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Dell announces new Latitude 9000, 7000 and 5000 laptops – comments – GSMArena.com

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  • Anonymous
  • j%t
  • 22 minutes ago

Dell is a garbage brand. Same with Acer and Gateway.
Nothing but problems after 6 months of use.

A

  • Anonymous
  • XSs
  • 4 hours ago

Laptop news and reviews at this site a joke

3155989

I’ll wait for the Latitude 7220 2-in-1 tablet. The Latitude 7200 series is, to me, the most complete Windows tablet on sale today.

T25363

Instead of that automatic crap that will cause problems , a plain old mechanical solution is much better tbh … or just don’t do crap infront of your laptop 😀

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  • Anonymous
  • UG4
  • 6 hours ago

Dell need to make their own CPU. Huawei is on it. Microsoft is thinking about it. Arm Windows 10 is now running fine on Mac M1. 64bit / 32bit x86 emulation for the legacy Windows 10 is working.

The industry is posed to turn soon. Then all these Intel machine will need to retire to be nothing more then bread toasters and hair dryers.

G

  • GSMarenaFan
  • Hkr
  • 6 hours ago

Great idea of an Automatic shutter! Other peers were only able to include a manual shutter. Hats off to all the techies at Dell there…

A153

Build quality, solidity, and ergonomics of Latitude line has gone for a toss. Latitude line has become too watered down and their design philosophy has been diluted to death by Dell

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  • Anonymous
  • s%N
  • 8 hours ago

With the quality improvements and much lower costs these days why are they still offering FHD cameras as an upgrade? I’m certain most kids cameras have better sensors than a lot of laptops.

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  • Anonymous
  • vGj
  • 9 hours ago

To hell with Intel with their dead and decaying X86 dinosaur technology.

MacBook Pro M1 is a better buy

t14440

If this “safe shutter” is not a physical cover over the lens, then why bother ?
If done with software, then how do you tell its realy working ?
I’ll carry on sticking a bit of gaffer tape over the lens.

S

  • SAI PRAVEEN
  • DkN
  • 9 hours ago

It is very good laptop

O21833

The “SafeShutter camera” feature was available in the Nokia N8.

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  • Anonymous
  • y6V
  • 10 hours ago

This is honestly better than buying a $1500 Huawei Mate 40 Pro+. At least laptops can last longer than phones, most people often replace their phones anyway. At least with laptops you can actually do a lot of edit

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The View40 is Honor's first phone after splitting from Huawei – Yahoo Canada Shine On

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Eat This, Not That!

Sure Signs You’ve Already Had COVID, According to Scientists

More than 10% of those who get COVID will feel sicker, longer—they are victims of Long COVID, or Post-COVID Syndrome. The symptoms can be as painful as they are unnerving: tinnitus, migraines, myalgia, hair loss—the horrors never cease. Now, a new study has determined the most common characteristics. “This is the first study on COVID investigating 3,762 patients beyond 6 months of illness, tracking the prevalence of 205 symptoms in 10 organ systems,” say the researchers. “We focused on mapping the longer-term impact of COVID-19 on health, work, and returning to baseline.” Read on to see if you have the most frequent symptoms reported after month 6—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus. 1 You Will Most Likely Suffer Fatigue Up to 80.3% Experienced This In nearly every study of Long COVID, fatigue is the most common symptom. This fatigue doesn’t just make you feel “sleepy”; it’s a soul-sucking, full-body drain that can leave many incapacitated, or at the very least feeling “no longer themselves.” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has likened Long COVID to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis, for which there is no cure. The hallmark symptom for CFS/ME is a fatigue that doesn’t improve after six months—and worsens with exertion. Which leads us to our next slide…. 2 You Will Likely Have Post-Exertional Malaise Up to 75.0% Experienced ThisPost-exertional malaise—aka “PEM”—”has been described as a cluster of symptoms following mental or physical exertion, often involving a loss of physical or mental stamina, rapid muscle or cognitive fatigability, and sometimes lasting 24 hours or more,” reports one study. The worsening symptoms can include “fatigue, headaches, muscle aches, cognitive deficits, insomnia, and swollen lymph nodes. It can occur after even the simplest everyday tasks, such as walking, showering, or having a conversation.”RELATED: 7 Tips You Must Follow to Avoid COVID, Say Doctors 3 You Will Likely Have Cognitive Dysfunction Up to 58.8% Experienced This Long Haulers have reported “brain fog”—which Dr. Fauci describes as a difficulty to concentrate—as well as hallucinations, confusion and clumsiness. “Many other long haulers describe their most debilitating persistent symptom as impaired memory and concentration, often with extreme fatigue,” reports JAMA Network. “The effects are different from the cognitive impairment patients might experience after a critical illness.” “I do think there’s a subset of patients [who] weren’t even in the hospital who have a postviral brain fog,” said COVID-19 Recovery Clinic (CORE) of Montefiore Medical Center in New York, codirector Aluko Hope, MD, MSCE. 4 How Long Do These Symptoms Last? How Will They Impact Your Life? “These three symptoms were also the three most commonly reported overall,” say the study’s authors. How long will they last? Long COVID may last forever; after all, there is no cure for CFS/ME. Other people recover within a year. Doctors just don’t know yet. To get granular, according to the study: “In those who recovered in less than 90 days, the average number of symptoms peaked at week 2, and in those who did not recover in 90 days, the average number of symptoms peaked at month 2. Respondents with symptoms over 6 months experienced an average of 13.8 symptoms in month 7,” they continued. “85.9% experienced relapses, with exercise, physical or mental activity, and stress as the main triggers. 86.7% of unrecovered respondents were experiencing fatigue at the time of survey, compared to 44.7% of recovered respondents. 45.2% reported requiring a reduced work schedule compared to pre-illness and 22.3% were not working at the time of survey due to their health conditions.” 5 What to Do If You Have Long COVID Symptoms “Patients with Long COVID report prolonged multisystem involvement and significant disability,” report the study’s authors. “Most had not returned to previous levels of work by 6 months. Many patients are not recovered by 7 months, and continue to experience significant symptom burden.” If you experience any of these symptoms, contact a medical professional immediately. And to protect your life and the lives of others, don’t visit any of these 35 Places You’re Most Likely to Catch COVID.

