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Elon Musk's SpaceX gives wildfire-ravaged towns internet access – Daily Mail

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Elon Musk’s SpaceX provides Washington towns ravaged by wildfires with early access to its Starlink internet in a bid to help first responders battling the blazes

  • Parts of Washington are without internet due to wildfires 
  • SpaceX is lending a hand by giving towns early access to its Starlink internet 
  • The firm has provided officials with seven terminals to access the internet
  • First responders are using it to locate fires and areas in need of assistance 

Elon Musk‘s SpaceX is lending a hand to the first responders battling wildfires in Washington by providing them with internet from space.

The firm provided the Washington Emergency Management Division seven ‘UFO on a stick’ user terminals to receive internet from Starlink satellites in low orbit.

Officials say the satellites have doubled the bandwidth and produced more than 150 percent decrease in latency.

The terminals are currently being used near Malden, which was devastated by wildfires, and another is located near a smaller fire dubbed the Sumner-Grade Wildfire in western Washington.

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Elon Musk's SpaceX is lending a hand to the first responders battling wildfires in Washington by providing them with internet from space. The firm provided the Washington Emergency Management Division seven 'UFO on a stick' user terminals to receive internet from Starlink satellites in low orbit

Elon Musk’s SpaceX is lending a hand to the first responders battling wildfires in Washington by providing them with internet from space. The firm provided the Washington Emergency Management Division seven ‘UFO on a stick’ user terminals to receive internet from Starlink satellites in low orbit

Musk’s firm was able to assist these towns due to the satellites being in the right position.

‘Glad SpaceX could help! We are prioritizing emergency responders & locations with no Internet connectivity at all,’ the CEO shared in a tweet.

Eric Rosenberry, an Oregon resident, reached out to SpaceX with the hopes of obtaining the same service for Mckenzie Bridge and Rainbow that are also battling wildfires and have been left without internet.

‘Starlink reached out and sadly the impacted areas are not under their coverage pattern to provide reliable service,’ Rosenberry shared on Twitter.

Musk's firm was able to assist these towns due to the satellites being in the right position

Musk's firm was able to assist these towns due to the satellites being in the right position

Musk’s firm was able to assist these towns due to the satellites being in the right position 

SpaceX launched its first batch of Starlink satellites on May 23, 2019, marking the beginning of its journey to provide the world with internet – specifically rural regions.

Today the firm has a total of 775 devices in low orbit and has noted in the past that it just needs 800 to offer a full service.

SpaceX plans to launch at least 2,200 satellites over the next five years in order to offer a global broadband service covering even the most remote areas of the world.

However, the two towns in Washington received early access due to the devastating fires that have charred miles of internet fiber cables.

The terminals are currently being used near Malden, which was devastated by wildfires, and another is located near a smaller fire dubbed the Sumner-Grade Wildfire in western Washington

The terminals are currently being used near Malden, which was devastated by wildfires, and another is located near a smaller fire dubbed the Sumner-Grade Wildfire in western Washington

The terminals are currently being used near Malden, which was devastated by wildfires, and another is located near a smaller fire dubbed the Sumner-Grade Wildfire in western Washington

The towns are without internet due to fires burning internet cables.  Officials say Starlink doubles the bandwidth compared to traditional internet satellites and there is more than 150 percent decreases in latency.

The towns are without internet due to fires burning internet cables.  Officials say Starlink doubles the bandwidth compared to traditional internet satellites and there is more than 150 percent decreases in latency.

The towns are without internet due to fires burning internet cables.  Officials say Starlink doubles the bandwidth compared to traditional internet satellites and there is more than 150 percent decreases in latency.

Richard Hall, the emergency telecommunications leader of the Washington State Military Department’s IT division, told CNBC: ‘I have never set up any tactical satellite equipment that has been as quick to set up, and anywhere near as reliable.’

He also shared that Starlink doubles the bandwidth compared to traditional internet satellites and there is more than 150 percent decreases in latency.

