Connect with us

Economy

Asia shares spooked by U.S. inflation scare, hope for Fed calm

Published

 on

Asian shares slipped to seven-week lows on Thursday after a dismaying rise in U.S. inflation bludgeoned Wall Street and sent bond yields surging on worries the Federal Reserve might have to move early on tightening.

“Higher inflation is a definite negative for equities, given the likely rates response,” said Deutsche Bank macro strategist Alan Ruskin.

“The more nominal GDP gains are dominated by higher inflation, especially wage inflation, the more the possible squeeze on profit margins. It plays to a more choppy, less bullish equity bias.”

MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan lost 0.6%, though trade was thinned by holidays in a number of countries.

Japan’s Nikkei fell 1.8%, and touched its lowest since early January, while Chinese blue chips lost 0.7%.

Asian markets were already on the backfoot this week amid inflation worries and a tech sell-off on Wall Street, and nerves were further jangled on Wednesday when Taiwan stocks tumbled on fears the island could face a partial lockdown amid an outbreak of the virus.

Nasdaq futures were trying to rally with a gain of 0.5%, while S&P 500 futures added 0.4%. But EUROSTOXX 50 futures were still catching up with overnight falls and lost 0.5%, while FTSE futures shed 0.3%.

Wall Street was blindsided when data showed U.S. consumer prices jumped by the most in nearly 12 years in April as booming demand amid a reopening economy met supply constraints at home and abroad.

The jump was largely due to outsized increases in airfares, used cars and lodging costs, which were all driven by the pandemic and likely transitory.

Fed officials were quick to play down the impact of one month’s numbers, with vice chair Richard Clarida saying stimulus would still be needed for “some time”.

“It likely would take a very strong May jobs report, with sizable upward revisions to March and especially April, to get the Fed to start a discussion about tapering at its June meeting,” said JPMorgan economist Michael S. Hanson.

“We continue to expect the Fed to begin scaling back its pace of asset purchases early next year.”

Investors reacted by pricing in an 80% chance of a Fed rate hike as early as December next year.

Yields on 10-year Treasuries steadied at 1.68%, having climbed 7 basis points overnight in the biggest daily rise in two months. The yield curve also steepened markedly.

That was a shot in the arm for the dollar, which had been buckling under the weight of rapidly expanding U.S. budget and trade deficits. The euro retreated to $1.2082, leaving behind a 10-week peak at $1.2180.

The dollar stood at 109.60 yen, having hit a five-week top of 109.78 and well off this week’s low of 108.34. The dollar index hovered at 90.672, up from a 10-week trough of 89.979.

In the crypto currency space, Bitcoin steadied after sliding more than 10% when Elon Musk tweeted that Tesla Inc has suspended the use of bitcoin to purchase its vehicles.

The rise in yields and the dollar pressured gold, which was left at $1,819 an ounce and off a multiple-top around $1,845. [GOL/]

Oil prices backed away from two-month highs, hit after U.S. crude exports plunged and the International Energy Agency (IEA) said demand was already outstripping supply. [O/R]

Brent was off 46 cents at $68.86 a barrel, while U.S. crude lost 47 cents to $65.61.

 

(Editing by Sam Holmes & Shri Navaratnam)

Continue Reading

Economy

G7 nations to boost climate finance

Published

 on

G7 leaders agreed on Sunday to raise their contributions to meet an overdue spending pledge of $100 billion a year by rich countries to help poorer countries cut carbon emissions and cope with global warming, but only two nations offered firm promises of more cash.

Alongside plans billed as helping speed infrastructure funding in developing countries and a shift to renewable and sustainable technology, the world’s seven largest advanced economies again pledged to meet the climate finance target.

But climate groups said the promise made in the summit’s final communique lacked detail and the developed nations should be more ambitious in their financial commitments.

In the communique, the seven nations – the United States, Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy and Japan – reaffirmed their commitment to “jointly mobilise $100 billion per year from public and private sources, through to 2025”.

“Towards this end, we commit to each increase and improve our overall international public climate finance contributions for this period and call on other developed countries to join and enhance their contributions to this effort.”

After the summit concluded, Canada said it would double its climate finance pledge to C$5.3 billion ($4.4 billion) over the next five years and Germany would increase its by 2 billion to 6 billion euros ($7.26 billion) a year by 2025 at the latest.

There was a clear push by leaders at the summit in southwest England to try to counter China’s increasing influence in the world, particularly among developing nations. The leaders signalled their desire to build a rival to Beijing’s multi-trillion-dollar Belt and Road initiative but the details were few and far between.

Johnson, host of the gathering in Carbis Bay, told a news conference that developed nations had to move further, faster.

“G7 countries account for 20% of global carbon emissions, and we were clear this weekend that action has to start with us,” he said as the summit concluded.

“And while it’s fantastic that every one of the G7 countries has pledged to wipe out our contributions to climate change, we need to make sure we’re achieving that as fast as we can and helping developing countries at the same time.”

PLEDGE OVERDUE

Some green groups were unimpressed with the climate pledges.

Catherine Pettengell, director at Climate Action Network, an umbrella group for advocacy organisations, said the G7 had failed to rise to the challenge of agreeing on concrete commitments on climate finance.

“We had hoped that the leaders of the world’s richest nations would come away from this week having put their money their mouth is,” she said.

Developed countries agreed at the United Nations in 2009 to together contribute $100 billion each year by 2020 in climate finance to poorer countries, many of whom are grappling with rising seas, storms and droughts made worse by climate change.

