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Convicted or not, Canadian neo-Nazi Zeiger’s ideas will not pass

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Montreal, July 11, 2022 – As the trial of one of Canada’s most notorious neo-Nazis, Gabriel Sohier-Chaput, wraps up in Montreal today, Independent Jewish Voices Canada (IJV) stands with anti-fascist activists and all people who have been targetted by his hateful ideas and actions. Sohier-Chaput, also known as “Zeiger”, was a leading editor and administrator for the neo-Nazi blog “The Daily Stormer” before being exposed by anti-fascist activists in a series of explosive articles that caught the country’s attention in 2018. The Montreal-resident cowardly fled the city after having his identity exposed, and in 2020 was charged with one count of wilful promotion of hate propaganda. He pleaded not guilty. The trial began with three days of arguments in February, but did not reach a conclusion at that time. The Crown will give its final arguments on the fourth and final day of the trial today.

 

“Regardless of the outcome of this trial, we need to send a clear message that Sohier-Chaput’s fascist ideology has no place in our society,” says Aaron Lakoff, IJV’s Communications and Media Lead.

 

Even though Sohier-Chaput wrote between 800 and 1000 articles during his time as editor of the Daily Stormer, he is only being charged for a single article, which targets Jews.

 

“Antisemitism is a reprehensible, deadly force, and it is far from the only form of hatred that Sohier -Chaput has espoused,” continued Lakoff. “It is mind-boggling that Sohier-Chaput is only being charged for one article, while his writing has applauded violence against people of colour, Muslims, queer folks and women for years.”

 

Recent mass shootings in the USA such as the ones in Buffalo or Pittsburgh have shown us that antisemitism,white supremacy and Islamophobia often combine as a deadly cocktail. And the toxic ideas that Sohier-Chaput espoused have led to too much bloodshed.

 

“While antisemitic and white supremacist violence has broken the hearts and bodies of so many communities, we must come together to stop future attacks,” says Lakoff. “Jews, Muslims, Palestinians, Arabs, Black folks, queer and trans folks have been the targets of neo-Nazis like Zeiger, but we can also be powerful allies in stopping fascism once and for all”.

Prior instances of the charge of promoting hatred under the Criminal Code have shown it to be difficult legally. And ignoring all of the other toxic activity of this man may make it more so.

“If the court decides Zeiger is not guilty, that is far from a vindication,” says Lakoff. “IJV will continue to support anti-fascist organizing against antisemitism and racism”.

 

To recall, Sohier-Chaput participated in the infamous Charlottesville alt-right riots in 2018, which saw hundreds of fascists chanting racist and antisemitic slurs, and led to the death of anti-fascist activist Heather Heyer. Anti-fascist activists will be demonstrating outside the Palais de Justice today during the trial, beginning at 11am. A member of IJV-Montreal will be giving a speech at the rally.

 

Media contact: Aaron Lakoff, IJV Communications and Media Lead, 514-317-6288, aaron@ijvcanada.org

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Canadians favour metric measurements, but use imperial: poll – CTV News

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While many Canadians don’t support moving away from the metric system of measurement, many continue to use imperial measurements in their daily lives, a new online poll by Research Co. has found

Canada is a “metric” nation, having officially converted in 1970, but there is inconsistency in employing such measurements, the poll published Monday has found, with Canadians gravitating toward imperial measurements for height, weight and oven temperature.

It was found that 80 per cent of Canadians measured a person’s height in feet and inches, while only 20 per cent rely on metres and centimetres.

Seventy-six per cent of Canadians determined a person’s weight in pounds, while only 24 per cent did in kilograms. And finally, 59 per cent measured their oven temperature in Fahrenheit while 41 per cent preferred Celsius.

But for volume, speed and outdoor temperature, Canadians preferred the metric system, the poll found.

Eighty-four per cent of Canadians determined the volume of liquid in a container in litres, whereas 16 percent used quarts and gallons.

Eighty-two per cent of Canadians gauged a vehicle’s speed in kilometres per hour, whereas 28 per cent did in miles per hour. For measuring the outdoor temperature, 77 per cent of Canadians used Celsius, compared to 23 per cent who used Fahrenheit.

There were also discrepancies in who wants to adopt which system across the country, with the preferences greatly differing according to age.

“Practically two-in-five Canadians aged 55 and over (38 per cent) would go back to the imperial system of units,” said Mario Canseco, President of Research Co., in a release.

“This wish is less prevalent among their counterparts aged 35-to-54 (23 per cent) and aged 18-to-34 (24 per cent).”

Overall, the poll found that the metric system was preferred by more than half (56 per cent) of its respondents, compared to 23 per cent against it.

The online poll surveyed 1000 Canadian adults from Aug.1 to Aug. 3, and was “statistically weighted according to Canadian census figures for age, gender and region,” according to the release.

The only countries in the world that still use the imperial system on a daily basis are the United States, Myanmar, and Liberia.

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Where to look for cheap rent in Canada, as prices soar, again – CBC.ca

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As rent prices spiked over the past two months, affordable pockets of rental housing became harder and harder to find.