Traditional services can take anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour to establish a connection, but Hall told CNBC that Starlink was working in just 10 minutes.

According to The Verge, the terminals have helped responders identify areas in need of water to put out fires, along with locations that require additional supplies and resources.

In Malden, the service is being used by the public as they rebuilt their town.

SpaceX is currently in the midst of a private beta test of its Starlink internet, with public beta expected to follow after.

ELON MUSK’S SPACEX SET TO BRING BROADBAND INTERNET TO THE WORLD WITH ITS STARLINK CONSTELLATION OF SATELLITS

Elon Musk’s SpaceX has launched the fifth batch of its ‘Starlink’ space internet satellites – taking the total to 300.

They form a constellation of thousands of satellites, designed to provide low-cost broadband internet service from low Earth orbit.

The constellation, informally known as Starlink, and under development at SpaceX’s facilities in Redmond, Washington.

Its goal is to beam superfast internet into your home from space.

While satellite internet has been around for a while, it has suffered from high latency and unreliable connections.

Starlink is different. SpaceX says putting a ‘constellation’ of satellites in low earth orbit would provide high-speed, cable-like internet all over the world.

The billionaire’s company wants to create the global system to help it generate more cash.

Musk has previously said the venture could give three billion people who currently do not have access to the internet a cheap way of getting online.

It could also help fund a future city on Mars.

Helping humanity reach the red planet is one of Musk’s long-stated aims and was what inspired him to start SpaceX.

The company recently filed plans with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to launch 4,425 satellites into orbit above the Earth – three times as many that are currently in operation.

‘Once fully deployed, the SpaceX system will pass over virtually all parts of the Earth’s surface and therefore, in principle, have the ability to provide ubiquitous global service,’ the firm said.

‘Every point on the Earth’s surface will see, at all times, a SpaceX satellite.’

The network will provide internet access to the US and the rest of the world, it added.

It is expected to take more than five years and $9.8 billion (£7.1bn) of investment, although satellite internet has proved an expensive market in the past and analysts expect the final bill will be higher.

Musk compared the project to ‘rebuilding the internet in space’, as it would reduce reliance on the existing network of undersea fibre-optic cables which criss-cross the planet.

In the US, the FCC welcomed the scheme as a way to provide internet connections to more people.

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Utah monolith mystery: Wildlife officials' 12-ft desert discovery – Daily Mail

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Mystery of the 12-ft metal monolith discovered in middle of Utah desert – and it looks eerily similar to the machines in Space Odyssey

  • State workers in a helicopter noticed the shiny marker while flying overhead
  • About 10 to 12 feet tall, it’s planted in the ground and not dropped from above
  • There are no identifying markings and no one has claimed responsibility
  • Utah has a history of ‘land art’ placed in the desert far from population centers 

Government workers had a close encounter of the strange kind out in the Utah desert.

A crew with the state wildlife resources department was aboard a Utah Department of Public Safety helicopter when they spotted a mysterious monolith sticking out of the dirt last week.

About 10 to 12 feet tall, the shiny metal object was firmly planted in the ground, suggesting it wasn’t just dropped from above.

Officials suggest it could be have been constructed by an artist or a huge fan of 2001: Space Odyssey – the structure resembles the machines found in Arthur C. Clarke’s story.

The unlabeled object is located inside a red rock cove but, fearful amateurs could endanger themselves trying to get a closer look, the workers have withheld details about its exact location.

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Worker with Utah's wildlife resources department spotted a shiny metal monolith in the desert. The object is between 10 and 12 feet tall and is firmly planted in the ground

Worker with Utah’s wildlife resources department spotted a shiny metal monolith in the desert. The object is between 10 and 12 feet tall and is firmly planted in the ground

The team was in the remote area to count bighorn sheep when they spotted the unidentified object.

‘One of the biologists is the one who spotted it and we just happened to fly directly over the top of it,’ pilot Bret Hutchings told KSL-TV. ‘He was like, ‘Whoa, whoa, whoa, turn around, turn around!’ And I was like, ‘what.’ And he’s like, ‘There’s this thing back there – we’ve got to go look at it!’