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Why we're so excited for Resident Evil: Village and its very tall lady – it's the Eurogamer next-gen news cast! – Eurogamer.net

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Oh, mother.

It’s Friday, and that means it’s time for another Eurogamer next-gen news cast! In the video below, Eurogamer news editor Tom Phillips, reporter Emma Kent and me discuss the week’s news, including the gameplay reveal of the promising Resident Evil: Village. Is its very tall lady a vampire? This is actually something we have thoughts about.

We’re excited for Village, but we’re not so pumped for multiplayer spin-off Re:Verse. Capcom’s multiplayer Resident Evil offerings have been mixed at best, and we’re not sure why Re:Verse, with its off-putting art style, even exists.

Eurogamer Next-Gen News Cast – Why we’re so excited for Resident Evil: Village and its very tall lady.

Elsewhere in next-gen news, PlayStation 5 scalpers are at it again – although GAME has played down the claims from some on social media who posted screenshots of scores of secured orders alongside a boast about making loads of money from them.

We then have a chinwag about Sony’s decision to pull the PS5 game release windows it published in the small print of its own CES 2021 video, and what we think that means for those release dates (spoilers: everything will probably be delayed anyway).

Then we’re onto an upcoming Microsoft exclusive: the mysterious Project: Mara. This week, developer Ninja Theory offered a fresh glimpse at its “mental terror” experience, and its photo-realistic apartment. This is certainly one to watch.

And finally, Skyrim! Now, I know Bethesda’s near decade-old role-playing game isn’t exactly next-gen, but this week it emerged you can get Skyrim running at 60fps on a PS5 with the help of a new mod, and all of a sudden I feel the need to jump back into its open world – again. You know, if Bethesda put out a next-gen console update for Skyrim, I’m pretty sure it would do well!

Oh, and keep your eye out this week for a mug check. Perhaps we’ll make it a regular thing.

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Apple's first headset to be niche precursor to eventual AR glasses – BNN

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Apple Inc.’s first crack at a headset is designed to be a pricey, niche precursor to a more ambitious augmented reality product that will take longer to develop, according to people with knowledge of the matter. 

The initial device has confronted several development hurdles and the company has conservative sales expectations, illustrating how challenging it will be to bring this nascent consumer technology to the masses. 

As a mostly virtual reality device, it will display an all-encompassing 3-D digital environment for gaming, watching video and communicating. AR functionality, the ability to overlay images and information over a view of the real world, will be more limited. Apple has planned to launch the product as soon as 2022, going up against Facebook Inc.’s Oculus, Sony Corp.’s PlayStation VR and headsets from HTC Corp., the people said. They asked not to be identified discussing private plans. 

Apple’s typical playbook involves taking emerging consumer technology, such as music players, smartphones, tablets and smartwatches, and making it reliable and easy to use for everyone. This time, though, Apple isn’t looking to create an iPhone-like hit for its first headset. Instead, the company is building a high-end, niche product that will prepare outside developers and consumers for its eventual, more mainstream AR glasses. 

