Connect with us

News

Canada denies role in detention, torture of former Guantanamo Bay detainee

Published

 on

OTTAWA — The federal government denies Canada supplied faulty information that contributed to the detention and torture of a man who was held at Guantanamo Bay for 14 years.

In a statement of defence filed in Federal Court, the attorney general of Canada says events that befell Mohamedou Ould Slahi were exclusively the result of actions and decisions of foreign officials.

Slahi filed a lawsuit last year over Canada’s alleged role in his detention at the U.S. offshore military prison in Cuba, where he says he suffered beatings, sleep deprivation and sexual assault.

Slahi, a Mauritanian citizen with permanent resident status in Canada, lived in Montreal in late 1999 and early 2000 upon moving from Germany.

He left Canada after Canadian authorities started questioning him about supposed ties to Ahmed Ressam, the so-called millennium bomber who planned to attack the Los Angeles airport.

Slahi’s amended statement of claim says surveillance during his brief period in Montreal pushed him to return to West Africa, setting off a lengthy pattern of arrests, interrogations and imprisonment.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 20, 2023.

 

The Canadian Press

News

Calgary loosening outdoor water restrictions as extreme heat continues

Published

 on

EDMONTON – Calgary residents can now turn on their sprinklers for longer as the city swelters under an extreme heat warning.

Mayor Jyoti Gondek says outdoor watering restrictions may be fully lifted within days, but for now residents can turn on their hoses for up to two hours twice a week to water grass and outdoor plants.

Michael Thompson, Calgary’s infrastructure services general manager, says operational pump issues have been fixed, but other mechanical problems need to be resolved before the city can give the full green light.

He says the city’s water system is approaching 75 per cent capacity, but how it can meet that demand depends on usage.

Outdoor watering restrictions have been in place since a catastrophic water main break on June 5, with a ban on all outdoor water use loosened last week.

Voluntary restrictions on indoor water use were lifted three weeks ago.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 23, 2024.

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



Source link

Continue Reading

News

Tesla’s 2Q profit falls 45% to $1.48 billion as sales drop despite price cuts and low-interest loans

Published

 on

DETROIT (AP) — Tesla’s second-quarter net income fell 45% compared with a year ago as the company’s global electric vehicle sales tumbled despite price cuts and low-interest financing.

The Austin, Texas, company said Tuesday that it made $1.48 billion from April through June, less than the $2.7 billion it made in the same period of 2023. It was Tesla’s second-straight quarterly net income decline.

Second quarter revenue rose 2% to $25.5 billion, beating Wall Street estimates of $24.54 billion, according to FactSet. Excluding one time items, Tesla made 52 cents per share, below analyst expectations of 61 cents.

Earlier this month Tesla said it sold 443,956 vehicles from April through June, down 4.8% from 466,140 sold the same period a year ago. Although the sales were were better than the 436,000 that analysts had expected, they still were a sign of weakening demand for the company’s aging product lineup.

For the first half of the year, Tesla has sold about 831,000 vehicles worldwide, far short of the more than 1.8 million for the full year that CEO Elon Musk has predicted.

The company’s widely watched gross profit margin, the percentage of revenue it gets to keep after expenses, fell once again to 18%. A year ago it was 18.2%, and it peaked at 29.1% in the first quarter of 2022.

Tesla said it posted record quarterly revenue “despite a difficult operating environment.” The company’s energy-storage business took in just over $3 billion in revenue, double the amount in the same period last year.

Shares of Tesla fell 4% in trading after Tuesday’s closing bell. The shares had been down more than 40% earlier in the year, but have since recovered most of the losses.

Revenue from regulatory credits purchased by other automakers who can’t meet government emissions targets hit $890 million for the quarter, double Tesla’s amount of most previous quarters.

The company reported $622 million in “restructuring and other” expenses for the quarter, when it laid off over 10% of its workforce.

Tesla said in a note to investors that it’s between two major growth waves, with the next one coming through advances in autonomous vehicles and new models. But the company reiterated caution that its sales growth “may be notably lower than the growth rate achieved in 2023.”

The company said plans for new vehicles, including more affordable models, are on track for production to start in the first half of next year. Tesla has hinted at a smaller model costing around $25,000. The models are to be built using some aspects of current vehicles and others from the next-generation underpinnings.

The company said average selling prices for its Models S, X, 3 and Y all dropped due to the price cuts and financing offers. It also said that the Cybertruck became the best selling electric pickup in the U.S. during the quarter.

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



Source link

Continue Reading

News

CN Rail lowers 2024 earnings forecast due to strike uncertainty

Published

 on

 

Canadian National Railway Co. lowered its forecast for earnings growth Tuesday as it faces the threat of a worker strike.

The Montreal-based railway, which earned $1.11 billion in the second quarter, said it is seeing international customers route shipments away from Canadian ports in the face of continued labour uncertainty at the company.

CN is awaiting a decision from the Canada Industrial Relations Board on whether some shipments would be considered essential services in the event of a strike by the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference, the union that represents CN’s engineers and conductors. Though no strike or lockout can take place until at least 72 hours after that decision is made — a decision the company expects on or about Aug. 9 — the situation is casting a cloud over CN’s business.

“The prolonged nature of this process, which prior to the CIRB referral was to conclude in May, is impacting our customers, and it is impacting our business — particularly in (the area of) international intermodal where customers have taken actions to reroute vessels away from Canadian ports until the labour question has been resolved,” said CEO Tracy Robinson on a conference call with analysts Tuesday.

Robinson said the company’s second quarter was “challenging.” She added CN’s volumes were tracking well ahead of plan until May, when contract talks between Canada’s largest railway and the union got bogged down.

“Starting late May we saw a sharp reduction primarily in our international volumes on concerns of a work stoppage,” Robinson said. “This is volume destined to the U.S. that has shifted to U.S. ports. So we have lighter volumes in the third quarter than expected.”

In June, the Teamsters rejected an offer from CN to enter into binding arbitration, a development that raised the risk of a strike. Then-labour minister Seamus O’Regan, who recently announced his resignation from cabinet, asked the CIRB to address the question of whether some shipments would continue as essential services in the event of a strike or lockout.

CN said Tuesday it does not expect the situation to escalate to a full-fledged strike or lockout, and its revised forecast makes the assumption that the current traffic diversions do not increase.

Still, the company said it is lowering its forecasted adjusted earnings per share growth for the year to the mid- to high-single-digit range, compared to an earlier forecast that predicted earnings-per-share growth of approximately 10 per cent.

Robinson said CN expects to have more certainty on the labour front after the CIRB issues its decision. She said the company’s position on a collective agreement with its engineers and conductors has not changed in recent months — it is still looking to create a structure around work scheduling that would improve crew availability in light of new federal rules around mandatory work and rest rules for critical railway employees.

The Teamsters have said CN is trying to squeeze more availability out of its train crews as a way to compensate for labour shortages. The union has said the railway’s proposal would see workers required to move across the country for months at a time to fill labour shortages in remote areas of Canada.

CN said Tuesday its net income for the quarter was five per cent lower than the $1.17 billion in the same three months of 2023.

On an adjusted basis, the company said it earned $1.17 billion in the second quarter of 2024, or $1.84 per share compared with $1.76 per share in the prior year’s quarter.

The railway reported revenues of $4.33 billion, a seven per cent increase year-over-year.

Its operating ratio, a key measure of railway efficiency where a smaller number is better, increased from 60.6 to 64 per cent year-over-year.

CN’s share price declined by $2.59, or 1.54 per cent, to close at $165.35 on Tuesday.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 23, 2024.

Companies in this story: (TSX:CNR)

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending