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You can unlock this secret Isu weapon in Assassin’s Creed Valhalla just by whacking a pile of rocks

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A canny Assassin’s Creed Valhalla player has discovered you can unlock a powerful Isu bow just by whacking a pile of rocks.

As demonstrated in this video by JorRaptor, players should head up to Northumbria and visit Brunson Turret. In the nearby lake, you’ll find a small island – and here’s when the magic happens.

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I can’t even begin to understand how someone might have accidentally stumbled upon this, but if you whack the rock a few times – noting that, unlike other piles of ore, it doesn’t break up – quick save, and log out, eventually you’ll respawn in front of a broken pile of rocks and then see the secret Nodens’ Arc bow unlock, popping up as a newly acquired item on your screen (thanks, Kotaku).

Right now it’s presumed this is either a bug or, in the very least, a cheese, so it’s possible Ubisoft might move quickly to prevent more players gaining the powerful weapon so easily, so head up to Northumbria sooner rather than later if you fancy grabbing the bow yourself.

ICYMI, Assassin’s Creed fans have finally translated the secret Isu language. Used by the first civilisation in the Assassin’s Creed series, clever fans have now deciphered what the god-like figures known as the Ancient Ones throughout the Assassin’s Creed series are saying.

From verbs to adjectives and numbers, Access the Animus comprehensively explains how to translate the Isu language, which has its own “complex grammar, alphabet, and a set of rules of its own”. They were even able to work out verb tenses, conjugated words, grammar cases, and sentence structures.

If you want a refresher on the history of Assassin’s Creed, be sure to check out our Assassin’s Creed timeline.

Source: – Gamesradar

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Microsoft .NET Conf: Focus on Windows – InfoQ.com

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Earlier this week, the first edition of the .NET Conf: Focus series for 2021 took place, featuring Windows desktop development topics. The event targeted developers of all stripes, covering both existing functionalities on .NET 5 and upcoming projects such as .NET MAUI and Project Reunion. The focus conferences are free, one-day live-streamed events featuring speakers from the community and .NET product teams.

The focus series is a branch of the original .NET Conf, an annual event organized by the .NET community and Microsoft that showcases the latest developments for the .NET platform. Each focus event targets a specific .NET-related technology, providing a series of in-depth, hands-on sessions aimed at .NET developers.

.NET Conf: Windows was different from the other past events in the series because it was focused on a single operating system (OS) – which may seem strange considering the ongoing unification plan towards a cross-platform, multi-OS .NET framework. However, the focus was justified, considering the importance of upcoming projects such as .NET MAUI and the ongoing efforts related to ARM64 development.

The conference started with an overview of the latest developments related to .NET and desktop development. In this context, Scott Hunter, director of program management at Microsoft, talked about existing .NET 5 features related to desktop app development, such as self-contained single executable files and ClickOnce deployment. He also talked about the latest performance improvements and features in Windows Forms and WPF, assisted with live demonstrations by Olia Gavrysh and Dmitry Lyalin, both at Microsoft.

The following session, presented by Cathy Sullivan (program manager at Microsoft), featured the preview release of the .NET Upgrade Assistant, an automated tool to assist developers in upgrading existing .NET applications to .NET 5. While not being a complete upgrade tool (developers will still have to complete the upgrade manually), its GitHub repository includes a link to a free e-book on porting ASP.NET apps to .NET Core that covers multiple migration scenarios.

The remainder of the sessions were short (approx. 30 minutes), covering topics mentioned in the keynote (such as WPF and Windows forms – including the recent support for ARM64 released with .NET 6 Preview 1), app deployment with ClickOnce, and specific coverage of WebView2, Microsoft’s new embedded web browser control used by Windows Forms. Other interesting sessions included demonstrations on building real-time desktop apps with Azure SignalR services (presented by Sam Basu) and accessing WinRT and Win32 APIs with .NET 5 (presented by Mike Battista and Angela Zhang, both at Microsoft).

The last three sessions focused on features and projects expected to ship with .NET 6 later this year. Daniel Roth, program manager at Microsoft, talked about building hybrid applications with Blazor. Hybrid applications are native apps that use web technologies for the UI, and support for cross-platform hybrid apps is an important feature of both .NET 6 and .NET MAUI.

Zarya Faraj and Miguel Ramos explained the concepts behind Project Reunion, which provides a unified development platform that can be used for all apps (Win32, Packaged, and UWP) targeting all the Windows 10 versions. The event was closed with a presentation by Maddy Leger and David Ortinau (both at Microsoft) on the future of native applications development in .NET 6 – which focused on .NET MAUI.