After the copter circled back and landed, the crew went into the cove to investigate.

‘We were thinking, Is this something NASA stuck up there or something? Are they bouncing satellites off it?’ Hutchings said.

Officials suggest it could be have been constructed by an artist or a huge fan of 2001: Space Odyssey - the structure resembles the machines found in Arthur C. Clarke's story (pictured)

Officials suggest it could be have been constructed by an artist or a huge fan of 2001: Space Odyssey – the structure resembles the machines found in Arthur C. Clarke’s story (pictured) 

The team was in the remote area to count bighorn sheep when they spotted the unidentified object

The team was in the remote area to count bighorn sheep when they spotted the unidentified object

'We were thinking, Is this something NASA stuck up there or something? Are they bouncing satellites off it?' said Department of Public Safety pilot Bret Hutchings

‘We were thinking, Is this something NASA stuck up there or something? Are they bouncing satellites off it?’ said Department of Public Safety pilot Bret Hutchings

State workers climb the monolith to give a sense of its size. A biologist with the wildlife resources office spotted the object from the sky, prompting the crew to land and investigate

State workers climb the monolith to give a sense of its size. A biologist with the wildlife resources office spotted the object from the sky, prompting the crew to land and investigate

‘We were kind of joking around that if one of us suddenly disappears, then the rest of us make a run for it.’

All jokes aside, Hutchings believes the structure is probably some kind of artwork.

‘I’m assuming it’s some new wave artist or something or, you know, somebody that was a big [2001: A Space Odyssey] fan,’ he said.

Department of Public Safety pilot Bret Hutchings told KSL-TV the unmarked object 'is about the strangest thing that I've come across out there in all my years of flying,'

Department of Public Safety pilot Bret Hutchings told KSL-TV the unmarked object ‘is about the strangest thing that I’ve come across out there in all my years of flying,’

The monolith is located inside a red rock cove but workers have withheld details about its exact location to prevent others from endangering themselves trying to get a closer look

The monolith is located inside a red rock cove but workers have withheld details about its exact location to prevent others from endangering themselves trying to get a closer look

Utah has a history of ‘land art,’ unusual installations that cropped up far from population centers in the 1960s and ’70s.

The most famous, Spiral Jetty, a 1,500-foot-long coil by artist Robert Smithson in 1970 that’s composed entirely of mud, salt crystals and basalt.

Located on the northeastern edge of the Great Salt Lake near Rozel Point, the jetty appears and disappears depending on water levels.

Utah has a history of 'land art,' unusual installations far from population centers. Located on the northeastern edge of the Great Salt Lake, artist Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty is made of mud, salt and basalt rock

Utah has a history of ‘land art,’ unusual installations far from population centers. Located on the northeastern edge of the Great Salt Lake, artist Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty is made of mud, salt and basalt rock

So far, no one has stepped forward to claim responsibility for the monolith, though.

‘That’s been about the strangest thing that I’ve come across out there in all my years of flying,’ Hutchings said.

The workers took video and photos of the object, but left in place.

So far, it hasn’t disturbed the bighorn sheep that live in the southern half of Utah.

Their population was once down to under a thousand in the 1970s, but conservation efforts have seen them make a big comeback in recent decades.

The crew was in the remote area to count bighorn sheep, which live in the southern half of Utah

The crew was in the remote area to count bighorn sheep, which live in the southern half of Utah

The sheep are less wary of people in early December, which is their mating season.

‘Because they’re focused on courtship and breeding, they’ll allow vehicles to get closer to them than they normally would,’ Brent Stettler of Utah Division of Wildlife Resources told My National Parks Trip Media.

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A 2020 space oddity? Mysterious metal object found in Utah desert – cjoy.com

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A mysterious slab of metal stands silently in the desert, leaving Earth’s primates puzzled.

