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Apple Leak Reveals Radical New MacBook – Forbes

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Apple may be preparing to update the 13-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pro machines to Intel’s tenth-generation processors, but its longstanding project to bring ARM power to its MacOS platform gathers pace, with reports today that a release in 2021 is on the cards.

A number of chips are under development. The first is based on the A14 system on chip that will be fitted to the iPhone 12 smartphone family and is expected to be the first to be launched. A second-generation chip, potentially with extra commuting power for more demanding applications, is also under way.

The reporting comes from Mark Gurman, Debby Wu, and Ian King at Bloomberg:

Apple is preparing to release at least one Mac with its own chip next year, according to the people. But the initiative to develop multiple chips, codenamed Kalamata, suggests the company will transition more of its Mac lineup away from current supplier Intel Corp.

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., Apple’s partner for iPhone and iPad processors, will build the new Mac chips, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing private product plans. The components will be based on a 5-nanometer production technique, the same size Apple will use in the next iPhones and iPad Pros, one of the people said. An Apple spokesman declined to comment, as did Intel and TSMC.

This is not a quick or easy project, but there are some advantages if the move is successful.

Probably the biggest one will be reducing Intel’s influence on Apple’s product line. The pace of Intel’s updates is not on an annual schedule, which leaves the Mac family of laptops and desktops waiting on the new chips from Intel, rather than fitting into Apple’s regimented yearly cycle seen in the iPhone and iPad platforms.

That sits on top of having Intel as an external point of failure. Apple has no issue with iPhone processors, as witnessed by the regular annual updates to the Axx silicon. But there have been multiple issues with sourcing 5G modems from external suppliers. When Intel stopped its 5G efforts, that left Apple beholden to Qualcomm for the next few years.

(In the meantime, Apple bought Intel’s 5G modem division to bring it in-house, with the view to using Qualcomm as a stop-gap).

A unified approach around the Axx architecture for iOS, iPadOS, and MacOS offers a number of benefits of scale. Resources can be focused and better managed, Apple can choose its own path and try to shape the market to its own desire, and MacOS machines could switch to a regular update cycle, potentially annually for the lower end laptops, bi-annually for the Pro laptops, and every three years for the desktop power-houses. 

It’s possible to argue that Apple already has an ARM-based laptop. Okay the screen and the keyboard detach from each other, but the iPad Pro and Magic keyboard combination is being heavily pushed by Apple into the ‘your next computer’ space.

The key difference with an ‘iPadOS laptop’ and MacOS machine is that Apple has far more control over the iPadOS platform, what applications can run on it, and can take a rake over any and all payments through the platform as it sees fit.

The move to ARM will bring with it the same headaches faced by any manufacturer changing architecture; developers will be dealing with a new environment, and applications will need recompiled or recoded for the new chips.

New app development will be in a better situation with Apple. There is already a wealth of experience in the ecosystem thanks to the use of ARM on the iPhone and iPad. That will make a transition from Intel to ARM smoother. There is an additional benefit that coders who have stayed with iOS and not made the jump to MacOS may now be tempted over.

The ‘hard break’ from Intel to ARM means that existing applications will not be able to run natively on the new MacBook machines. Apple could run an emulation layer to allow a virtual Intel machine, but I wonder if Tim Cook and his team would take a more ruthless approach and say that there will be no hand-holding – if developers want apps to run on the new machines then they will need to code native ARM apps.

After all, Cook took the same approach when MacOS Catalina removed 32-bit support… it was the 64-bit way or the highway.

Previous reports suggested a launch date of late 2020 or early 2021. Given the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, Apple is widely believed to be focusing on keeping the iPhone 12 on schedule, which will see other products slip back. With the challenges of the Intel to ARM switch, it makes sense for these Mac machines to arrive late.

Now read more about Apple’s ridiculous price for a set of wheels…

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Apple parts supplier Broadcom says 2020 iPhone launch will be delayed – MobileSyrup

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While there’s no official statement from Apple regarding a possible delay of the tech giant’s 2020 iPhone, Bloomberg has reported that Broadcom CEO Hock Tan’s comments during the company’s recent quarterly earnings call indicate that the Cupertino, California-based tech giant’s next smartphone will be pushed back by a few weeks.

Apple typically releases its new iPhone in early September. Delaying the 2020 iPhone’s release date by even a few weeks would result in a significant financial impact on Apple and its various parts suppliers.

During the earnings call, Tan referenced that a “large North American mobile phone customer” that normally contributes “double-digit” revenue towards Broadcom’s bottom line is not expected to contribute to an “uptick in revenue until our fourth fiscal quarter.” Tan indicated during the call that Broadcom is still providing parts for the upcoming iPhone, but stated that the timing of the smartphone’s launch is still up in the air.

