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Expressing emotions through art – Vancouver Island University News

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Michaela Medina has always loved art.

However, it wasn’t until last year that she found her medium – ceramics. She was introduced to the “ancient simplicity” of the art form during a course with VIU Visual Art Professor Scott Leaf.

“Ceramics has, to a certain extent, allowed me to let go of my fear of failure and rigid perfectionism so I could truly explore and discover my artistic style,” she says.

The third-year student is completing a Bachelor of Education degree with a minor in history. She hopes to become a high school teacher and help young learners explore different concepts through art literacy. 

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

Michaela is one of three artists displaying their work during RockVIU’s interactive art exhibit. RockVIU is the University’s series of new student orientation events, taking place August 23 to September 3, 2021. The exhibit runs September 3 from 11 am to 5:30 pm at VIU’s Malaspina Theatre, Building 310. It features visual art displays and dance performances that reflect on what it means to “Matter Here” at VIU. 

We caught up with Michaela to learn about her art, inspiration and future aspirations.

What’s the story behind your creations and how do you feel you’ve expressed this?

I strive to express my message to students by using familiar imagery, which is intrinsic in nature, combining these with the application of light, in colours often associated with various emotions, on white ceramic. An ugly toad identifies the passing worries and anxieties that come with embarking on a new adventure. When I began university, I valued my independence and feigned confidence even though I felt overwhelmed about leaving my home and friends behind. The “frog-in-throat” feeling was soon replaced with excitement and hope. A small butterfly contains a light to spark hope and dispel thoughts and feelings that might hinder a student’s journey. This hope, brought on by breakthroughs in my relationship with God as my understanding of Him increased, was the anchor that motivated me to do well where I was regardless of my circumstances. A graceful bird represents the first healthy reflection a student might have after being welcomed to VIU, hopefully expressing a sense of peace and excitement. Feeling welcomed into my university community is what gave me the confidence I needed to explore and grow in my passions and chosen areas of study. Overall, my art reflects my journey as a first-year student that I hope others can identify with and learn from.

What reaction are you hoping to evoke from your audience when they see the exhibit?

Through my art, I hope to evoke a sense of assuredness that students have come to the right place as they insightfully reflect upon their transition from high school to VIU. This confidence will in turn allow them the freedom to explore and integrate with our community as they courageously take on the challenges of university and sculpt their personal and professional identities. My goal is to guide them through these emotions as they reflect on their lives and experiences with a focus on growth, to give them hope and inspiration to reach their full potential here.

What attracted you to your artistic medium? 

I had dabbled in clay throughout my education in art, but never understood many of the nuances involved in the molding, drying and firing processes until recently. The history, creation process and the wonderful ability for what I have made to be used in daily life have all contributed to this medium being one of my favourites.

What drew you to VIU and this program in particular?

I have always loved art and picked up on its technical skills fairly quickly and easily. My intention in VIU’s art program was to use the skills I had built up to expand creatively, something I had never felt free to do in high school. 

What are your future artistic aspirations? 

As my creative outlet, art has helped expand my ability to express concepts differently than in a strictly academic sense. Therefore, my goal is to become an art and history teacher to develop the artistic literacy of high school artists, inspiring them to be explorers, innovators and critical thinkers.

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Local Art Hives provide community space for creativity and healing – Sherbrooke Record

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Lawrence Belanger,

Local Journalism Initiative

As the wind and rain raged in the dark on a cold November weeknight, it was warm, bright, and dry in the Salle le Tremplin, where Lou-Philip and his friend Benjamin gathered paints and brushes for a project Benjamin was about to begin. All the while, fragments of music from an upright piano and acoustic guitar filled the room while several others sat at vinyl-covered tables working on paintings, sculptures, and more.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

Only open since last spring, the Art Hive held every Wednesday in Tremplin 16-30’s multi-purpose room is one of the region’s better-attended hives. Like most Art Hives, attendance is open to the public and free of charge.

Art Hives are a global movement, founded in Canada, to help like-minded people start community-based studios. At an Art Hive (Ruche d’art in French), anyone can work on self-directed artistic projects, with no instruction or direction. The concept was conceived by Janis Timm-Bottos, an art therapist and associate professor at Concordia University.