That’s how the Stanley Kubrick film 2001: A Space Odyssey begins. It’s also the way things are playing out in Utah in 2020, after biologists made a baffling discovery in the state’s southern desert.

Read more:
Famous alien-hunting telescope shut down to avoid ‘catastrophic failure’

State wildlife officials say they were counting bighorn sheep from a helicopter last Wednesday when they stumbled upon a mysterious slab of metal sticking up out of the rock. The object stood 3-3.7 metres tall and appeared to be completely solid and undecorated, according to a crew from the Utah Department of Public Safety and the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.

Its true origin is unknown.

“One of the biologists is the one who spotted it and we just happened to fly directly over the top of it,” helicopter pilot Bret Hutchings told Utah broadcaster KSLTV.

Read more:
Mysterious radio signal from space traced to ‘zombie’ in our galaxy

Hutchings and the crew of biologists touched down nearby and ventured down into a red-rock cove to examine the object up close.

Video shows it’s a solid piece of metal standing as tall as two humans.

“The intrepid explorers go down to investigate the alien life form,” one crew member said with a chuckle, in video they later provided to KSLTV.

Hutchings says the group had some fun with the discovery, though they still don’t know exactly they’re dealing with.

“We were joking around that if one of us suddenly disappears, I guess the rest of us make a run for it,” Hutchings said.

The object appeared to have been planted in place and likely did not fall into position from above, Hutchings said.

State officials did not indicate exactly where they found the monolith because it was in a remote area that is dangerous for hikers. They say they’d rather not inspire amateur adventurers to go out looking for it in hopes of solving the mystery.

Read more:
‘Hell’ planet found with lava oceans, rocky rain and supersonic winds

“That’s been about the strangest thing that I’ve come across out there in all my years of flying,” Hutchings said.

He added that the object is probably an art installation or a tribute to Kubrick’s film.

The opening scene of 2001: A Space Odyssey depicts a race of ape-like human ancestors who swarm over a mysterious slab of metal that suddenly appears in their rocky home. One of the apes learns how to use tools a short time after the object appears.

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No members of the helicopter crew have reported any incredible scientific discoveries to date, but that hasn’t stopped people from speculating about the object’s origin.

The Utah Highway Patrol encouraged followers to guess about the object’s purpose, triggering a slew of guesses about aliens, wormholes, interdimensional portals and Kubrick’s film.

Many users called for the object to be left alone, if only to avoid any further misfortunes during a historically weird 2020.

“If I were y’all I’d wait until at least 2021, maybe 2022 for good measure, before touching it,” one user wrote.

“PUT IT BACK!” another user wrote. “We’ve had enough surprises this year.”

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Scientists produce diamonds in minutes at room temperature – MINING.com

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“Natural diamonds are usually formed over billions of years, about 150 kilometres deep in the Earth where there are high pressures and temperatures above 1,000 degrees Celsius,”  Jodie Bradby, professor at The Australian National University and one of the authors of the study, said in a media statement.

“The twist in this story is how we apply the pressure. As well as very high pressures, we allow the carbon to also experience something called ‘shear’ – which is like a twisting or sliding force. We think this allows the carbon atoms to move into place and form Lonsdaleite and regular diamond.” 

The RMIT team’s pictures showed that the regular diamonds only form in the middle of these Lonsdaleite veins under this new method. (Image courtesy of the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology).

To observe and understand how this process works, the researchers used advanced electron microscopy techniques to capture solid and intact slices from the experimental samples to create snapshots of how the two types of diamonds formed.

The pictures showed that the regular diamonds only form in the middle of Lonsdaleite veins under this new method.

“Seeing these little ‘rivers’ of Lonsdaleite and regular diamond for the first time was just amazing and really helps us understand how they might form,” Dougal McCulloch, the study’s lead author and a professor at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, said. 

According to the scientists, Lonsdaleite has the potential to be used for cutting through ultra-solid materials on mining sites. As such, they said that creating more of this rare diamond is the long-term aim of their work.

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