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Ethnic media's approach to election coverage similar to mainstream: analysis – CTV News

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OTTAWA —
 

An analysis of how ethnic media covered the federal election suggests their approach mirrored that of the mainstream press, findings the study’s author says highlight a key point about the so-called “ethnic vote” in Canada.

“One can’t assume nor should one assume that the ethnic vote in Canada is separate than the mainstream vote,” said Andrew Griffith, a former director of multiculturalism policy for the federal government.

Griffith undertook the analysis as part of an election effort called Diversity Votes, a project aimed at providing a deeper understanding of the ethnocultural makeup of the electoral map, and its implications.

The growing diversity of the Canadian electorate has seen the federal parties finding more ways to woo voters in specific ethnic groups, especially in ridings where single communities have enough voters to swing a race.

In the 2019 campaign, that took the form of everything from promises targeted directly to certain communities, ads in a variety of languages and, in a first, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh answering questions in Punjabi, which he speaks fluently.

But Griffith said that despite what the campaigns may have been trying to do, his findings show the ethnic press were covering the same issues as the mainstream media.

Ethics, relations with China and climate change were widely covered, as were the parties’ strategies and tactics, which he said was partially a reflection of the use of translated stories from the English or French press.

The Liberals and the Conservatives received equal coverage throughout the campaign. Before the race began in earnest in September, the People’s Party of Canada, along with its controversial positions on multiculturalism and immigration, received more coverage than the Greens or the NDP.

The NDP finally got a boost after the first English-language debate, where Singh was praised for his performance.

Singh’s candidacy marked a milestone in Canadian politics, as he is the first visible minority leader of a major political party. Still, Griffith said that Punjabi-language outlets, as well as those serving the Punjabi community in places like Singh’s home base of Brampton, Ont., focused far more on the local campaigns overall.

The 2019 election saw an increase of visible-minority candidates, with the biggest rise coming from the NDP.

In 2015, according to Griffith, 13 per cent of their candidates were visible minorities, and that rose to 22.9 per cent in 2019.

The number of ridings where visible minorities represented 50 per cent or more of the population rose from 33 per cent in 2015 to 41 per cent in 2019, according to census data he analysed.

Griffith’s review of media coverage examined 2,500 stories in outlets representing a variety of different language groups, as well as publications in English that cater nearly exclusively to specific communities.

The goal was to assess whether someone relying exclusively on the ethnic media would have a comparable understanding of the issues to those who rely on mainstream news outlets, and the research suggested they would.

“In other words, rather than ethnic media providing a parallel and separate space and reinforcing silos, ethnic media for the most part serves an important role in political integration through its coverage of the main political issues common to all Canadians,” the analysis concluded.

 

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on Dec. 18, 2019.

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Media Advisory: Premier Furey, Minister Coady and Minister Haggie to Announce Mandatory Vaccination Policy – News Releases – Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

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The Honourable Andrew Furey, Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Honourable Siobhan Coady, Deputy Premier and President of Treasury Board, and the Honourable John Haggie, Minister of Health and Community Services, will announce the province’s mandatory vaccination policy today (Friday, October 15) at 1:00 p.m. at the Media Centre, East Block, Confederation Building.

The event will be live-streamed on the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Facebook and YouTube accounts. Media covering the announcement will have the opportunity to join in person in the media centre or by teleconference. Media planning to attend this event should register with Jillian Hood (jillianhood@gov.nl.ca) by 11:00 a.m.

Technical Briefing

Prior to the event, a technical briefing for media will be held at 12:00 p.m.

Media attending the briefing will have the opportunity to join in person in the media centre or by teleconference. Media who wish to participate in the technical briefing should RSVP to Jillian Hood (jillianhood@gov.nl.ca), who will provide the details and the required information.

Media must join the teleconference at 11:45 a.m. (NST) to be included on the call. For sound quality purposes, registered media are asked to use a land line if at all possible.

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Media contacts
Meghan McCabe
Office of the Premier
709-729-3960
meghanmccabe@gov.nl.ca

Victoria Barbour
Treasury Board Secretariat
709-729-4087
victoriabarbour@gov.nl.ca

Lesley Clarke
Health and Community Services
709-729-6986, 699-2910
lesleyclarke@gov.nl.ca

2021 10 15
9:11 am

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In 2022 Mobile Will Replace Direct Mail As The Top Local Media Advertising Platform – Forbes

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In yet another sign that marketers are allocating more of the ad budget to digital media. In 2022, BIA projects for the first time, in the local marketplace, more ad dollars will be allocated to mobile than any other medium including direct mail.

