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AMD’s new Zen 3 Ryzen desktop CPUs arrive November 5

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AMD CEO Lisa Su holds up a Zen 3 CPU at today’s AMD Gaming event—most likely, a Ryzen 9 5900X or Ryzen 9 5950X.
AMD

At today’s AMD Gaming Event 2020, Team Red announced its next big thing in desktop CPUs—the Zen 3 powered Ryzen 5xxx series. The event was brief—only a half hour from start to finish—with AMD announcing record-breaking internal benchmark results.

AMD CEO Lisa Su, CTO Mark Papermaster, and Director of Technical Marketing Robert Hallock took turns extolling the new gear’s features. The trio paints a picture of more unrelenting pressure being laid on competitor Intel. According to AMD testing, raw performance, power efficiency, IPC, and single-threaded performance all increased markedly compared to current leading desktop processors from both AMD and Intel.

According to CTO Mark Papermaster, Zen 3—the architecture next month’s Ryzen lineup is based on—has been in development for over five years. Zen 3 features a new unified 8-core complex that allows each core in the cluster direct access to L3 cache. Papermaster declared that the new architecture sees a 19-percent instructions per clock cycle (IPC) uplift when compared with Zen 2.

Marketing Director Robert Hallock took the more direct approach, using charts generated from in-company benchmarks to show the Ryzen 9 5900X demolishing both AMD and Intel CPUs. The charts show Ryzen 9 5900X, at 105W TDP, delivering an average 26-percent gaming uplift (as measured in frames per second) when compared to Ryzen 9 3900XT.
Ryzen 9 5900X’s gaming uplift compared to Intel’s 125W i9-10900K was much smaller but still nearly unanimous—Battlefield V showed a minus-3-percent loss for the 5900X, with each of the other 10 games showing wins ranging from 1 percent to 21 percent.

Finally, Hallock showed the 5900X taking the single-threaded performance crown away from Intel: the 5900X scores 631 on single-threaded Cinebench R20, a significant boost from the i9-10900K’s score of 544.

For those who really care about thermals and power, we should also note that directly comparing the i9-10900K’s 125W TDP to AMD’s 105W TDPs can be pretty misleading. Although the difference between stated TDP is only 20 percenmt, we saw a 60-percent difference—336W vs 210W—in sustained, at-the-wall full-system power draw between an i9-10900K system and a Ryzen 9 3900XT system while running Cinebench R20 benchmarks. We also saw 30-percent lower desktop idle power draw, despite the Ryzen system having a discrete RTX 2060 GPU and the Intel system running on internal GPU only.

After showing internal benchmarks of the 5900X taking every remaining crown from the Intel competition—although, as Hallock wryly noted, “we know you’re going to wait for benchmarks”—Su took the stage again. She announced that the 5900X is not the highest-end part in the new lineup. The $800 Ryzen 9 5950X offers more cores and threads and a higher boost clock than the $550 5900X while maintaining the same 105W TDP.

The introduction of the 5950X late in the presentation finally explains why AMD was comparing the 5900X to the 3900XT, not to its fastest previous-generation desktop CPU—because that honor was reserved for the 5950X, which dominates the 3950X and Intel’s i9-10900K alike.

The Ryzen 9 5900X didn’t get to keep its single-threaded performance crown for long, either—AMD says the 5950X pulled a Cinebench R20 1T of 640, a little higher than the 5900X’s already record-breaking 631.

Su also briefly teased a Radeon 6000 series GPU, affectionately nicknamed “Big Navi,” along with short clips of 60+ FPS 4K triple-A gaming. The new GPU does not yet have a release date or official specifications.

AMD says that Ryzen 5000 CPUs are shipping to OEM partners today and will be globally available starting November 5.

