Family 'distraught' as search resumes for N.L. man who went missing at peak of historic blizzard - CBC.ca - Canada News Media
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Family 'distraught' as search resumes for N.L. man who went missing at peak of historic blizzard – CBC.ca

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The search has resumed for a Roaches Line, N.L., man who went missing as a blizzard intensified in eastern Newfoundland early Friday afternoon.

Bay Roberts RCMP, the Avalon North Wolverines Search and Rescue and a CH149 Cormorant from 9 Wing Gander are all part of the search for 26-year-old Josh Wall, as is an RCMP police dog.

“It is now believed that Joshua may have made it out of the wooded area, where he was walking to get to a friend’s home in Marysvale, and back onto Roaches Line,” an RCMP press release said Sunday. Roaches Line is a village in the area of Conception Bay North.

“Residents in the general area are asked to search their properties, vehicles, sheds and other outbuildings, in the event Joshua sought shelter there.”

Glenda Power, a civilian spokesperson for the RCMP, told CBC Sunday that attempts were made to search for Wall when he was reported missing, but the blizzard conditions hampered those efforts. 

Police received information that Wall may have taken side roads and trails, she said. A man was seen on Roaches Line yesterday, she said, but it’s not been confirmed that it was Wall.

The family is “distraught,” Power said, and concerned for Wall’s safety.

Anyone who has information is asked to call Bay Roberts RCMP at 709-786-2118.

‘I’m frantic’

Darkness halted the search for Wall Saturday evening.

“I’m frantic this morning,” his mother, Nora Wall, told CBC’s Terry Roberts on Sunday.

Josh Wall has been missing for almost 48 hours and his mother Nora says she is “frantic.” 5:36

Her son has not been heard from since 1 p.m. on Friday, just as the storm was intensifying.

Josh went into the woods around 12:30 p.m. on Friday, with plans to walk along a backcountry trail from his family’s home on Roaches Line to visit a friend in another Conception Bay community, Marysvale.

His parents said Josh has “health issues” and is prone to panic attacks.

He messaged his location in the wilderness to his friend in Marysvale around 1 p.m. on Friday, along with a message saying he was lost and that his phone’s battery was low on power, said Wayne Wall, Josh’s father. 

Wayne said his son was in pain Friday morning and wanted to go to the hospital, but the storm prevented them from travelling.

Josh later told his parents he was going to visit a friend in Marysvale, and decided to leave on foot.

Josh was wearing a heavy winter jacket and a warm hat, mittens and boots. But it’s not believed he was wearing snow pants.

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Canada's policy time bomb: Rising home prices and homelessness – CTV News

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OTTAWA —
When you watch the news or read the latest macroeconomic data, things in Canada seem good. Unemployment remains near historic lows, interest rates are under control and Canada is back on the list of the top 10 largest economies in the world. Sounds pretty good.

How is it that even with all this good news Canadians remain anxious about our economic state of affairs? Research suggests that there is a fundamental disconnect between the macroeconomic data and how people feel. Only a little more than 15 per cent of Canadians, according to the Bloomberg Nanos Canadian Confidence Index remain upbeat about the coming year and a significant number of Canadians are outright worried about a recession in 2020.

Views on real estate are a double-edged sword. Canadians who are homeowners feel better when they see housing prices in their neighbourhood rise but the other side of that sword is that for those Canadians that are not homeowners, rising prices make both homeownership more difficult to attain and affordable rentals more elusive to find.

In a new eye-popping national study on homelessness for the Ottawa Mission, a majority of Canadians reported that someone they cared about was at risk of being homeless. Only 35 per cent of respondents reported no one they cared for was at risk of being homeless (43 per cent reported a small risk, 15 per cent a medium risk, and five per cent a high risk). When you walk down the street in your neighbourhood, one in five of your neighbours have someone they care about and think that person may have a high or medium risk of being homeless.

The same study suggests that a majority of Canadians believe that the issue of homelessness will have a serious or somewhat serious impact on Canada as a country. If you live in the hot real estate market of British Columbia or you are a woman, this sentiment rises to eight in ten.

When you factor the current problem of homelessness and overlay population growth in Canada one should become even more concerned. Canada is among the fastest growing countries in the G7 and StatCan projects that Canada could have a population of 48.8 million people by 2050. The forces of population growth and lack of affordable housing will collide with inaction.

The good news is that Canadians do not lay finding a solution at the feet of one level of government. Asked who should be responsible for dealing with homelessness no clear player or level of government comes out way ahead. Twenty-three per cent cite the federal government, 18 per cent municipal and provincial governments, 14 per cent family and friends of the homeless and 16 per cent say everyone should be responsible. This speaks to the need to organize a common sense of purpose.

The unspoken truth is that Canadians are worried that someone they care about is at risk of being homeless. Everyone should take note of this policy time bomb.

