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A police chief resigns over an anonymous social media account. His replacement is replaced for the same reason – CNN

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On Sunday, Police Chief Brandon del Pozo resigned after a scandal involving his use of an anonymous Twitter account.
Less than 12 hours later, his acting replacement, Deputy Chief Jan Wright, was removed from her role for the use of a Facebook account under a fake name.
By Monday night, Deputy Chief Jon Murad was acting chief, assuring city officials that he “has never engaged in anonymous social media posting.”

What happened last July

The controversy has roots dating back to last July, as Mayor Miro Weinberger outlined in a statement last Friday.
That month, del Pozo told the mayor that he’d been running a Twitter account anonymously under the handle @WinkleWatchers.
Through the account, del Pozo targeted a local man who had been critical of the police department.
Tweeting from the anonymous account, del Pozo called local community organizer Charles Winkleman a “cowardly creature hiding behind an electron curtain,” according to screen shots confirmed by Burlington city officials. The account has since been deleted.
The mayor said he put del Pozo on administrative leave but later reinstated him.
“When dealing with personnel issues as mayor, I generally believe that people deserve second chances if possible, particularly when they have come forward to admit error,” he said in the statement.

What happened next

Cut to last week.
Seven Days, an alternative weekly, asked the mayor about the Chief’s anonymous account.
The mayor publicly accepted del Pozo’s resignation Monday. Del Pozo could not be reached for comment.
At a news conference that day, the mayor announced that Wright would be acting chief.
However, that announcement quickly unraveled.
Soon after the news press conference, Wright told the mayor she had “occasionally operated a Facebook account under the name ‘Lori Spicer’ through which she made comments about and engaged citizens in discussion of Police Department policy and practice.”
As a result, she was replaced as acting chief.
“While Deputy Chief Wright’s situation may be very different than Chief del Pozo’s, given the circumstances the department is facing, I found the failure to raise this issue with me in the lead-up to today to constitute a lapse in judgement,” the mayor said.

What’s next

Now Burlington, Vermont, has a new acting police chief — Jon Murad.
But the two personnel changes raise “the possibility that problematic social media use is far more widespread within the department than previously understood,” the mayor said.
Wright remains a deputy chief on full duty, the city told CNN Tuesday.
But the target of del Pozo’s ire said he didn’t think that was enough.
“The entire scandal and coverup is petty, shameful, and a deeply disturbing display of no accountability or oversight in this city,” Winkleman, the target of del Pozo’s anonymous account, told CNN in an email.
The city said it will be seeking an independent investigation to review the police department’s social media use and policies.

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3 Ways To Clean Up Your Social Media Before A Job Search – Forbes

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Your resume and cover letter will get you in the door for an interview, but your social media can either seal the deal or break it. Here are three ways to clean up your online presence for a job search.

Go back in time.

Your social media will be looked over at some point in the interview process, so you want to be sure that there’s isn’t anything on there that could be considered offensive or paint you in a negative light. To make sure that there’s nothing on your accounts that could harm your chances of getting a job, you need to go back through all of your posts. You want your social media to showcase you are now, not who you used to be.

While a hiring manager shouldn’t take into account what you do in your free time, they most likely will. Photos from parties are fun, but make sure they don’t depict anything wild or out of control. Be sure that everything you post is suitable for work. When in doubt, delete the picture or the tweet. When it comes to Twitter, remember that everything you like and share is public too. Set your accounts to private if you really don’t want to take any pictures down, but be aware that if all of your social accounts are private, this could be a red flag to the hiring manager.

Don’t forget the comments.

It’s not just your old posts that need to be gone through – it’s the comments too. Delete anything not suitable for work or even borderline offensive. To ensure all future comments are work-safe, let your friends know you’re in the process of job searching and that they can text you their comments instead.

Google yourself.

Googling yourself is a great way to catch things that you might have forgotten about or not even realized were out there. You never know what a Google search might turn up, like your middle school YouTube account or an old WordPress blog. It’s also a fascinating way to see how you show up online.

Make sure your LinkedIn is updated.

Make sure that your LinkedIn profile is up to date, including a recent professional photo and current job information. Treat your profile as if it’s an expanded version of your resume. Make use of all of the profile sections such as skills and endorsements, the about section, and accomplishments.

You should also be actively using LinkedIn to share content, comment on posts, and write your own articles. All of these things will look good to recruiters and hiring managers, as it shows you’re engaged in learning and you’re staying on top of current trends and news in your industry.

Remember, your social media presence has the possibility to help or hinder your chances of getting a job. By taking the time to go through your accounts and clean things up, you’re ensuring that it will help.

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Foreign journalists in China see 'rapid decline in media freedom'- survey – Financial Post

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BEIJING — China used coronavirus prevention measures, intimidation and visa curbs to limit foreign reporting in 2020, ushering in a “rapid decline in media freedom,” the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of China (FCCC) said on Monday.

For the third year in a row, no journalists told the group that working conditions had improved, the FCCC said in an annual report based on 150 responses to a survey of correspondents and interviews with bureau chiefs.

“All arms of state power – including surveillance systems introduced to curb coronavirus – were used to harass and intimidate journalists, their Chinese colleagues, and those whom the foreign press sought to interview,” it said.

Authorities cited public health concerns to deny reporters access to sensitive areas and threatened them with enforced quarantine, it added. Visa restrictions were also used to put pressure on reporting.

At least 13 correspondents were given press credentials valid for 6 months or less, the FCCC said. Foreign reporters based in China typically receive one-year visas and must renew them annually.

Journalists were also used as “pawns” in China’s diplomatic disputes, it added.

China expelled more than a dozen foreign journalists at U.S. media organizations in 2020, amid a series of tit-for-tat actions between the countries. Washington also slashed the number of journalists permitted to work in the United States at four major Chinese state-owned media outlets.

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In September, Australia helped two of its foreign correspondents leave China after they were questioned by the country’s state security ministry.

Journalists reporting from far western Xinjiang, where China has been accused of large-scale human rights abuses, encountered especially intense harassment, the report said.

Last year Chinese authorities detained Cheng Lei, an Australian citizen working for Chinese state media, and later Haze Fan, a Chinese national working for Bloomberg News, both on suspicion of endangering national security.

Both remain in detention.

Some Reuters journalists are members of the FCCC. (Reporting by Gabriel Crossley; Editing by Clarence Fernandez and William Mallard)

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Central Okanagan media companies launch Local Advertising Initiative – Kelowna News – Castanet.net

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With many businesses struggling through the pandemic, “support local” is a phrase heard more often than ever recently.

But you often see those businesses, big and small, buying advertising directly from Facebook and Google. It’s important to be mindful of where businesses are investing and how those decisions impact our local economy.

Castanet has joined forces with other local media companies in the Central Okanagan to present the Local Advertising Initiative. Many members of the initiative provide you with local news and entertainment, enriching the community and employing your neighbours.

“Locally bought advertising allows you to create a local presence through trusted local brands online, on-air and in print,” said Chris Kearney, Castanet senior vice president and Kelowna general manager.

“You won’t ever see Facebook and Google support charities and nonprofits like the Central Okanagan Food Bank or BC SPCA, but local media companies do.”

There is a wide variety of highly effective options to support local media organizations, including digital, radio, print, outdoor and event advertising.

Localizing your ads also allows you to make a personal connection with your ideal consumer, many of whom log onto their favourite websites, tune into the same radio stations, or view their favourite newscast every day.

That trust is powerful to customers.

To learn more about the Local Advertising Initiative, or to get involved, click here.

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