That target was not met, derailed in part by the coronavirus pandemic that also forced Britain to postpone the U.N. Climate Change Conference (COP26) until later this year.

The G7 also said 2021 should be a “turning point for our planet” and to accelerate efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions and keep the 1.5 Celsius global warming threshold within reach.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said the G7 leaders had agreed to phase out coal.

The communique seemed less clear, saying: “We have committed to rapidly scale-up technologies and policies that further accelerate the transition away from unabated coal capacity, consistent with our 2030 NDCs and net zero commitment.”

The also pledged to work together to tackle so-called carbon leakage – the risk that tough climate policies could cause companies to relocate to regions where they can continue to pollute cheaply.

But there were few details on how they would manage to cut emissions, with an absence of specific measures on everything from the phasing out of coal to moving to electric vehicles.

Pettengell said it was encouraging that leaders were recognising the importance of climate change but their words had to be backed up by specific action on cutting subsidies for fossil fuel development and ending investment in projects such as new oil and gas fields, as well as on climate finance.

British environmentalist David Attenborough appealed to politicians to take action.

“We know in detail what is happening to our planet, and we know many of the things we need to do during this decade,” he said in a recorded video address to the meeting.

“Tackling climate change is now as much a political and communications challenge as it is a scientific or technological one. We have the skills to address it in time, all we need is the global will to do so.”

($1 = 1.2153 Canadian dollars)

(Reporting by Elizabeth PiperAdditional reporting by William James and Kate Abnett in Brussels and Andreas Rinke in BerlinEditing by William Maclean, Raissa Kasolowsky and Frances Kerry)

Continue Reading

Economy

Canadian dollar goes up from Friday’s 4-week low

Published

 on

Canadian dollar

The Canadian dollar edged higher against its U.S. counterpart on Monday as oil prices climbed and investors looked past domestic data showing factory sales falling in April, with the loonie clawing back some of Friday’s decline.

Canadian factory sales decreased by 2.1% in April from March, Statistics Canada said. Still, sales were up 1.1% after excluding vehicles and parts.

“Zooming out from the disruptions seen in the auto industry, the outlook for manufacturing sales is not all that bad,” Omar Abdelrahman, an economist at TD Economics, said in a note.

“The reopening of provincial economies and strength in Canada‘s largest export market (the U.S.) should provide a lift to demand,” Abdelrahman added.

The price of oil, one of Canada‘s major exports, was supported by economic recovery.

U.S. crude prices rose 0.9% to $71.56 a barrel, while the Canadian dollar was trading 0.2% higher at 1.2143 to the greenback, or 82.35 U.S. cents. On Friday, it fell to its weakest since May 14 at 1.2177.

Speculators have cut their bullish bets on the Canadian dollar, the strongest G10 currency this year, data from the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission showed on Friday. As of June 8, net long positions had fallen to 45,281 contracts from 48,772 in the prior week.

A stronger Canadian dollar is usually seen hurting exporters, but the nature of the global economic recovery could help firms pass on their higher costs from the currency to customers, leaving exporters in less pain than in previous cycles.

Investors were awaiting a Federal Reserve policy announcement on Wednesday. Expectations that the Fed would stick to its dovish course have helped cap U.S. and Canadian bond yields.

Canada‘s 10-year yield touched its lowest level since March 3 at 1.365% before recovering to 1.381%, up 1.3 basis points on the day.

 

(Reporting by Fergal Smith; Editing by Bernadette Baum)

Continue Reading

Economy

Toronto stock exchange dips as losses in miners

Published

 on

Toronto Stock Exchange

Toronto stock exchange index edged lower on Monday, as losses in mining stocks and dismal domestic manufacturing data overshadowed gains in energy stocks.

* The materials sector, which includes precious and base metals miners and fertilizer companies, lost 0.7% as gold futures fell 1.6% to $1,848.2 an ounce. [GOL/]

* Canadian factory sales slipped by 2.1% in April from March on lower sales of transportation equipment, as well as subdued petroleum and coal products sector, Statistics Canada said.

* At 9:43 a.m. ET (13:43 GMT), the Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index was down 14.52 points, or 0.07%, at 20,123.83.

* The energy sector climbed 1.4% as U.S. crude prices were up 1% a barrel, while Brent crude rose 0.9%. [O/R]

* Financials slipped 0.3%, while industrials fell 0.1%.

* On the TSX, 120 issues were higher, while 107 issues declined for a 1.12-to-1 ratio favouring gainers, with a trading volume of 22.35 million shares.

* TSX’s top gainers were paper and packaging company Cascades Inc <CAS.TO> and IT firm Kinaxis Inc <KXS.TO>, jumping 4.1% and 4.0%, respectively.

* Biggest decliners were uranium producers Nexgen Energy Ltd <NXE.TO>, down 5.9%, followed by Cameco Corp falling 5.5%.

* The most heavily traded shares by volume were Canadian Natural Resources Limited <CNQ.TO>, BCE Inc <BCE.TO>, and Hut 8 Mining Corp <HUT.TO>

* Twenty-two stocks hit fresh 52-week highs on the TSX, while there were no new lows.

* Across all Canadian issues, there were 95 new 52-week highs and four new lows, with total volume of 43.57 million shares.

 

(Reporting by Amal S in Bengaluru; Editing by Rashmi Aich)

Continue Reading

Trending