grand Island Memorial Library, where he spoke about Dori’s artwork on Aug. 1.

The couple met in Grand Island High School in 1969, where they both took art classes and belonged to the art club. Dori had grown up on Grand Island, and Terry moved there as a high school student.

“I landed on Grand Island. Everyone was happy. I felt at home, and I started dating. I had three girlfriends before I met Dori, and that was the end of my dating career,” Terry recalled.

Morocco was a different world altogether for the couple who had married in 1973.

“It was a cultural jump to go to Europe in the first place,” Terry said. “We took six to eight months doing it. Our last stop was Morocco. We wanted to jump down and go to Africa. We were told not to stay in Tangier, but to go to the interior and see the real Morocco. We hitched a ride with a man from Australia, who just wanted to drive around.

“We went into a place one day in the Atlas Mountains. We’re in a big field surrounded by these tents and there’s all these kinds of horses. They have muskets. They charge down the field and shoot off their guns. It’s this celebration. We’re walking around, the three of us. We get to this big tent full of pillows and these guys invite us in. We’re just kind of gesturing. We had the tea, and we were going to say thank you, so we said that. We were about to leave, and he poses for a picture and says something, and the other man says, ‘He wants to buy your wife.’ He offered camels for her. I don’t think so. It really happened.”

Terry described the entire European adventure as being life-changing for both Dori and him.

“We were there for a year,” he said. “We rode on bicycles. We hitchhiked. We took a couple of trains that we couldn’t afford, but we were there for the better part of the year, from Norway to Morocco. We camped in people’s yards. We camped everywhere, stayed in the occasional hotel. We went to Stonehenge on the Solstice. She planned all this, so it happened. We came back from Europe alive and happy. Dori carried a 45-pound backpack, bicycled every mile.

“We came back young, strong and confident. So, we went back to Grand Island and lived with her folks for about a year. I worked downtown at LL Berger as a window dresser. She worked for the PennySaver, right here, for Skip Mazenauer. With our new nest egg, we went back to Florida and created a child. He is 42 years old now. He is Jason, and he’s great.”

Terry and Dori Klaaren both painted a lighthouse in their own styles.

••••••••

Back in Florida, Terry and Dori found a new way to create art.

“We get into carrousel horse painting,” he said. We had friends who bought full carrousels, restored them, and put them into malls. They hired us to paint the horses. After a while, we got good at it. I was a wood carver, so we went on our own. We went to auctions, and we’d get commissions from people. We’d fix up the horses. We did that for some years. We weren’t making much money, but we loved the work.

“This job got me the opportunity to work in Orlando for a prop shop to paint a big, fake carrousel horse. I see that they’re working on Disney projects. There’s a paint shop. So, I got a job there. Very interesting work. I learned my chops. I learned how to paint big.”

At the same time, however, Dori lost her work opportunities. Terry explained, “She was a calligrapher and a sign painter and a graphic artist and a freelancer for ad agencies. It all went to computers. She said, ‘I’m dead in the water. I have no work.’

“I was in Orlando, with Disney in my portfolio. I want to paint murals. So, she became my agent. Within a year, we tripled our income. Suddenly, I was in hot demand. We got into our business, and we started doing murals and paintings, and she was my manager, the quartermaster, the brains behind the artist. At this point, her art disappeared from the picture. We were being very successful in the mural business. I made a lot of money, but didn’t spend much.

“We were told that we had to spend a lot of money on our business or we’d have to return it in the form of taxes. So, she developed ‘have brush, must travel.’ She planned a trip that would last six to eight weeks, either in Europe or out west in national parks, and then she’d tell my clients, ‘If you’d like a painting done on site anywhere you want, the commission is $200, and he’ll make this painting for you.’ We got a dozen or so commissions, and we went out and did the trip. This is what we spent 20 years doing. It was fun. I’d paint the painting that was commissioned.’

“My painting started to change. Essentially, I was doing acrylics. Dori started off not knowing what to do. She wasn’t a painter. She was a textile person. I suggested that she paint like doing embroidery by doing dots. She was trying to figure out her style. You’ll notice that it changed and got better and better until she made magnificent pieces with nothing but beautiful dots. Then she developed an essential tremor, and she could no longer control her dots. It took her way too long to finish her paintings. There are unfinished paintings, where she just ran out of steam. I suggested that she change her format and just do black and white. This is a woman who was working with a tremor. She could barely write her name, but she could produce artwork. I am here to show you all the things that Dori never got to be known for.”

During the presentation, Terry acknowledged three teachers, who were influences on both Dori and him. They were Lyn Laman, who died May 31, 2019 (three months after Dori); Neil Hoffman, who now lives and works out west; and Lenore Tetkowski, who was in the audience.

“Nothing here is for sale. However, these are reproductions of her work, and they are up for donations. I am going to garner anything that I make from her work and use it for an art incentive award for the high school. No prices. Just donations,” Terry said.

“I ended up by having a beautiful life, doing exactly what I wanted to do,” he added. “I’d never dreamed of being an artist for a living. It never occurred to me. It was always fun. Work was supposed to be not fun. So, the fact that this all happened, and I’m looking back on it now, is a miracle to me. The downside is that I lost her too soon. But we had almost to the day 50 years together.

“We went to see Mount Saint Helens 30 years after the fact, and we hiked for 15 miles into that barren place with nothing but dead trees. We hiked up to the top of that ridge and got the shot of the mountain, the volcano.

“We had 50 of the best years. I lost her too soon, but we had a concentrated 50 years.”

Terry Klaaren, with a painting of his late wife, Dori, who died in 2019.

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