The history of Art Hives begins during the 1990s when Timm-Bottos was working in a community clinic serving the homeless in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

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Toronto Biennial of Art Appoints Curators

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The Toronto Biennial of Art has appointed Montreal curator Dominique Fontaine and Peruvian curator Miguel A. López as co-curators of its 2024 edition.

Fontaine, who was born in Haiti, is a founding director of aposteriori, a non-profit curatorial platform that produces diverse and innovative contemporary art. Her projects include curating Between the earth and the sky, the possibility of everything for Scotiabank Nuit Blanche in Toronto in 2014, and co-curating the survey exhibition Here, We Are Here: Black Canadian Contemporary, which showed at the Royal Ontario Museum and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts in 2018.

López worked as chief curator, and later as co-director, of TEOR/éTica in San José, Costa Rica, from 2015 to 2020. In 2019, he curated the retrospective exhibition Cecilia Vicuña: Seehearing the Enlightened Failure at the Witte de With (now Kunstinstituut Melly) in Rotterdam. The exhibition travelled to Mexico City, Madrid and Bogota.

Patrizia Libralato, the biennial’s executive director, said the two curators will contribute scholarship, innovation and inspiration to deepen the event’s connections to both local communities and global conversations.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

“Together, we aim to create an event as uniquely diverse, responsive, challenging and engaging as the city itself,” she said.

The biennial, which will run from Sept. 21 to Dec. 1, 2024, attracted more then 450,000 visitors to its first two editions, which featured free programming across the city.

It has featured work by artists such as AA Bronson, Judy Chicago, Brian Jungen, Tanya Lukin Linklater, Kapwani Kiwanga, Caroline Monnet, Denyse Thomasos and Camille Turner.


Source: Toronto Biennial of Art

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Football and art come together in the first NFT exhibition of its kind

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–  The King Abdulaziz Center for World Culture’s From Strike to Stroke exhibit features 64 FIFA World Cup match results in a unique man-machine collaboration

DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia, Dec. 6, 2022 /CNW/ — The King Abdulaziz Center for World Culture (Ithra) celebrates the art of the beautiful game in a unique exhibition at the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar. From Strike to Stroke features 64 NFTs by 32 artists from the competing nations, while Artificial Intelligence (AI) fuses the pieces from the contending two countries in each of the 64 matches into a unique piece based on the match outcome. The result will be a singular collection of one-of-a-kind NFTs created through a collaboration of man and machine. Strike to Stroke runs at the Msheireb Galleria Doha, Qatar until December 23.

Ithra, a cultural bridge between Saudi Arabia and the rest of the world, channels the world’s passion for football into its infatuation with the arts as the world comes together for the World Cup. The exhibition melds the man-made with the machine-made, and combines art, sport and technology in an innovative fashion.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

It features the work of 32 emerging and established artists, each tasked with creating a piece representing their country and using their respective team’s jersey colors. After each match, the AI-powered algorithm combines the artists’ creations with match statistics to generate unique pieces that represent each game. The collection will be a unique set of pieces presented as NFTs – non-fungible tokens. These cryptographic assets are based on blockchain technology, and created in a process similar to cryptocurrencies.

From Strike to Stroke includes artists who have never created NFTs and NFT artists who had not worked within traditional fine art.

“The passion shared by football fans for the love of the beautiful game can be tangential to the passion shared by art aesthetes,” said Dr. Shurooq Amin in her curator’s brief to the exhibition. “By connecting 32 artists from both the traditional and digital arenas, Ithra not only bridges the gap between Web2 to Web3, and between football and art, but furthermore between human and machine, as the artists collaborate with AI generation technology to create unique NFTs that combine art, football and technology.”

Visit www.striketostroke.com.

Images and exhibition catalogue can be found here.

For more information on Ithra and its programs, visit www.ithra.com.

Photo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1961775/Ithra_World_Cup_NFTs.jpg

SOURCE King Abdul Aziz Center for World Culture (Ithra)

For further information: Media contacts: Nour Aldajani, [email protected], +966-583268120, Nora Al Harthi, [email protected], Domia Abdi, [email protected], Hadeel Eisa, [email protected]

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