It’s likely that the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has caused supply line delays for Apple. The fact that travel has been disrupted and many Apple employees are working from home could also contribute to a delay.

Back in late March, a report from Japanese publication Nikkei stated that Apple could delay the release of the iPhone 12 “by months.” That said, at the time, Bloomberg also reported that the next iPhone was still on track to release this fall.

The iPhone 12 is expected to feature 5G for the first time — which won’t mean much in Canada given the limited availability of the next-generation of network technology — a faster A14 processor and a new 3D camera system similar to the liDAR sensor included in the iPad Pro (2020).

Source: Bloomberg

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Poll: Clubhouse Games: 51 Worldwide Classics Is Out Today On Switch, Are You Getting It? – Nintendo Life

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Today sees the latest Nintendo-published title, Clubhouse Games: 51 Worldwide Classics (or 51 Worldwide Games as it’s known in Europe) launching on Switch, so we thought it’d be nice to see just how many of you lovely lot are thinking of picking it up.

As you may be aware, the game is actually a successor to Clubhouse Games (known as 42 All-Time Classics in Europe) on Nintendo DS. This new entry includes 51 games, obviously, as well as a piano for some reason, all of which are listed below.

Clubhouse Games 51

In our review, we highlighted the fact that the new game contains such a wide enough variety of board, card and action games that you’re sure to find a number that will appeal to you. The presentation is perhaps the icing on the cake, too, going well above and beyond what you’d usually see in what is essentially a minigame compilation-style release.

So, over to you. Are you planning on buying Clubhouse Games: 51 Worldwide Classics?

If you haven’t yet ordered your copy, you can grab a physical version of the game below. Feel free to expand upon your answer in the comments!

Please note that some links on this page are affiliate links, which means if you click them and make a purchase we may receive a small percentage of the sale. Please read our FTC Disclosure for more information.

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iPhone 13 design kills the notch and adds USB-C — but don't get too excited – Tom's Guide

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A iPhone 13 prototype has supposedly been leaked. But while this 5.5-inch device looks interesting, one prominent leaker has already slapped down the report’s accuracy.

The original source is MacOtakara, which published a story about some alleged iPhone 13 3D printed mockups, which allegedly shows what a 2021 iPhone could look like. It’s this story that leaker Jon Prosser responded to on Twitter with the fantastically blunt answer: “lol no.” 

MacOtakara claims that the designs for these 3D prints came from a source at online retailer Alibaba. This particular model has a 5.5-inch display, and is supposedly the successor to this year’s smallest iPhone 12 model, which measures 5.4 inches according to leaks.

The clearest change here is that there is no longer a front camera notch, which has been present from the iPhone X to the iPhone 11, and is likely coming to the iPhone 12, too. MacOtakara suggests that there will be an under-display selfie camera instead, as well as potentially a camera at the bottom of the screen.

(Image credit: MacOtakara)

We know under-display cameras are on their way, with Samsung, Oppo and Xiaomi all looking into the technology for their 2021 phones. But we’d be surprised if Apple immediately adopted this new tech as well.

If Apple was to move its cameras beneath the display, it would have to factor in how it would affect Face ID. The infrared sensor could be located in the bottom camera previously mentioned, or Apple could decide to go for an under-display fingerprint scanner like many of its rivals. But we definitely don’t see Apple abandoning Face ID.

iPhone 13 mockup

(Image credit: MacOtakara)

A shot of the mockup phone’s bottom shows that the Lightning connector has been swapped for a more standard USB-C one. This is in contradiction to other rumors that have claimed that one iPhone 13 will be Apple’s first portless phone, with the company looking to avoid using USB-C on iPhones.

The back of the phone shows a very odd camera bump with five tiny holes. MacOtakara explained that this is likely a modular system to help designers test multiple camera designs more easily. Rumors for the iPhone 13’s camera array seem to be split between whether it will have four cameras – like the iPhone 12 Pro is expected to have – or if Apple will try and add more sensors outside of the main square patch.

iPhone 13 mockup

(Image credit: MacOtakara)

MacOtakara did say that this is only a prototype model and therefore could be very different from the real iPhone 13, if it does indeed exist. However, the fact this prototype differs so widely from other leaks we’ve heard makes it hard to believe.

It’s still over a year until we’ll likely see the iPhone 13 debut in fall 2021. However the iPhone 12 is expected to be revealed around September or October this year. 

We know a lot more about the iPhone 12 than next year’s model, including its four different models, 5G connectivity, OLED displays (with 120Hz refresh rates on the Pro models), new A14 chipsets and camera arrangements – two rear cameras on the iPhone 12 and 12 Max, and four on the iPhone 12 Pro and 12 Pro Max, including a LiDAR sensor like the one seen on the iPad Pro 2020.

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