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Denis Shapovalov on French Open: Scheduling is absolutely awful – TSN

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PARIS — From what Denis Shapovalov called the French Open’s “trash scheduling” and its “freezing” weather, to a call on a shot by his opponent that looked “one inch out” to the “annoying” state of the clay and tennis balls, it seems safe to say the No. 9 seed was not in the best of moods after a five-hour loss in the second round.

What the 21-year-old Canadian did not mention were his 106 unforced errors or that he got broken twice while serving for the victory in the fifth set along the way to getting beaten 7-5, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 3-6, 8-6 by 101st-ranked Roberto Carballes Baena.

Understandably, Carballes Baena’s spirits were a tad higher.

“For me, it’s amazing,” he said. “It’s the first (time) I beat a top 10 (player). The first time I’m in the third round in a Grand Slam. First time I win a match in the 5th set. So I couldn’t be more happy.”

Not much rest for the weary: Shapovalov was due to play a doubles match later Thursday, and that might have displeased him the most.

“Scheduling is absolutely awful. I mean, after a five-hour match I have to play doubles now. It’s just like, it’s just complete trash scheduling. It’s disappointing,” he said. “I mean you’re in a Grand Slam — and I don’t want to sound spoiled, you know, but you expect at least some help from the tournament to help you compete. I mean, how am I supposed to come out and play doubles now after a five-hour match?”

After Jelena Ostapenko eliminated No. 2 seed Karolina Pliskova at the French Open on Thursday, the conversation quickly turned to 2017.

Which made sense, of course, because that was when Ostapenko surprisingly won the championship at Roland Garros — and the last year she even won so much as one match at the clay-court tournament, let alone two, the way she has this week.

“Of course it’s in my memory, because it’s the biggest win of my career so far, but I have to move forward. And just, like, the world doesn’t stop with winning only one Grand Slam. Of course I want to achieve more and I want to be back in top 5, top 10,” Ostapenko said after beating Pliskova 6-4, 6-2 with the help of a 27-9 edge in total winners.

“Step by step. That’s what I’m working on: my consistency,” Ostapenko said. “Still being an aggressive player — I think it can bring me a lot of wins — but consistency, probably, in my game is the key.”

Her next opponent is 87th-ranked Paula Badosa, who showed up this week with a 1-5 career record in Grand Slam matches but is into the third round at a major for the first time thanks to a 6-4, 4-6, 6-2 victory over 2017 U.S. Open champion and 2018 French Open runner-up Sloane Stephens.

Ostapenko has been as high as No. 5 and is currently No. 43. That’s not very different from where she was three years ago in Paris, ranked 47th and just two days past her 20th birthday when she became an impossible-to-predict Grand Slam champion.

“I was fearless,” she recalled Thursday. “Nobody really knew me.”

Using a grip-it-and-rip-it style, Ostapenko upset Simona Halep in the final, making the Latvian the first woman since 1979 to earn her first tour-level title at a major tournament.

Nowadays, there is more subtlety to Ostapenko’s style.

Against Pliskova, she built points. She used drop shots effectively. And she handled Pliskova’s serve, one of the best on tour: Ostapenko won 54% of her return points and broke five times.

Pliskova, who came into the French Open dealing with a leg injury, was not the most gracious foe after Thursday’s loss.

“I know that she can be tough if she’s playing well,” Pliskova said, “but I think everything started with me. Definitely, I was not playing great.”

DON’T CRY FOR ME

Australian Open champion Sofia Kenin takes the highs and lows of being a professional athlete to heart.

When she isn’t on the court, anyway.

“Before the match, I get quite emotional. Sometimes crying,” said the No. 4-seeded Kenin, who reached the third round in Paris with a 3-6, 6-3, 6-2 victory against 93rd-ranked Ana Bogdan of Romania. “Luckily, here, there are no tears, thank God.”

But while she gets nervous while waiting to play, once she is in the thick of things, trying to win, it’s a different story.

