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Elon Musk: Tesla is open to supply software, powertrains & batteries to other automakers – Electrek.co

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CEO Elon Musk says that Tesla is currently open to licensing software and supply powertrains and batteries to other automakers struggling to make electric cars.

Recently, we reported on automakers admitting that Tesla has a lead on several key areas of developing and building electric vehicles.

Volkswagen has been quite open about the fact that it has fallen behind when it comes to software and that Tesla has taken the lead.

Hebert Diess, Chairman of Volkswagen, even said that the company is implementing what he internally called the “Tesla catch-up plan” in order to close the software gap between the German automaker and Tesla.

Now Tesla CEO Elon Musk said that they are willing to help.

In response to those recent comments, Musk wrote on Twitter:

“Tesla is open to licensing software and supplying powertrains and batteries. We’re just trying to accelerate sustainable energy, not crush competitors!”

The CEO even said that Tesla would be willing to license Autopilot – though he had said in the past that it would be difficult to implement.

There’s a limit though. Tesla is not going to share its in-car fart machine technology:

Tesla used to supply powertrains and batteries to Mercedes-Benz and Toyota, who both used to be Tesla shareholders, but they stopped back in 2015 after ending all their programs.

Back in 2014, Musk announced that Tesla is “open-sourcing” its patents to help other automakers accelerate electric vehicle development.

However, the move has been criticized for not being “open-sourcing” in the true sense of the word since Tesla only “pledged” not to sue any company using its patented technology “in good faith”.

The difference resulted in not many companies actually using Tesla’s patented technology.

The only company who openly admitted to using Tesla’s patented technology is the Chinese automaker Xpeng, who Tesla actually ended up suing – although not over the use of patented technology but over allegedly stealing the Autopilot source code.

Electrek’s Take

I don’t think that’s going to happen.

When Tesla stopped supplying powertrains and batteries to Daimler and Toyota, Elon said that Tesla was constrained by battery supply and needed all the batteries it could get for its own electric vehicle production.

This seems to still be true today and for the foreseeable future according to comment Elon made as recently as last week.

On the other side, automakers need to want to rely on Tesla for those and there might be a few interested parties, but I think most automakers want to develop their own expertise in what is becoming the new life and blood of the auto industry.

As for software, I don’t know what that would look like.

I know about software licensing deals in the auto industry like what Polestar has with Google’s Android, but I am not sure Tesla could have a similar deal.

There’s also battery management software, Autopilot software, over-the-air update software, and many other uses of software inside the cars.

I’d be curious how a licensing deal for some of those products would look like.

What do you think? Let us know in the comment section below.

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Video: Woman refuses to wear mask, asked to leave Kelowna LUSH – News 1130

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KELOWNA (NEWS 1130) — A tense exchange filmed at a Kelowna mall shows a woman arguing with staff at a LUSH Cosmetics store after they told her she had to leave because she wasn’t wearing a mask.

The confrontation in Orchard Park Shopping Centre was filmed and posted to social media by the woman and comes at a time when B.C.’s COVID-19 numbers are still high.

The woman refused to wear a mask when she entered the store, then said staff and security were breaching her human rights by not allowing her to browse.

The woman can be heard in the video speaking to a masked security guard.

“Explain to me how my human rights, with my medical condition, I cannot walk through a store when it’s totally fine for me to walk through a store.”

When asked to provide a medical note, the woman said she didn’t need to and instead said she could show her “puffer,” before saying that was none of the security guard’s business.

While there isn’t a provincial mandate on masks, they are encouraged to slow the spread of COVID-19.

But it is a policy for the store and has been since mid-July.

A spokesperson for LUSH tells NEWS 1130 they support how the staff handled the situation calmly and compassionately, and remain committed to ensuring the policy is followed.

“The health and safety of our staff and community remains top priority as we continue to navigate these challenging times together.”

The camera later pans over slightly to show three staff members, also wearing masks, and the woman accuses them of harassment.

“All I’m doing is looking in LUSH,” she says.

Staff suggest the woman instead shop online, but she refuses, saying “I want to browse here in the store.”

After multiple requests, the security guard says they might have to call the police if the woman doesn’t leave. He reminds her it is private property and she had been told to go.

Once the woman is given the number for the head office, she turns to leave.

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Woman refuses to wear mask at LUSH, films altercation

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A Lake Country woman claims she was the victim of “commie intimidation” after she was asked to leave Kelowna’s LUSH Cosmetics Thursday for refusing to wear a mask.

In a video that is not publicly available on her Facebook page, Susan Roth Drazdoff Faechner is seen arguing with a security guard and three female employees after she was refused service and told to leave LUSH for refusing to wear a face covering – which is company policy.

In the video, she describes the employees’ conduct as “commie intimidation.”

“I have the right to say no to a mask,” Faechner told Castanet. “I went in for an anniversary present for my husband. I picked up one thing I was going to buy. I turned around, I was ready to go, and security is there asking for my medical information.”

In the video, the security guard asks Faechner for a medical note after she tells him she can’t wear a mask due to her medical condition. When Faechner declines, the security guard explains that it’s store policy for customers to wear a face covering while inside. When Faechner argues the store is “public property to walk on,” the security guard says it is, in fact, private property.

“I know the law, and I know my constitutional human rights,” she says to the security guard.