In July, the average monthly cost for rental properties across Canada was $1,934 — up 10.4 per cent over last year, according to the data of the property listing company Rentals.ca. A similar hike in June saw the average rent spike 9.5 per cent.

Analysts say the steep prices are being driven by more demand than inventory.

And that demand is being driven in part by some people fleeing larger cities, while others flock to them.

This creates a challenge for people like Joan Alexander.

The senior has rented homes across Canada, in St. Catharines, Ont., and Guelph, Ont., then in Castlegar, B.C., and for the past two years on Prince Edward Island.

Joan Alexander, left, sits with her dog Beau and her partner Elizabeth Huether. They plan to move from P.E.I. to Lloydminster this October. (Submitted by Joan Alexander )

Alexander and her partner chose Summerside, a city about 50 kilometres northwest of Charlottetown, for its small-town feel.

But rising rental costs and other considerations — like proximity to health care — are driving her to relocate.

“We really hoped that P.E.I. would be our last stop on our life journey,” she said. 

Last year, rents on P.E.I. rose higher than they had in a decade. Plus rental places are scarce.

Finding affordable rental housing in Canada after a pandemic is proving a challenge for many, with spiking interest rates, inflation and limited rental stock. 

Ben Myers, president of Bullpen Research and Consulting, a real estate advisory firm that tracks rental pricing in Canada, says if you are looking for a deal there still are some places he’d describe as comparatively “cheap.”

He suggests looking at Red Deer or Lethbridge in Alberta, or Saskatoon.

“You can get a two-bedroom for under $1,150 a month. It’s all about where you can work,” said Myers. 

Alexander says she was able to find a few havens on the Prairies.

“It felt almost too good to be true. There seemed to be a few pockets where we could find what we were looking for. Pet friendly, affordable, safe housing,” said Alexander, who needs monitoring after donating a kidney and a place that welcomes her small, beloved dog — Beau.

Lloydminster — a city that spans Alberta and Saskatchewan — attracted Alexander and her spouse with affordable prices and a pet-friendly property owner.

They move in October to their new $1,200-per-month home.

WATCH | Priced out by rising rents:

Soaring prices leaving some renters priced out

10 hours ago

Duration 2:03

While the housing market may be cooling down, the rental market is on fire, with the price of an average unit up 10 per cent compared to last year. That has left many renters scrambling to find suitable housing.

Rentals.ca listings include detached and semi-detached homes, townhouses, condominium apartments, rental apartments and basement apartments. The company can’t provide an average rent for all cities. Some smaller communities don’t have enough rentals to get an accurate average.

So it’s worth hunting. There are some hidden gems.

Myers says that in a normal year, rent can fluctuate on average three to five per cent. But average rents grew 10 to 12 per cent in 2019, due to a shortage of supply, he says. Then the pandemic hit and rent declined, on average, 15 to 20 per cent.

“We are now adjusting back to pre-pandemic levels,” said Myers.

Renters on the move

Then there are the super-expensive anomalies — like Vancouver, which rebounded even faster from the pandemic, with a per month average rent of $2,300 in June 2022. 

Myers says there have also been significant shifts to cities that used to enjoy low rent, as some people migrate to smaller places where they can get more real estate for their dollar.

Retiring Baby Boomers from the Toronto area are creating demand and raising prices in places like the Niagara Region and Halifax, for example. 

“Halifax has gone kind of nuclear. Definitely a lot of Ontarians moved to Halifax during the pandemic,” Myers said.

Also, he says a lot of students stayed in their university towns like Victoria, London, Ont., and Kingston, Ont., when offices closed during the past two years.

“All the benefits of living in a big city were almost bad because you didn’t want to be around a lot of people during a pandemic,” said Myers. 

Vanishing affordable rentals

But all this change has just put more pressure on the rental market that’s been seeing declines in rental options for low earners for more than a decade, according to housing policy researcher Steve Pomeroy.

He uses Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) data to probe losses in the rental market.

Rents can fluctuate on average three to five per cent, says one expert. But when the pandemic hit they dropped, on average, 15 to 20 per cent. (CBC)

Pomeroy, the senior research fellow for the Centre of Urban Research at Carleton University, estimates that between 2011 and 2016, the number of rental units that would be affordable for households earning less than $30,000 per year — with rents below $750 — declined by 322,600 in Canada.

That has an effect on the one in three Canadians who rent, according to 2016 census data.

Pomeroy says historically Quebec offered the largest rental stock available in the country.

“Quebec has always been culturally very different. Rent is much more culturally accepted. It’s a bit about European influence … You get these very scenic estates of two-, three-storey homes with the wrought iron staircase and with three units, and two are rented. So by definition, two-thirds of your population are renters,” he said.

He says perhaps it’s time for the remainder of Canada to consider a more European model, where renting is more accepted. 

He says there are many cities, in France and Germany for example, where renters almost match owners in population.

North America historically has had a different culture, where owning is seen as better.

“Traditionally there has been very strong support for home ownership. Here in Canada we’ve had mortgage insurance including increasing access to credit for buyers … the political system has very much reinforced that belief system, that ownership is the right thing to do.”

But now, tenancy and anti-poverty organizations are lobbying for more renters’ rights. That’s something Pomeroy sees as a positive shift.