“During the match, I just try to put the emotions aside. I don’t have time to think about my emotions. I have to play one point at a time,” Kenin said. “After, if I win, I’m happy. … If I lose, I’m crying. So far, so good.”

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AP Tennis Writer Howard Fendrich reported from Washington; AP Sports Writer Jerome Pugmire reported from Paris.

___

More AP tennis: https://apnews.com/apf-Tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

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Edmonton sports legend Joey Moss dies at 57 – Global News

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Edmonton sports legend Joey Moss has died at the age of 57, Global News has learned.

Moss has been a beloved member of the Edmonton Oilers for decades. He became the NHL team’s locker room attendant in 1984, after he was recommended by The Great One himself — Wayne Gretzky. The two met when Gretzky was just 20 years old. He was dating Moss’ sister at the time.

In a statement, the Moss family said Joey passed away peacefully Monday with his family by his side.

Read more:
People Magazine highlights friendship between Wayne Gretzky and Joey Moss

The Oilers sent out a message on Twitter Monday night, saying the entire organization was mourning the loss of “dear friend and colleague, the legendary Joey Moss.”

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Moss, who was born with Down syndrome, joined the Edmonton Football Team two years later.

The Winnifred Stewart Association, which Moss and his family were involved with for many years, shared a statement from his family.

“It is with deep sadness that the family announces the passing of Joey Moss. Joey passed away peacefully on Oct. 26 at the age of 57 with his family by his side.

“Joey was a remarkable person who taught us to love, laugh and enjoy life always.

“While Joey is most recognized as the dressing room attendant for the Edmonton Oilers and the Edmonton Football Team, and singing the national anthem; Joey is also remembered for his incredible dance moves and putting a smile on your face when you are feeling down.

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“Joey’s 35 years tenure with the Edmonton Oilers and the Edmonton Football Team shows his dedication and loyalty to the jobs that he loved. His strong work ethic and contributions were rewarded, as he was presented with an NHL All-Star Award, Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Award, and was inducted into the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame, just to name a few.

“We would like to thank the city of Edmonton and everyone who supported and embraced Joey.

“We hope that Joey’s legacy will continue on through the Edmonton Oilers, Edmonton Football Team and all professional sports clubs and workplaces, as we continue to recognize the contributions that people with developmental disabilities make in our society, as integral members of the workforce.”

The Winnifred Stewart Association and Foundation said Moss touched the hearts of a lot of people.

“Joey was an inspiration to many and was an ambassador for people with developmental disabilities. This loss will be felt far and wide, and we are so grateful for the time we had with him.

“Our deepest sympathy goes out to Joey’s family, his friends and all of Edmonton during this difficult time.”






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Edmonton sports legend Joey Moss dies at 57


Edmonton sports legend Joey Moss dies at 57

In a post on its website, the Edmonton Football Team organization paid tribute to Moss and said it was deeply saddened to learn of his passing.

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“We extend our heartfelt condolences to the Moss family,” the football club said.

“Edmonton lost a hero today. Joey’s bravery, humor, strength, work ethic and perseverance in our dressing room and in our community left indelible impressions that will live with us all.

“More than that, Joey endeared himself to everyone in our province, our country and beyond, no matter who they were. He was a symbol of what true teamwork is comprised of and we are all better for having known him. He touched us all.”

Over the years, he’s captured the hearts of those in Edmonton and beyond, particularly for his enthusiastic participation in the national anthem before the start of every game.

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Joey Moss of the Edmonton Oilers sings the national anthem prior to Game Five of the Western Conference First Round during the 2017 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs against the San Jose Sharks on April 20, 2017 at Rogers Place in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.


Joey Moss of the Edmonton Oilers sings the national anthem prior to Game Five of the Western Conference First Round during the 2017 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs against the San Jose Sharks on April 20, 2017 at Rogers Place in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.


Andy Devlin/NHLI via Getty Images

Moss racked up many accolades in Edmonton over the years.

In 2003, he was presented the NHL Alumni Association’s “Seventh Man Award,” which goes to NHL members “whose behind-the-scene efforts make a difference in the lives of others.”