Source:- Ars Technica

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Huawei Mate 30E Pro With Kirin 990E SoC Launched: Specifications – Gadgets 360

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Huawei Mate 30E Pro has been launched as an upgrade to the existing Mate 30 Pro. The new smartphone comes with Huawei’s HiSilicon Kirin 990E SoC, which is the latest chip in the Kirin family and is an advanced version of the earlier Kirin 990. The Huawei Mate 30E Pro also runs on EMUI 11 out-of-the-box, unlike the Mate 30 Pro that came with EMUI 10. Other specifications of the Mate 30E Pro are identical to those of the Mate 30 Pro.

Huawei Mate 30E Pro price

The Huawei Mate 30E Pro is currently available for pre-bookings in China. However, its pricing details are yet to be revealed. The phone also comes in four different colour options, namely Space Silver, Emerald Green, Cosmic Purple, and Black. There are also two additional shades along with a leather finish these are called the Vegan Leather Forest Green and Vegan Leather Orange.

Details about the global launch of the Huawei Mate 30E Pro are yet to be revealed.

Huawei Mate 30E Pro specifications

The dual-SIM (Nano) Huawei Mate 30E Pro runs on EMUI 11 based on Android 10 and features a 6.53-inch full-HD+ (1,176×2,400 pixels) OLED display with a 20:9 aspect ratio. The phone is powered by the HiSilicon Kirin 990E SoC, coupled with 14-core Mali-G76 GPU and 8GB of RAM. There is a Leica optics-equipped quad rear camera setup that houses a 40-megapixel primary sensor with an f/1.8 ultra-wide-angle lens, 40-megapixel secondary sensor with an f/1.6 wide-angle lens and optical image stabilisation (OIS), and an 8-megapixel tertiary sensor with an f/2.4 lens and OIS support. There is also a time-of-flight (ToF) sensor for depth sensing.

For selfies and video chats, the Huawei Mate 30E Pro comes with a 32-megapixel camera sensor at the front. The front-facing camera sensor features an f/2.0 lens and is paired with a 3D depth sensor.

The Huawei Mate 30E Pro comes in 128GB and 256GB storage options that both are expandable via microSD card (up to 256GB). Connectivity options include 5G, 4G LTE, Wi-Fi 802.11ac, Bluetooth v5.1, GPS/ A-GPS, Infrared (IR), NFC, and a USB Type-C port. Sensors on board include an accelerometer, ambient light, barometer, colour temperature, gyroscope, hall sensor, magnetometer, and a proximity sensor. There is also an in-display fingerprint sensor.

Huawei has provided a 4,500mAh battery on the Mate 30E Pro that supports up to 40W SuperCharge fast charging 27W fast wireless charging. The phone weighs 198 grams.


Why are smartphone prices rising in India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.

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iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: which should you buy? – What Hi-Fi?

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At first glance, you might think the image above shows the same phone in two different colours, but you are in fact looking at the new iPhone 12 on the left and the outgoing iPhone 11 on the right.

The initial similarities belie the fact that the iPhone 12 actually represents one of the most dramatic iPhone updates in years, particularly in one of the most important areas to us AV aficionados – the screen.

So what’s new? What makes it worth upgrading from the iPhone 11? And how do you do so? Here we’ll answer all your questions and more…

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: price

(Image credit: Apple)

First things first: price. As you would expect for a newer, more advanced phone, the iPhone 12 is more expensive than the iPhone 11. It currently starts at £799 ($799/AU$1349), while the iPhone 11 costs £599 ($599/AU$999).

There are different prices for the different models of iPhone 12. The iPhone 12 mini is the cheapest option, starting at £699 ($699, AU$1199), while the iPhone 12 Pro is more expensive, with a starting price of £999 ($999, AU$1699). The iPhone 12 Pro Max is the priciest member of the iPhone 12 family, starting at £1099 ($1099, AU$1849).

**Winner** iPhone 11

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: design

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: which should you buy?

(Image credit: Apple)

Both handsets look very similar from the front, but the iPhone 12‘s design is actually quite different to that of the iPhone 11, at least by Apple standards. The rounded edges have been replaced by smooth, flat aluminium, and it’s more compact, too: 11% thinner, 15% smaller in terms of volume, and 16% lighter.