The plans suggest that Apple’s first headset will be far more expensive than those from rivals, which cost about US$300 to US$900. Some Apple insiders believe the company may sell only one headset per day per retail store. Apple has roughly 500 stores, so in that scenario, annual sales would be just over 180,000 units — excluding other sales channels. That would put it on par with other pricey Apple products, such as the US$5,999 Mac Pro desktop computer. An Apple spokesman declined to comment.

Apple is aiming to include some of its most advanced and powerful chips in the headset along with displays that are much higher-resolution than those in existing VR products. Some of the chips tested in the device beat the performance of Apple’s M1 Mac processors. The company has also designed the headset with a fan, something the company usually tries to avoid on mobile products, the people said.

The headset, codenamed N301, is in a late prototype stage, but is not yet finalized so the company’s plans could change or be scrapped entirely before launch. The AR glasses, codenamed N421, are in an early stage known as “architecture,” meaning Apple is still working on underlying technologies. This product is several years away, according to the people, though Apple has previously targeted as early as 2023 to unveil it. 

The powerful processors and the inclusion of a fan initially led to a device that was too large and heavy with some concern about neck strain in early testing. Apple removed the space VR gadgets usually reserve for users who need to wear eyeglasses, which brought the headset closer to the face and helped shrink the size. And to address consumers with poorer eyesight, it developed a system where custom prescription lenses can be inserted into the headset over the VR screens, the people said.  

This may expose Apple to regulations governing the sale of products with prescriptions. The company typically sells its devices in dozens of countries, many of which have different prescription rules. Apple is also discussing how it would implement prescriptions at the point of sale online and in retail stores. 

Apple originally planned to include less powerful processors and offload much of the work to a hub in a user’s home that would wirelessly beam content to the headset. But that idea was squashed by Jony Ive, Apple’s design chief at the time, Bloomberg News reported last year. The headset is designed to work as a standalone device, meaning it can operate on a battery rather than be plugged into a wall or a Mac. That’s similar to Facebook’s latest VR product, while Sony’s requires a PlayStation gaming console. 

To further reduce the device’s weight, Apple is planning to use a fabric exterior. That’s a departure from the metal designs Apple uses for most products, though it has used plastic for devices like AirPods, that need to be light, and fabrics for the HomePod speaker to improve acoustics. 

Prototypes of the headset, some of which are about the size of an Oculus Quest, include external cameras to enable some AR features. The company is testing using the cameras for hand-tracking and is working on a feature where a user can type virtually in the air to input text. It’s unclear if that function will be ready for the first version of the device or if it will ever leave the exploratory stage. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted some development with Apple hardware engineers only being able to work on certain days from the office. The company has also faced delays conducting user testing and data collection. That has slowed some decisions in the engineering process. 

The company is also still grappling with what content and functionality it intends to ship with the device. Virtual reality is still a somewhat nascent technology, with content beyond games still relatively limited. Last year, Apple acquired a company called NextVR, which recorded events such as concerts and sports games in virtual reality. It’s also discussed bundling an App Store with the device, which runs on an operating system dubbed “rOS” inside the company. 

If Apple goes ahead with the VR headset, it would be a precursor to an eventual pair of AR glasses — a product that the company sees as far more mainstream but also more difficult to launch. Microsoft Corp.’s HoloLens 2 and Magic Leap’s headset, which emphasize AR over VR, retail for US$3,500 and US$2,295 respectively. HoloLens mostly focuses on work use cases still, while Magic Leap fell well short of the early hype and slashed jobs last year. 

Apple first added AR to the iPhone in 2017, allowing new mobile games and apps like those for virtually placing furniture in your living room before buying it. Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook has said both virtual and augmented reality have potential, but that AR is the larger opportunity. 

AR glasses must be packed with small, powerful and efficient electronics to overlay notifications, map directions and other information while supporting internet connectivity and strong battery life. That’s a huge technical challenge. Even Oculus, which released its first all-in-one VR headset in 2019, won’t include AR features in its first glasses this year.

Getting to that point requires years of work on lenses, hardware and software, component miniaturization, production techniques and content creation. Critically, getting most people to wear a computer on their face, even a small one, is difficult. That, in part, doomed Google’s early attempt at consumer AR glasses several years ago.

By developing a less mainstream initial headset, Apple can invest in the underlying technologies, consumer education, content development and developer relations to give its eventual AR glasses the best opportunity to be successful — when they are ready.

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