A relevant takeaway from the conference is how the recent efforts on developing native device applications targeting multiple platforms are revolving around .NET MAUI. However, it is important to notice that .NET MAUI does not represent a universal .NET client application development model, merging both native and web applications. This is an important distinction, especially in light of the many cross-references and mentions of Blazor Desktop, another highly anticipated feature in .NET 6. Richard Lander, program manager for the .NET team at Microsoft, recently approached this topic in multiple comments and posts:

I think folks may be missing the narrative on Blazor desktop. It is intended as a compelling choice for cross-platform client apps that enable using web assets. […] Blazor Desktop and MAUI are intended to be separate. Blazor Desktop will be hosted via a MAUI webview. MAUI will provide the desktop or mobile application container. MAUI will enable using native controls if that is needed/desired.

The next focus events are still undefined. The complete recording of this event is already available on YouTube. Recordings of all .NET Conf and .NET Conf: Focus events are available in curated playlists on MSDN Channel 9.

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Pokémon turns 25 – Eurogamer.net

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I choose you!

Pokémon is 25 years old today, 27th February 2021.

27th February 1996 saw the release of Pocket Monsters Red and Green in Japan for the Game Boy.

25 years later, Pokémon is one of the biggest entertainment brands in the world, and one of the most successful video game franchises.

Designer Satoshi Tajiri has said he was inspired to create the Pokémon saga after collecting insects as a boy.

Pocket Monsters Red and Green was a huge hit in Japan. Pokémon Red and Blue, as it was known on these shores, wouldn’t launch in Europe until 5th October 1999.

Since then, Pokémon has established an empire, with scores of video games, TV shows and films. Pokémon’s link to Nintendo has endured, with the core series of games all launching on the company’s platforms.

And Pokémon shows no sign of slowing down. Amid the enduring popularity of mobile hit Pokémon Go, a flood of new games are coming soon.

New Pokémon Snap is due out on Nintendo Switch in April 2021.

Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Pokémon Shining Pearl launch in late 2021, and see a retro-styled return to Sinnoh.

And an open-world Sinnoh game called Pokémon Legends Arceus and set in a feudal version of the region then follows in early 2022.

Shorter term, tomorrow, 28th February, a live Pokémon concert starring Post Malone will also take place.

So, here’s to you, Pokémon! I choose you!

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The latest 'Valorant' agent controls space and time – Yahoo Canada Shine On

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Eat This, Not That!

Dr. Fauci Warns of This “Very Disturbing” COVID Symptom

Fever, shortness of breath, loss of sense of smell and taste, dry cough, fatigue. Those are just a few of the COVID-19 symptoms listed by the Centers for Disease Control. However, there are several others that have been identified by those infected with the virus. And, according to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the chief medical advisor to the President and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, there is one in particular that he finds “disturbing.” “Many of you are now aware of what had long been called ‘long COVID,'” said Fauci during this week’s White House COVID-19 Response Team briefing. “But actually, what that really is is post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection, which we’re now referring to as ‘PASC,’ or P-A-S-C.” Read on to find out what it is—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus. 1 Dr. Fauci Calls PASC “Disturbing” “We’re starting to see more and more people who apparently recover from the actual viral part of it, and then weeks later, they feel weak, they feel tired, they feel sluggish, they feel short of breath,” Fauci, the President’s Chief Medical Advisor, explained last year. “It’s a chronic projection forward of symptoms, even though the virus is gone, and we think that’s probably an immunological effect,” he continued. “It’s very disturbing, because if this is true for a lot of people, then just recovering from this may not be OK.” Keep reading to see if you have the symptoms. 2 Nearly 30% of COVID Patients Had PASC, in One Recent Study He has continued to discuss the condition, which he now refers to as PASC, or Post-Acute Sequelae of Covid-19. This week he pointed to a new University of Washington study, finding that 30% of patients reported symptoms for as long as nine months. 3 These are the PASC Symptoms The symptoms? While there are over 100 according to surveys of those who suffer from the condition, they include fatigue, gastrointestinal issues, “brain fog,” depression, anxiety, sleep disorders. “New symptoms sometimes arise well after the time of infection, or they evolve over time and persist for months,” Fauci explained. “They can range from mild or annoying to actually quite incapacitating.” (For a list of all 98 Symptoms, see here.) 4 There is No Cure for PASC—and Treatment is Limited “It’s very difficult to treat something when you don’t know what the target of that treatment is,” Fauci said. “There are a lot of important questions with this series of initiatives that we will ultimately answer.” The other big issue for those who suffer from PASC? “The magnitude of the problem is not fully known,” he said. In other words, it isn’t clear if some people will ever recover from the condition. A healthy diet and immune-boosting supplements are recommended by many experts, as is seeing specialists for each symptom.RELATED: Dr. Fauci Just Said When We’d Get Back to Normal 5 What to Do If You Feel You Have PASC If you believe you might suffer from PASC contact your primary care physician. If they can’t help, you can try reaching out to a speciality clinic or join one of the online support groups, including Survivor Corps, where you will find a plethora of resources. Also, follow Fauci’s fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—wear a face mask that fits snugly and is double layered, don’t travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, don’t go indoors with people you’re not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, get vaccinated when it becomes available to you, and to protect your life and the lives of others, don’t visit any of these 35 Places You’re Most Likely to Catch COVID.

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