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England to host 2025 Women’s Rugby World Cup

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World Rugby (WR) has named England as the host nation for the 2025 Women’s Rugby World Cup.

In addition, WR also unanimously approved Australia as hosts for the men’s World Cup in 2027 and the women’s in 2029 with the United States (US) hosting the men’s tournament for the first time in 2031 and the women’s in 2033.

WR is hoping to generate US$1 billion from the World Cup in 2031 as it seeks to tap into the US’ vast sporting culture and commercial potential.

“The USA is the golden nugget everyone wants to get a hold of. It’s the world’s biggest sporting market,” said WR chairperson, Sir Bill Beaumont.

2031 and 2033 World Cups have 25 or so venue bids on the table from all over the country. WR delegates have already been shown around the Denver Bronco’s impressive Empower Field home. One possibility could see the tournament start in the west of the country and gradually move east. There is also the possibility of using localized pools, where each group plays in a different part of the country before congregating for its grand finish.

The whole process is expected to cost in the region of US$500 million and has already received bipartisan support, alongside the seal of approval from President Joe Biden, who wrote a letter to Sir Beaumont promising regulatory support and infrastructural guarantees.

In the US, there have been many attempts to crack the market, but none have yet succeeded. However, the continued presence of rugby in the Olympics, the growing footprint of Major League Rugby (MLR) and an acceptance of where things went wrong in the past, means there is optimism around the next decade.

The US men’s team faces one of the biggest games in their history in June when they have their two-legged playoff against Chile for a spot in the 2023 Rugby World Cup scheduled to take place in France from the 8th of September to the 28th of October 2023.

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Nick Kyrgios and Stefanos Tsitsipas fined after fiery Wimbledon match – CTV News

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Nick Kyrgios and Stefanos Tsitsipas have both been fined following their fiery third-round match at Wimbledon on Saturday.

World No. 5 Tsitsipas was handed a US$10,000 fine for unsportsmanlike conduct — the joint-highest single fine of the tournament so far.

After the match, he apologized for hitting a ball into the stands, which is deemed a separate offense in the grand slam rulebook.

Kyrgios, who won the match in four sets and faces USA’s Brandon Nakashima in the fourth round on Monday, was fined $4,000 for an audible obscenity.

That means the Australian has been fined US$14,000 so far this tournament, having been sanctioned for spitting in the direction of a spectator he said was disrespecting him during his first-round match against Britain’s Paul Jubb.

Following Saturday’s heated contest, Tsitsipas and Kyrgios continued to trade barbs off the court — the Greek fourth seed calling his opponent “evil” and a “bully,” while Kyrgios said Tsitsipas is “not liked” in the locker room.

“I did nothing towards Stefanos today that was disrespectful,” he added. “I was not drilling him with balls. To come in here and say I bullied him, that’s just soft.”

Kyrgios has attracted controversy for his on-court behavior throughout his career, but at this year’s Wimbledon he has also played some of his best tennis — notably as he swept past Filip Krajinovic is just an hour and 25 minutes in the second round.

The 27-year-old has reached the quarterfinals of a grand slam on two previous occasions — a record he could equal by beating Nakashima when the pair meet on Centre Court.

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Daughter of Toronto Blue Jays coach killed in 'terrible accident' while tubing on US river – CP24 Toronto's Breaking News

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The 17-year-old daughter of Toronto Blue Jays’ first base coach died in a “terrible accident” while tubing in the U.S. this weekend.

The team announced the passing of Julia Budzinski on Sunday morning after Mark Budzinkski left the Blue Jays’ dugout early in the second game of a doubleheader against the Tampa Bay Rays on Saturday.

According to Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources spokesperson Paige Pearson, two girls were on a tube being pulled behind a boat on James River in Virginia this weekend when they fell off.

She said the driver of the boat turned around in an attempt to pick up the girls to get them out of the water.

“When the boat came to get the girls, a wave came and essentially put the boat over the victim and the propeller struck her,” Pearson told CTV News Toronto.

She said the boat driver immediately jumped into the river to rescue the girl, as did another passing boat operator.

“Once they got the girl out of the water, they rushed back for help,” she said. “She was taken to land, but was pronounced dead.”

Pearson said no foul play is suspected, and alcohol was not a factor in the incident.

“It was a terrible accident,” she said.

In a statement released by the Blue Jays on Sunday, the team said the entire organization is grieving the loss of Julia.

“I have known Bud for more than 25 years and have always admired his commitment as a dad and husband first,” said Ross Atkins, executive vice president of baseball operations and general manager of the Blue Jays.

“He is loved and well-respected by our entire clubhouse and holds a special place in all our hearts.”

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Tsitsipas calls Kyrgios bully after Wimbledon hubbub, loss – CTV News

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WIMBLEDON, England –

Nick Kyrgios cursed at the Wimbledon chair umpire and asked, “Are you dumb?” He demanded to see a Grand Slam supervisor after questioning why his opponent, Stefanos Tsitsipas, didn’t forfeit their ever-contentious, never-boring match for angrily hitting a ball into the stands after dropping the second set.

Unsatisfied with the response, Kyrgios asked, “What are you talking about, bro?” Then came this: “Bro, bring out more supervisors. I’m not done. Bring ’em all out. I don’t care. I’m not playing until we get to the bottom of this.”