Nik Nanos is the Chief Data Scientist for Nanos Research and the Official Pollster for CTV News

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B.C. woman calls for Canada to help extract daughter from quarantined Chinese city – CTV News

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VANCOUVER —
An instructor at a Metro Vancouver university says her daughter is stranded in the quarantined Chinese city of Wuhan, and she’s asking the Canadian government to join France and the United States in their efforts to evacuate their citizens from the area.

Lily Liu, who teaches at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, told CTV News Vancouver her daughter Fiona Dong left for China on Jan. 10 to visit her father and grandparents in Wuhan.

She was planning to stay through the Lunar New Year and leave China on Feb. 10, but changed her departing flight to Jan. 27 as the outbreak of a novel coronavirus first identified in Wuhan began to spread, Liu said.

Then, on Wednesday, China cut off all travel into and out of Wuhan, and Dong’s airline cancelled her departing flight, leaving her stranded in the city.

“She is my only daughter,” Liu said. “I’m worried every day. Also, all my family members who are in North America, we are so worried about her.”

She said she has been speaking to Fiona daily since the city was quarantined. She said media reports her daughter has seen in China have suggested the city will be closed “at least eight weeks.”

“The longer she stays there, the more dangerous,” Liu said. “She’s healthy now, but we don’t know, you know, what will happen to her … If she can’t get out now, every day her life is being threatened.”

Liu spent much of Saturday morning on the phone, talking to relatives and trying to get assistance from the Canadian government.

Since cutting off trains, planes and other links to Wuhan, as well as public transportation within the city, China has steadily expanded the lockdown to 16 surrounding cities with a combined population of more than 50 million. That’s a greater total population than that of New York, London, Paris and Moscow combined.

On Friday, France confirmed three cases of the coronavirus within its borders, the first three cases reported in Europe. Cases have also been recorded in the United States, Japan, Australia, Malaysia and elsewhere.

French automaker PSA Group says it will evacuate its employees from Wuhan, quarantine them and then bring them to France. The Foreign Ministry said it was working on “eventual options” to evacuate French citizens from Wuhan “who want to leave.” It didn’t elaborate.

U.S media sources, including CNN, have reported that the United States is working on chartering a flight to get Americans out of the country, but the U.S. State Department had not confirmed those efforts Saturday.

Liu said she hoped Canada would make similar plans, but her calls so far have not been fruitful. She said the Canadian government’s advice to travellers so far has been to follow the instructions of the local government in China.

“I’m so frustrated, because if the government doesn’t take any action to help, for us, personally, we have no way to get out of the city,” she said.

Global Affairs Canada has warned Canadians to avoid all non-essential travel to Hubei Province, where Wuhan is located and the novel coronavirus was first discovered.

CTV News reached out to Global Affairs to ask about what plans, if any, Canada has for evacuating its citizens from affected areas of China, as well as how many Canadians are currently in the country.

In a statement, the federal agency said it is “closely monitoring the situation.”

“GAC is closely working with Public Health Agency of Canada and Health Canada to provide guidance to our diplomats serving abroad and their families for staying healthy and safe,” the agency said.

“Canadians in need of emergency consular assistance can contact the Embassy of Canada in Beijing at 86 (10) 5139-4000,” the statement continued. “Canadians can also call the department’s 24/7 Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa at +1 613-996-8885 or email sos@international.gc.ca.”

Global Affairs Canada said it is aware of multiple Canadians who are currently in Hubei province, but it couldn’t provide a concrete number.

With files from the Associated Press and CNN 

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Canada's first 'presumptive positive' case of coronavirus found in Ontario – CTV News

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TORONTO —
Ontario’s chief medical officer has confirmed Canada’s first ‘presumptive positive’ case of coronavirus.

In a news conference Saturday, officials said the man in his 50s fell ill after travelling to Wuhan, the Chinese city at the heart of the outbreak. The patient is in stable condition at Toronto’s Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.

Officials in Ontario have been in contact with Canada’s public health agency and are working in collaboration with Toronto Public Health to “prevent any spread” of the virus.

Dr. Eileen De Villa, Toronto’s medical officer of health, said officials are focused on finding out who the patient may have come into contact with and what types of settings they may have been exposed to.

“It is understandable that people may be concerned with today’s news of our first case and that people may worry,”” de Villa said in a press release.

“But I assure you that based on the lessons we learned from SARS now 17 years ago, and given our experiences during the flu pandemic of 2009 and more recently, with Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome, we have learned, shared knowledge and built a stronger public health system that is ready to respond, as needed.”

So far, two coronavirus cases have been confirmed in the U.S. Australia and Malaysia reported their first cases of the virus Saturday, while Japan confirmed a third case. France confirmed three cases Friday, the first in Europe.

China’s National Health Commission confirmed Saturday that the death toll from the new virus had climbed to 41, with the number of people infected rising to 1,287.

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