He also says he believes many younger Canadians see renting as their future. It gives them the freedom to pursue experiences, move for jobs and not remain tethered to a property that they can’t afford.

Pomeroy recently asked his graduate students — all employed and in their 20s — if they thought they could buy a home in the next five years. Would you want to?

He says he was surprised to hear for the first time, none of them believed they could.

“Nobody thought they could, and only about half actually wanted to.”

Historically, Quebec has had the most rental stock available in the country, like this Montreal building, seen in May, featuring a wrought-iron staircase and a shared garden area. (Ivanoh Demers/Radio-Canada)

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A year after the fall of Kabul, Canadian veterans urge Ottawa not to abandon Afghans trying to flee – CBC News

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It’s been one year since Kabul fell to the Taliban after American and allied troops — including Canadians — left the country.

Video footage showed Afghans streaming onto the tarmac at the Kabul airport, desperate to escape, as a U.S. air force plane took off. Some fell to their death trying to hold on.

“We watched that terrible situation unfold … we saw that tremendous catastrophe that happened in Kabul,” said Brian Macdonald.

A Canadian veteran who served in Afghanistan, Macdonald leads the non-profit Aman Lara, which is Pashto for “Sheltered Path.” The collective of Canadian veterans and former interpreters has been working over the last year to bring refugees to safety in Canada.

“When we were unable to get them out a year ago, it was devastating. But since then we’ve come together, we’ve doubled down and been able to get 3,000 people out,” he said.

But it’s been a slow and dangerous process when those refugees need to go through the Taliban to get a passport.

“These people that have helped Canada now have to stand up and go to an office that’s controlled by the Taliban and give their name and address and the dates of birth of their children,” Macdonald said.

“It’s a very dangerous thing to do.”

Brian Macdonald, the executive director of Aman Lara, says the non-profit has successfully helped more than 3,000 Afghan refugees to safety in Canada since Kabul fell to the Taliban one year ago. (Derek Hooper/CBC)

There was hope this June, when Pakistan agreed to temporarily allow Afghan refugees approved to come to Canada across its border, without a passport or visa.

But Macdonald says they’ve hit roadblocks bringing those refugees to Canada.

“We were hoping it would be thousands, and it ended up being dozens,” he said.

“We’re dealing with the Afghan-Pakistani border, and it’s a very wild place. And so messages aren’t always clearly communicated, but we believe the window may still be open.”

Ottawa promises to speed up application process

A spokesperson for Immigration Minister Sean Fraser said Canada has added more employees on the ground to process applications as quickly as possible, including in Pakistan.

The department did not say how many undocumented Afghans have successfully made it to Canada through the arrangement with Pakistan.

In this photo provided by the U.S. Marine Corps, Italian coalition forces assist and escort evacuees for onward processing during an evacuation at the Kabul, Afghanistan airport on Aug. 24. (Staff Sgt. Victor Mancilla/U.S. Marine Corps/The Associated Press)

Canada initially said it would bring 40,000 Afghan refugees to Canada — focusing on Afghans who were employed by the Canadian government and military. The federal government says that, to date, it has welcomed 17,300, with more still to arrive “in the coming weeks and months.”

“We remain steadfast in our collective resolve to bring vulnerable Afghans to safety in Canada as quickly as possible,” says a joint statement released Monday by Fraser, Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly and International Development Minister Harjit Sajjan.

The statement does not indicate when Ottawa expects to reach its target of resettling 40,000 Afghans.

In the statement, the ministers lamented what they called the “steady deterioration” of human and democratic rights in Afghanistan since the Taliban seized power last year, citing the reintroduction of severe restrictions on the ability of women and girls to go to school and to move freely within the country.

‘We can hold our heads high,’ says deputy PM about evacuation

But the federal government has been criticized for not doing more to help Afghans who assisted Canada in the NATO-led effort and are now at risk of being killed by the Taliban for their ties to Western nations.

Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland said “we need to not think in the past tense” when asked if Canada could have done more a year ago.

“We can hold our heads up high when we think about our response compared to that of our allies. There is a lot more work to do,” Freeland said in Toronto on Thursday.

“We need to keep on working to bring more people from Afghanistan to Canada, and that’s exactly what we’re doing.”

Deputy prime minister answers questions about Afghanistan

4 days ago

Duration 2:23

Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland says Canada’s priority is to focus on the women and children of Afghanistan ‘who have suffered real setbacks.’

Last month, Canada stopped accepting new applications to its special immigration program, a move that advocates say amounts to the abandoning of Afghans desperate to come to this country.

Macdonald hopes the federal government reconsiders its approach and commits to welcoming every Afghan who helped the government into Canada.

“A year ago, we were panicking to get as many people out as possible,” Macdonald said.

“We all thought — as veterans and other interpreters — that that window had closed, that the people we didn’t get out were stuck in Afghanistan.

“But what we’ve learned over the last year is we can still move them out. It’s at a snail’s pace. It’s not as many people as we’d like. But we are still grinding away every day, moving people out of Afghanistan.  And we’re just going to keep doing that until we get as many people out as we possibly can.”

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