It comes in five colours: black, white, red, green and blue. The iPhone 11 comes in six  (purple, yellow, green, black, white and red), so there’s not much to choose between them on this front. But for the design tweaks, we prefer the 12.

**Winner** iPhone 12

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: screen

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: which should you buy?

(Image credit: Apple)

The iPhone 12’s chassis is more compact but, thanks to thinner borders, the screen is the same size – 6.1in.

Spec-wise, it’s actually a big step-up from the iPhone 11’s display. For starters, it’s a Super Retina XDR OLED rather than a Liquid Retina HD LCD. Pixel density jumps from 326ppi to 460ppi, contrast ratio from 1400:1 to 2,000,000:1, and support for HDR (in the Dolby Vision, HDR10 and HLG formats) has been added. This is all massive news for those of us who use our phones primarily as portable TV show and movie machines.

Keeping that screen safe is something Apple refers to as a ‘Ceramic Shield’, which is apparently tougher than any smartphone glass. The company says it’s four times more likely than the iPhone 11’s screen to survive a fall without cracking. Let’s hope you never have to test that.

**Winner** iPhone 12

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: network speed

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: which should you buy?

(Image credit: Apple)

The iPhone 12 range sees Apple supporting 5G for the first time, which means that those with the appropriate contract and coverage will get a much faster data connection than with any previous iPhone. In perfect conditions, the iPhone 12 with 5G is capable of producing download speeds of up to 4Gbps, which is astonishingly quick.

Of course, real-life download speeds will be much lower. Verizon in the US is talking up 200Mbps as the ceiling and, in the UK, average 5G download speeds are currently under 40Mbps. That’s still much faster than 4G, though, so this is a useful feature to have and it will only become more so as the currently patchy coverage expands.

**Winner** iPhone 12

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: power

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: which should you buy?

(Image credit: Apple)

The A13 Bionic chip in the iPhone 11 still hasn’t been outperformed by the processor of any Android phone, but Apple has still seen fit to replace it with a more powerful chip for iPhone 12.

The A14 Bionic is the first smartphone chip built on 5nm process technology. Very simply put, the transistors on the chip are even infinitesimally smaller than before, which means a whole load more of them can be packed in, increasing performance and improving energy efficiency. There are, in fact, 11.8 billion transistors in the A14 Bionic – that’s nearly 40 per cent more than in the A13 Bionic.

Apple claims the A14 Bionic’s CPU (central processing unit) and GPU (graphics processing unit) are each 50 per cent faster than the equivalents of any other smartphone. The long and the short of it is that the iPhone 12 should be miles faster than the iPhone 11. You might not notice that in day-to-day use, but as more advanced apps and games appear, it could become a factor.

**Winner** iPhone 12

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: camera

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: which should you buy?

(Image credit: Apple)

The iPhone 12’s dual-camera array features the same Ultra Wide lens as the iPhone 11, but its Wide lens has been upgraded with a f/1.6 aperture, whereas the iPhone 11’s has an f/1.8 aperture. To the point-and-shooters out there, that might sound like a downgrade, but the smaller number actually means that the aperture is bigger and therefore able to draw in more light. The upshot should be better low-light photography.

On the subject of low-light photography, Apple’s Night Mode, which is specifically designed to maximise the amount of light in nighttime shots, can now be used in conjunction with all of the iPhone’s cameras, including the one on the front. Great for selfies after dark, if that’s your sort of thing.

On top of that, the iPhone 12 uses machine learning to analyse and enhance your shots, bringing out details that would usually be lost in shadows, for example. Better all round, in other words.

**Winner** iPhone 12

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: battery

iPhone 12 vs iPhone 11: which should you buy?

(Image credit: Apple)

There’s not much to choose between them in this category. The iPhone 12 squeezes out an extra hour of video playback over streaming, but that’s about it. Though there is one rather neat new addition in the form of MagSafe.

This is the same magnetic tech originally seen in Apple’s laptops. Then, it disconnected the power cable when pulled – if someone tripped over the charging cable, it would be yanked out, rather than dragging the laptop onto the floor and potentially causing it damage. But on the iPhone 12, it opens the door to all sorts of new chargers and accessories.