In 2007, he accepted the Mayor’s Award from then-mayor Stephen Mandel in recognition of the Oilers commitment to persons with disabilities.

In, 2015, he was inducted to the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame to honour his contributions and dedication made to both the Oilers and Edmonton’s CFL club. In 2012, he was recognized with a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal.

Read more:
Joey Moss inducted into Alberta Sports Hall of Fame

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Moss is also the namesake behind “Joey’s Home”, an assisted-living home for people with developmental disabilities overseen by the Winnifred Stewart Association.

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Lions Saddened By Passing Of Owner And CFL Giant, David Braley – BC Lions

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The BC Lions Football Club is very saddened to announce that our owner and champion David Braley passed away peacefully this morning at his home in Burlington, Ontario.

“We share this news with the heaviest of hearts. David has been a proud and fiercely loyal owner of our team, a champion of the Canadian Football League, and a leader for whom his love of our game and our country went hand in hand and spanned decades.  We share our deepest condolences with his family, friends and admirers,” said Rick LeLacheur, President of the BC Lions Football Club.

“One of his final acts of devotion to Canadian football was a clear expression of his desire that the stability of our club be maintained through a smooth transition following his passing. We will work closely with David’s estate to follow that plan.”

Also owner of the Hamilton Tiger-Cats from 1989 to 1990 and the Toronto Argonauts from 2010 to 2015, Braley served as an Interim Commissioner of the CFL and Chair of its Board of Governors.  He was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 2012.

Braley was a highly successful entrepreneur with a genius for business and a generous philanthropist who made enormous contributions in the arenas of, i health, research and sport, including amateur football. Passionate about politics and public service, he served his country as a Senator from 2010 to 2013. Last year, he was named an officer of the Order of Canada, one of Canada’s highest honours.

“We have lost our greatest champion. All of us associated with the Lions have personally seen, time and time again, David’s selfless commitment to our club and our fans,” LeLacheur.

“But his example and inspiration, along with the direction he provided us all as his health failed, fuels our confidence in the Lions future. The BC Lions will continue to work hard to honour his memory by being the best we can be on the field, in the boardroom and in the community.”

A BC LIONS & CFL GIANT

Mr. Braley first purchased the financially-strapped BC Lions prior to the 1997 season and would be at the helm for one of the Canadian Football League’s most remarkable turnaround stories, both on and off the field.

During his induction speech at the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 2012, Mr. Braley spoke of how proud he was going from 8,000 fans in the stands at his first game as owner to averaging 35,000 at the highest point of his tenure.

His first Grey Cup win as a CFL owner was a historic one. In 2000, the Lions flipped the switch in November and became the first team in pro football to win a championship despite finishing below .500 in the regular season. The Cinderella run was completed with a 28-26 win over Montreal in the 94th Grey Cup at Calgary’s McMahon Stadium.

Three years later, the golden age of Mr. Braley’s Lions ownership began when he and the late Bobby Ackles successfully lured Wally Buono, the CFL’s most successful head coach, to the Lions from Calgary.

The Lions finished first in the Western Division every year from 2004-2007, posting a regular season record of 52-19-1 in the process. In 2006, the franchise won its’ fifth Grey Cup and second under Mr. Braley’s ownership by taking down the Alouettes yet again, 25-14 in Winnipeg.

He would earn a third in 2011 when the Lions went from an 0-5 start to Grey Cup champions, beating the Winnipeg Blue Bombers in front of our home fans at the newly renovated BC Place. The 2011 Grey Cup festival was also one of the more successful CFL events to date.

Along with the three Grey Cup championships and bringing fans back to the stadium, Mr. Braley’s ownership reign was also known for the Lions becoming major pillars in communities across the entire province. Prior to 2020, the club would visit an average of 140 schools per year.

A former high school player himself, Mr. Braley always believed in promoting the game of football at the grassroots level.