“I felt like I was under, I don’t want to sound dramatic, but it was like great grievous bodily mental harm,” Faechner told Castanet. “Not that they were going to beat me up, but it was causing me extreme stress. When they came up to me it was like holy cow, I’m under attack and I’m all alone.

“This is like communism like, ‘you get out otherwise we call the police.’ Thats intimidation.”

Faechner says after the video ended she left peacefully as she didn’t want to escalate the situation further.

LUSH Kelowna manager Spence Dagneau says the incident with Faechner was one of the first times a customer has gotten upset about the mask policy.

“[The staff members] were pretty shaken up for the rest of the day but we have a really small, tight-knit group here and they’re all feeling pretty confident again today so its nice to see,” Dagneau said.

All LUSH stores across North America mandated face coverings on July 18, 2020.

“Shoppers who wish to enter a store but do not have their own face covering will be provided with one, or can choose contactless ordering instead by remaining outside the store while staff assist,” the LUSH website states. “The change comes following new guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control, along with our ongoing commitment to the safety of our customers, staff and overall community.”

Other retailers like Walmart and Real Canadian Superstore have also chosen to mandate the use of masks inside their stores.

But, echoing sentiments from a vocal minority in the community, Faechner says the mask rules infringe on her human rights.

“Masks are a freedom of choice,” she says. “Wear it, or don’t. Know your information, know what you’re talking about. You shouldn’t blindly wear a mask because some organization is telling you to do it.”

Faechner says after the incident she went to a different store in the shopping centre and was given service without a mask. She says she’ll no longer be shopping at LUSH stores.

“I call myself a Christ crusader and people with faith, they don’t just outright lie because they have a creator that they have to answer to at some point,” she says. “I’m not going to outright lie, I just think something’s happened to humans where we’ve just lost our sense of humanity.”

Faechner acknowledges the COVID-19 virus exists, but doesn’t trust the numbers of cases and deaths published by the government. To date, 223 British Columbians have died from COVID-19.

Source: – Kelowna News – Castanet.net

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Restaurateurs speak out against anti-mask patrons mistreating staff – CBC.ca

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Stephen Deere, owner of Modern Steak, says that when it comes to Calgary’s bylaw mandating face coverings in indoor public spaces, he thinks he jinxed himself.

“I was kind of bragging to my friends in the restaurant community that we’ve had almost no problems, at all,” Deere said. “But the last 24 to 48 hours, things have gotten worse.”

Servers at Modern Steak restaurant wear masks, as mandated by the bylaw. In response, one patron took to social media to attempt to trend #BoycottModernSteak online — but Deere said another incident was much more serious.

“Basically, it’s going to move forward in a legal fashion, that’s how bad it was. I can’t talk about it,” he said.

“But that should sound the alarm … we’re at the point that we’re having discussions, if the last 48 hours continue moving forward, we have to actually consider having security in our restaurants to keep our employees safe.”

Calgary council voted earlier this month to keep masks mandatory for now, with an update coming in December. Masks have also been mandatory in Edmonton in public spaces since Aug. 1.

Fines can be issued and AHS has the power to close businesses and restaurants for non-compliance.

“We’re in a democracy, and I believe you have the right to have your opinion and you have the right to protest,” Deere said. “But when you’re taking it out on the front-line workers and retail and hospitality, and they’re feeling threatened up to the point that violence could occur, it’s time to ring the alarm.

“We are not making the rules. We are following the rules.”

Varied experiences

By and large, Ernie Tsu, owner of Trolley 5 on 17th Avenue S.W. in Calgary, said most issues relating to the bylaw are solved at the door before guests enter the brewpub.

But given his role with the Alberta Hospitality Association, he knows restaurants across Alberta have experienced issues. 

“The concerns are related to the bad apples out there that refuse to follow the mandate,” Tsu said. “The people causing issues at restaurants are also the people that are causing issues in malls and any public spaces that they’re deemed to wear a mask in.”

Ernie Tsu, owner of Trolley 5, said people who don’t understand what has been mandated by the government should not frequent local restaurants at this time. (Dave Gilson/CBC)

Brett Ireland, CEO of Bear Hill Brewing — which operates establishments in Banff, Jasper, Calgary and Fort McMurray — said most guests have been compliant with local policies.

“We have had a number of guests who choose not to wear them because they have pre-existing conditions,” Ireland said. “That’s what they tell us, and certainly we’re not in a position to make a judgment on that.”

Ireland said whether or not patrons agree with the mask bylaws from a political standpoint, there are other reasons to comply with the bylaw.

“The other way to look at it for me is, it makes other people more comfortable and therefore more likely to participate in the economy,” Ireland said. “I just don’t see how there’s any net negative to it.”

‘Disgusted and utterly upset’

Deere said his restaurant was already having issues with staffing amidst the pandemic, and harassment from customers has exacerbated that struggle. 

“In our business, many of our hostesses are younger women that are 18 to 22,” he said. “When a larger, older gentleman is threatening them, they don’t come back to work the next day.”

As a born and raised Calgarian, Deere said he was “disgusted and utterly upset” with the behaviour of some patrons — and urged those who disagreed with the bylaw to take their concerns elsewhere.

“Calgary is better than this. We have been known around the world, and definitely in Canada, as one of the friendliest cities,” he said.

“We help people out, we have a western hospitality spirit, and this is how we’re acting? It’s unbelievable that we’ve gone in this direction.”

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