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B.C. man takes LifeLabs to court over data breach in proposed class action lawsuit – Global News

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A day after LifeLabs announced a data breach that potentially impacts up to 15 million Canadians, one of those patients is taking the company to court in a proposed class-action lawsuit.

In a notice of civil claim filed in B.C. Supreme Court Wednesday, Kenneth Morrison argues LifeLabs breached the contract it signs with all customers to keep their private information secure and confidential.

Morrison, a retired Vancouver computer technician who has been a customer since 2014, claims the company “failed to treat privacy and security as its top priorities” and did not take proper care to protect the private information from a breach.


READ MORE:
LifeLabs reveals data breach, possibly affecting up to 15 million Canadians

“As a result of the storage breach, the [customers], including the plaintiff, have been exposed to a real and substantial risk of identity theft, cybercrime, phishing, extortion and further disclosure of their highly sensitive medical information,” the lawsuit reads.

The lawsuit is open to any B.C. resident who was a customer of LifeLabs before Dec. 17, 2019.

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Morrison’s lawyer, David Aaron, declined to comment on the case or on whether anyone else has signed on to the lawsuit.

LifeLabs has 21 days to file a response to the lawsuit’s claims, which have not been proven in court.






3:12
LifeLabs data breach could impact up to 15m customers


LifeLabs data breach could impact up to 15m customers

The company, which performs medical lab tests, apologized for the security breach in a statement, adding that it was first discovered several weeks ago.

Compromised information includes health card numbers, names, email addresses, logins, passwords and dates of birth.

While the company is still determining exactly how many people were affected, it said the majority are from Ontario and B.C.


READ MORE:
LifeLabs hack: What Canadians need to know about the health data breach

The company said it hired cybersecurity experts to secure the system and determine the scope of the attack, and paid an undisclosed amount of money as ransom to secure the information.

Morrison’s lawsuit claims LifeLabs’ contract with its customers includes a promise that personal information will be destroyed or deleted “as soon as it is reasonable to assume” that the information is no longer needed.

The lawsuit argues LifeLabs failed to keep that promise, and was “reckless in its conduct amounting to the storage breach.”

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3:24
Cyberattack compromises data of 15 million LifeLabs customers


Cyberattack compromises data of 15 million LifeLabs customers

“At all material times, LifeLabs owed [customers], including the plaintiff, a common law duty of care with respect to the secure storage of the personal information to prevent unauthorized access, collection, use, disclosure and copying,” the lawsuit reads.

“Given the sensitivity of the personal information, [LifeLabs] should have had the strongest encryption and security measures in place and should have been diligent with respect to the destruction of personal information where retention was not longer necessary or permitted.”

Morrison is seeking an untold amount in damages for himself and anyone else who signs on to the suit.


READ MORE:
More than 28 million Canadians impacted by a data breach in past 12 months: privacy watchdog

The company has set up a phone line specifically to handle related inquiries.

LifeLabs also said Tuesday that customers concerned about the safety of their data will be able to receive “one free year of protection that includes dark web monitoring and identity theft insurance.”

—With files from Maham Abedi

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Oil Prices Under Pressure As Gasoline Inventories Climb

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The American Petroleum Institute (API) reported on Tuesday a draw in crude oil inventories of 831,000 barrels for the week ending September 25 – but this draw was more than offset by a build in gasoline inventories.

Analysts had predicted an inventory draw of 2.325-million barrels.

In the previous week, the API reported a small build in crude oil inventories of 691,000 barrels, after analysts had predicted a draw of 2.256 million barrels.

Oil prices were trading down sharply on Tuesday afternoon before the API’s data release as the market continues to be spooked by the rising number of coronavirus cases around the world – a factor that could lead to decreased movements and industrial activity around the world, and ultimately, to decreased oil demand.

In the hours leading up to Tuesday’s data release, at 12:44 pm EDT, WTI had fallen by $2.00 (-4.93%) to $38.60, down $1 per barrel on the week. The Brent crude benchmark had fallen by $1.82 at that time (-4.29%) to $40.61.

Oil production in the United States fell during the last week, and it is still down significantly from a high of 13.1 million bpd on March 13. U.S. oil production currently sits at 10.7 million bpd, according to the Energy Information Administration – 2.4 million bpd under those March highs.

 

The API reported a build in gasoline inventories of 1.623 million barrels of gasoline for the week ending September 25 – compared to the previous week’s 7.735-million-barrel draw. Analysts had expected a much smaller 648,000-barrel draw for the week.

Distillate inventories were down by 3.424 million barrels for the week, compared to last week’s 2.104-million-barrel draw, while Cushing inventories rose by 1.610 million barrels.

At 4:36 pm EDT, the WTI benchmark was trading at $38.99 while Brent crude was trading at $40.76.

 

Source:- OilPrice.com

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COVID-19 on flights: More trips added to B.C.’s exposure warning list

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VANCOUVER —
Several more flights have been added to B.C.’s COVID-19 exposure list, with passengers being warned they should self-monitor for symptoms of the disease.

The B.C. Centre for Disease Control posted details about the latest flights Monday evening. All four are domestic and either departed from or landed at Vancouver International Airport.

The flights most recently added to the BCCDC’s list are:

  • Sept. 18 – Air Canada flight 122 from Vancouver to Toronto (rows 13 to 19)
  • Sept. 19 – Air Canada flight 303 from Montreal to Vancouver (rows four to eight)
  • Sept. 22 – Air Canada flight 304 from Vancouver to Montreal (rows 22 to 28)
  • Sept. 24 – Air Canada flight 123 from Toronto to Vancouver (rows 20 to 24)

Passengers seated in the specified rows may be at a greater risk of exposure to the coronavirus, the BCCDC says.

More than 50 flights have been added to the BCCDC’s exposure warning list so far this month. Last week, Health Canada said there was no confirmed COVID-19 transmission on domestic flights within Canada, or on international flights to or from Canada.

Health officials in B.C. no longer directly contact people who were seated near someone with a confirmed case of COVID-19. Instead, health authorities post notices online about flights with confirmed cases.

Source: – CTV News Vancouver

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COVID-19 in B.C.: Vancouver care home dealing with second outbreak – CTV News Vancouver

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VANCOUVER —
A second outbreak of COVID-19 has been declared at a West End seniors’ home.

Haro Park Seniors Centre said in an email to families Tuesday that a resident from the Amber Lane area tested positive for the disease at St. Paul’s Hospital.

The care home says there are currently no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the building.

“As a result of the outbreak being declared, we will be in full outbreak protocols as we were in the spring,” the email from the care home reads.

Haro Park says its team is fully stocked with personal protective equipment and disinfecting products and says it is “well prepared.”

All social visits from family are suspended until further notice.

A previous outbreak of the coronavirus at Haro Park was declared over in May. Eleven residents died and dozens more got sick after the first case at the facility was detected and announced on March 18.

At the time, provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry described the outbreak as one of B.C.’s “first and most difficult care facility outbreaks.”

On Monday, Henry announced three new health-care facility outbreaks had been detected, including a second outbreak at Holy Family Hospital. Health officials said there were 13 active outbreaks in long-term care or assisted living facilities and three in acute care facilities.

Tuesday’s COVID-19 update will be delivered in a written statement sometime in the afternoon.

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