As the ad marketplace continues to recover post-pandemic, BIA forecasts local media ad spend to total $161.5 billion, a year-over-year increase of 10.1%. In 2022, BIA still expects more ad dollars will be spent on traditional media ($84.6billion) than will digital media ($76.8 billion). Although BIA forecasts local digital ad spend to exceed local traditional media in 2023. The digital duopoly of Google ($26.8 billion) and Facebook ($14.3 billion) is projected to account for slightly over half of all digital ad dollars spent locally next year. In addition, with mid-term elections set for November 2022, BIA expects $7.5 billion in total political ad spend. 

Next year local ad spend for mobile is expected to reach $34.0 billion, accounting for 21% of all ad dollars. Direct Mail, which had been the leader in local ad spend for many years, is expected to total $33.4 billion (20.7%) in ad spend. BIA ad spend forecast for PC/laptop is forecast at $27.5 billion (17.1%). Local advertisers are projected to allocate $21.0 billion in 2022 (13.0%) for television. Rounding out the top five will be local radio at $12.7 billion (7.9%).

When local television ad spend is broken out, BIA projects terrestrial TV to garner $19.3 billion in ad dollars next year and an additional $1.7 billion being allocated toward digital. Overall, local television ad revenue will have a strong year-over-year increase of 26.5%. Helping to drive the growth for local TV will be the political dollars. BIA estimates that local broadcast TV will total $3.4 billion next year in political ad dollars, making it the largest product category for the medium.

Similarly, for local radio, a large majority of ad dollars are expected to be allocated to over-the-air ($11.0 billion) with $1.7 billion going to digital. Radio, which doesn’t get the political ad dollars that television receives, will still benefit as more employees commute to and from work.

In a press release Rick Ducey, managing director of BIA Advisory Services, points to four reasons why mobile has surpassed direct mail and is expected to be the top advertising medium in 2022 and beyond:

·       COVID’s impact on consumer’s increased time spent with mobile and other digital media making digital the place to find and target consumers.

·       Digital’s overall momentum in winning more revenue share of media time from traditional media.

·       The rise of virtual consumer channels like delivery, curbside pickup and e-commerce in top categories like retail, restaurants, CPG where physical channels like retail store visits decline.

·       Greater consumer acceptance and use of virtual and e-commerce channels.

The growth in mobile ad spend has been driven by the change in media habits begun during the pandemic. eMarketer recently released a report that said mobile now accounts for one-third of all screen time every day. In 2021 daily time spent with mobile (non-voice) is expected to average 4 hours and 23 minutes, compared to 3 hours and 45 minutes in 2019. eMarketer expects mobile usage to increase by six minutes in both 2022 and 2023. In addition, time spent with mobile will account for over half (54.8%) of the nearly eight hours U.S. adults spend daily with digital media.

Within mobile, smartphone usage is the largest. The daily time spent with smartphones is expected to reach three hours and ten minutes in 2021, compared to 2 hours and 34 minutes in 2019. Smart phones usage now accounts for nearly one-quarter of total media time spent. Among the reasons cited for the leap in smartphone usage has been social media consumption led by TikTok, podcasting, gaming and shopping.

Among the results from Mary Meeker’s latest annual Internet Trends report is that mobile has become the first screen. Meeker also noted that nowadays three-quarters of web users regularly shop online with younger age groups more likely to use a mobile device for e-commerce.

Additionally, with the roll-out of the high-speed 5G, viewing to streaming video on mobile devices is expected to increase.

BIA expects mobile will continue to generate the most local ad dollars of any platform in the upcoming years.

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FSJ RCMP responds to social media post | Energeticcity.ca – Local news from Northeast BC – Energeticcity.ca

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Constable Chad Neustaeter, Media Relations Officer for Fort St. John RCMP, says it would be appropriate to describe what was actually occurring. He says this same individual has been arrested for Mischief, Loss of Enjoyment to Property after the property owner reported the individual for busking, panhandling and making customers feel uncomfortable in late September.

The business owner knew the man had a court condition not to attend the property, and knowing the individual was breaching conditions of his release, called police.

“In this instance, a new frontline police officer to Fort St John was given the opportunity to work through the investigation process and was conducting police checks to determine if there were in fact conditions and what those conditions were in order to make an educated decision that was in everyone’s best interest,” said Neustaeter.

The author of the social media post asked the question ‘what are we paying them for?’ Neustaeter says officers were conducting a full investigation on behalf of the complainant.

“During the investigation, the man was apologetic to police. The lead investigating officer exercised discretion and released the man who said he would leave. The business was updated accordingly and were satisfied with the actions of police.”

Neustaeter says there is often more than meets the eye of the public when it comes to policing.

“In this case, the public also did not get a chance to see the conclusion when the man walked away and the business owner was satisfied.”

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