It was then-Hamilton mayor Bob Morrow who urged Mr. Braley to step in and purchase the struggling Hamilton Tiger-Cats in 1989. That was the start of his very successful track record of owning football franchises. The Tiger-Cats would appear in the Grey Cup in his first season as owner and would then return to community ownership prior to the 1992 season.

Mr. Braley also owned the Toronto Argonauts from 2010-2015. The highlight of that tenure was the Argonauts hosting and winning the historic 100th Grey Cup. It was the fourth and final Grey Cup win as a CFL owner.

A well-known leader and innovator, Mr. Braley also spent time as Chairman of the CFL’s Board of Governors and also served as Interim Commissioner from March-November of 2002 before the appointment of Tom Wright.

Mr. Braley’s success in the world of sports wasn’t just limited to the Canadian Football League. He kept soccer alive in the market by purchasing the Vancouver 86ers (A-League) in 1997 and owning them until the year 2000.

He was also a major force in bringing the 2012 World Cycling Championships to Hamilton in 2012 and was involved in Southern Ontario’s successful bid for the 2015 Pan Am Games.

After studying Sciences at McMaster University, Mr. Braley’s success in the business world began with General Motors Acceptance Corporation in Hamilton before he moved on to London Life Insurance.

He then purchased William Orlick Industries (now known as Orlick Industries) in 1969, and over the next several years transformed it from a small business into one of the leading manufactures of aluminum die-cast auto parts. Orlick Industries has also provided jobs for hundreds of workers in the Hamilton area.

Mr. Braley was always known for also being a champion in the world of Philanthropy, donating over $125 million to various organizations over the years.

During a remarkable ten-month stretch from August 2006 to June 2007, he gave $50 million to McMaster’s medical school and an additional $5 million for the University’s new athletic complex, which is appropriately named the David Braley Athletic Centre.

He also gave $10 million to Hamilton Health Sciences for a new cardiac, vascular and research institute as well as $5 million to St. Joseph’s Healthcare for operating rooms and kidney care.

In 2007, he was presented with an award from the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association for charitable and philanthropic contributions.

Mr. Braley’s long and storied career also included politics. He was appointed to the Canadian Senate by Prime Minister Stephen Harper in May of 2010, and would go on to serve for nearly three years before retiring from government. He received this country’s highest honour, the Order of Canada in 2019

Born in Montreal in 1941, his family moved to Hamilton in 1943. He quickly discovered his true passion for the game of football as a young child when he attended his first Tiger-Cats game at old Ivor Wynne Stadium. Love of the game is what led him to strap on the pads at Westdale High School and of course, carve out nearly three decades of success as an Owner and Governor in the Canadian Football League.

Mr. Braley is an honoured member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame (2012), McMaster Sports Hall of Fame (2007) and Hamilton Sports Hall of Fame (2006).

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Beckham out for season with torn ACL – theScore

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Cleveland Browns wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. will miss the remainder of the season with a torn ACL, the team announced Monday.

Beckham went down Sunday in the first quarter while attempting to tackle Cincinnati Bengals defensive back Darius Phillips, who was returning a Baker Mayfield interception. The Browns feared Beckham had suffered a significant injury on the play.

“The ball to Odell, we knew we were going to have a one-on-one and wanted to give him a chance,” Mayfield lamented after the game, which the Browns won. “I didn’t do that and left it short and inside. I am probably going to beat myself up about that one for a long time. He is a guy who fights for this team, and in doing that, he got hurt. Prayers and hopes for the best. That one sucks.”

Beckham will finish his second campaign in Cleveland with 23 receptions for 319 yards and four total touchdowns across seven appearances. He had 74 receptions for 1,035 yards and four touchdowns last year, marking the least productive season of his career outside of 2017, when he played only four games.

The Browns acquired Beckham in a blockbuster trade with the New York Giants in March 2019. He will turn 28 on Nov. 5 and is signed through the 2023 season.

Beckham is on the books for $15.75 million in 2021, with $12.8 million of it guaranteed for injury.

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