Wireless chargers just ‘snap’ into place, so you don’t have to worry about positioning them correctly. Just place it down and off you go. It also means you can charge all your Apple devices on one wireless charger – like Belkin’s, or Apple’s (pictured) – and  you’ll soon be able to ‘snap’ on all kinds of accessories to your handset, such as cases, new camera lenses, and more. The sky’s the limit.

MORE:

Everything you need to know: New iPhone 12 (2020): release date, price and news

Apple has a new speaker too: Apple HomePod Mini: everything you need to know

And some new headphones in the pipeline: Apple AirPods Studio headphones: everything you need to know

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Huawei Mate 40 Pro tops DxOMark charts for both front and rear cameras – GSMArena.com news – GSMArena.com

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Huawei unveiled the Mate 40, Mate 40 Pro, Mate 40 Pro+, and Porsche Design Mate 40 RS today, but it seems like every media outlet was only sent the Mate 40 Pro, just like what initially happened with the P40 family. So we have our Mate 40 Pro review out already, but so does DxOMark, and the new device has entered its charts at No.1 both for its rear camera system as well as its selfie prowess.

For the rear cams, the Mate 40 Pro takes the crown from the Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra, while for selfies it’s a family affair, with the previous record holder being the Huawei P40 Pro.

If you’re interested in the nitty gritty of DxOMark’s testing, make sure you visit both Sources linked below. We’ll give you a quick rundown of their findings, starting with the rear camera setup.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro tops DxOMark charts for both front and rear cameras

Let’s start by saying that the Mate 40 Pro’s photo subscore of 140 is a new high as well. DxOMark was particularly impressed with the handset’s dynamic range, which is very wide across all light levels, even in very challengingly lit situations. Obviously, this means the it’s a great option for shooting in low-light.

Main cam sample from DxOMark
Main cam sample from DxOMark

The camera also offers a good tradeoff between texture and noise, with good detail and low noise across all ambient light levels. Autofocus on the main cam is accurate and delay-free, while the portrait mode creates natural-looking bokeh that’s pretty similar looking to what you can get from a DSLR and fast lens. Color rendering is excellent too.

Tele sample from DxOMark
Tele sample from DxOMark

Autofocus on the tele lens is a bit hit-and-miss, and the phone would’ve benefitted from having a second zoom lens with a shorter range, like the Mate 40 Pro+ and the Mi 10 Ultra. The ultrawide camera is very good in terms of quality, but it’s also one of the narrowest ultrawides out there.

Ultrawide sample from DxOMark
Ultrawide sample from DxOMark

The Mate 40 Pro also takes the top spot with its video subscore of 116, with good detail and low noise levels in all situations. Colors are nice, auto white balance works well, autofocus is accurate and adapts smoothly when the subject distance changes, and video stabilization is very good, creating a cinematic effect, which is particularly noticeable when panning or running while recording. It only struggles while walking when recording in low light, which is also when you may see sharpness differences between frames.

Huawei Mate 40 Pro tops DxOMark charts for both front and rear cameras

Flipping the phone over reveals a selfie snapper which delivers good face exposures including in low light levels, and it also has a wide dynamic range. This is very useful in backlit situations, and other high contrast scenes. Colors are nice, while white balance is good in low light but can be slightly inaccurate in other conditions.

Selfie sample from DxOMark
Selfie sample from DxOMark

Despite its fixed focus, the camera scores highly for focusing, and it has a wide depth of field, although there’s an understandable reduction in detail in low light. Noise is good in all conditions. When it gets very dark you can use the display flash, which produces good exposures but is prone to vignetting.

Portrait selfie sample from DxOMark
Portrait selfie sample from DxOMark

Portrait mode creates nice looking bokeh but despite the ToF depth sensor, estimation errors are frequent on the edges of the subject. Selfie videos have good exposure in most conditions and nice colors with accurate white balance. There’s some loss of detail in low light, while noise is visible in indoor and low-light clips.

Source 1 | Source 2

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