Narrator: He did continue to play Saturday. And the unpredictable, unseeded Kyrgios won 6-7 (2), 6-4, 6-3, 7-6 (7) to reach the fourth round at the All England Club for the first time since 2016 — then was criticized by the No. 4-seeded Tsitsipas for having “a very evil side.”

“It’s constant bullying. That’s what he does. He bullies the opponents,” said Tsitsipas, the 2021 French Open runner-up, who also lost to Kyrgios on grass at a tournament in Halle, Germany, last month. “He was probably a bully at school himself. I don’t like bullies.”

There was more, so much more, from underarm serves hit by the Kyrgios — including one between his legs — to the three shots purposely smacked right at him by Tsitsipas. A total of three code violations were called by chair umpire Damien Dumusois, one on Kyrgios for an audible obscenity, and two on Tsitsipas for ball abuse, earning a point penalty.

Told of Tsitsipas’ “bully” comment, Kyrgios laughed and shook his head.

“He was the one hitting balls at me. He was the one who hit a spectator. … I didn’t do anything. Apart from me going back and forth with the umpire, I did nothing toward Stefanos today that was disrespectful, I don’t think,” Kyrgios said at his news conference, wearing a T-shirt with former NBA player Dennis Rodman’s name on it.

“If he’s affected by that today, then that’s what’s holding him back,” Kyrgios said about Tsitsipas. “Because someone can just do that, and that’s going to throw him off his game like that? I just think it’s soft.”

There even was some terrific tennis along the way, with the players combining for 118 winners. It all took three hours, 17 minutes, with nary a dull moment, and finished so late that the retractable roof at No. 1 Court was shut and the artificial lights turned on midway through the fourth set.

Tsitsipas held a pair of set points to force a fifth, but Kyrgios saved both, the latter with a half-volley winner after serving-and-volleying on a second serve.

Kyrgios, a 27-year-old from Australia, converted his second match point with a drop shot, then roared. That sort of skill has always been evident from Kyrgios, who twice has been a Grand Slam quarterfinalist. Also long obvious: Kyrgios often appears more interested in entertaining or arguing than in doing whatever it takes to finish on the right side of the score.

On Saturday, during one changeover midway through the fourth set, Kyrgios sat in his chair, barking between bites on a banana. Was he shouting at an official? At the folks seated in his guest box? At himself? Hard to know with him, sometimes.

He was fined US$10,000 by the tournament for unsportsmanlike conduct at his first-round match, which he ended by spitting in the direction of a spectator he said was heckling him. It is the largest of the 22 prize money penalties issued in Week 1.

Kyrgios has a history of crossing the line during matches. In 2019, he was placed on a six-month probation by the ATP Tour after being fined $113,000 for eight infractions at a tournament. Earlier that season, he was defaulted from a match at the Italian Open after throwing a chair. In 2016, he was suspended by the ATP for not trying to win and for insulting fans during the Shanghai Masters.

His issues with Dumusois began in the first set, when he was disturbed by a reversed call by a line judge and wanted that official removed. Didn’t happen.

“There comes a point where you really get tired of it, let’s say,” said Tsitsipas, a 23-year-old from Greece. “The constant talking, the constant complaining.”

After Kyrgios broke to grab the second set, Tsitsipas swatted a ball with a backhand into the crowd. The ball appeared to ricochet off a wall, but what wasn’t entirely clear was whether it landed on anyone.

Tsitsipas apologized for that afterward, saying it stemmed from frustration created by “all the circus show going on, on the other side of the net.”

“I didn’t hit any people. It did hit the wall, thank God,” he said, and acknowledged he was trying to hit his foe with some other balls aimed right at his body. “For sure I’m never doing that again. It’s my responsibility, for sure.”

That drew just a warning from Dumusois, which didn’t sit well with Kyrgios.

“You can’t hit a ball into the crowd and hit someone and not get defaulted,” Kyrgios said, bringing up the episode at the 2020 U.S. Open involving Novak Djokovic, who was ejected from a match after inadvertently hitting a ball that struck a line judge in the throat.

At one point, Kyrgios told Dumusois: “You don’t know how to play, so how about you don’t tell me how to play? … Bro, the people want to see me, not you.”

They will get another chance to see Kyrgios on Monday, when he faces Brandon Nakashima for a spot in the quarterfinals. Nakashima is one of four American men in the fourth round, the most at Wimbledon since 1999.

The other men’s matches Monday will be 22-time major champion Rafael Nadal against No. 21 Botic van de Zandschulp, No. 11 Taylor Fritz against qualifier Jason Kubler, and No. 19 Alex de Minaur against Cristian Garin.

Nadal’s 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 victory over No. 27 Lorenzo Sonego was nowhere near as off-the-rails as Kyrgios vs. Tsitsipas, but it had its own bit of back-and-forth between the players over etiquette.

Nadal didn’t like that Sonego’s grunts were too loud and stretched out too long. Sonego didn’t like that Nadal beckoned him to talk at the net about it.

Unlike Kyrgios and Tsitsipas, though, they settled their differences in the locker room afterward.

“I have to say,” Nadal said at his news conference, “that I was wrong.”

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