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Grey Cup: Argonauts top Winnipeg Blue Bombers 24-23

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The lead changed hands a few times in a low-scoring affair, as the Toronto Argonauts beat the Winnipeg Blue Bombers 24-23 at the 109th Grey Cup in Regina.

It was a tight, defensive first quarter as the Argos got on the scoreboard first with a field goal from Boris Bede at 10:16.

The Bombers finally scored in the second quarter when a too many menon the field penalty against Toronto led to a third-and-goal situation, and Dakota Prukop punched it into the end zone.

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Bede then kicked a 36-yard field goal with 3:30 left in the second quarter, but the Bombers’ Marc Liegghio answered back with a 45-yard field goal to make the score 10-7 for Winnipeg at halftime.

After a halftime show performance from Canadian country star Josh Ross, Jordan Davis and Tyler Hubbard from Florida Georgia Line, Toronto quickly took the lead. A.J. Ouellette scored at 11:30 of the third quarter, making it 14-10 for the Argos.

Bomber quarterback Zach Collaros put together a strong drive late in the third quarter that led to a second touchdown from Prukop, putting Winnipeg back in the lead, 17-14.

Less than a minute into the fourth quarter, Janarion Grant widened the Bombers’ lead with a 102 yard punt return for a touchdown, making it 23-14 for Winnipeg.

Toronto re-took the lead with 3:40 left in the fourth quarter after backup quarterback Chad Kelly threw to A.J. Ouellette for his second touchdown of the game.

It was a frenzied final few minutes, as the Bombers came within field goal range but had their attempt blocked and the Toronto Argonauts hung on to win, 24-23.

Toronto quarterback McLeod Bethel-Thompson led the game with 203 passing yards, while Blue Bomber running back Brady Oliveira led rushing yards with 77. It’s Toronto’s first Grey Cup win since 2017, when they defeated the Calgary Stampeders.

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James questions media disparity in coverage of Irving tweet, Jerry Jones photo

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — LeBron James has questions about the disparity of media scrutiny he believes is being applied to a 1957 photo of Jerry Jones and the recent controversy surrounding Kyrie Irving.

The photo of Jones, captured by an Associated Press photographer, shows him standing among a group of white students at North Little Rock High School in Arkansas on Sept. 9, 1957. The group was blocking six Black students who were attempting to desegregate the school and news reports said that moments after the image was taken, the students were shoved down a flight of stairs.

The photo accompanied a Washington Post story last month that was about Jones’ legacy as owner of the Dallas Cowboys, including how the team has never had a Black head coach.

James has spoken often about the Cowboys — he was a fan of the team for years before saying in October on Instagram Live that he has switched allegiances — but said Wednesday that he found it interesting that he wasn’t asked about the Jones photo.

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“When I watched Kyrie talk, and he says, ‘I know who I am, but I want to keep the same energy when we’re talking about my people and the things they’ve been through,’ and that Jerry Jones photo is one of those moments that our people, Black people, have been through in America,” James said after the Los Angeles Lakers’ game on Wednesday night. “And I feel like as a Black man, as a Black athlete, someone with power and with a platform, when we do something wrong or something that people don’t agree with, it’s on every single tabloid, every single news coverage. It’s on the bottom ticker. It’s asked about every single day.

“But it seems like to me that the whole Jerry Jones situation, the photo, and I know it was years and years ago, and we all make mistakes, I get it. It seems like it’s just been buried under, like, ‘Oh, it happened. OK. We just move on.’ And I was just kind of disappointed that I haven’t received that question from you guys.”

Irving was suspended for an eventual eight games by the Brooklyn Nets earlier this season after the guard — a former teammate of James’ with the Cleveland Cavaliers — tweeted a link to a film containing antisemitic material.

James was asked by reporters about that last month, and he made clear that he thought Irving made a significant mistake.

“There’s no place in this world for it,” James said in November. “Nobody can benefit from that and I believe what Kyrie did caused some harm to a lot of people. … We as humans, none of us are perfect. But I hope he understands how what he did and the actions that he took were just harmful to a lot of people.”

Jones told reporters last week that he was at that school entrance as “a curious kid.” He was 14 at the time.

“That was, gosh, 65 years ago, and (I was a) curious kid,” Jones said. “I didn’t know at the time the monumental event really that was going on. And I’m sure glad that we’re a long way from that.”

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Oilers Takeaways: Edmonton survives scary finish for third win in a row – Sportsnet.ca

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Canada coach John Herdman disputes Croatian counterpart’s account of skipped post-match handshake

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Canada head coach John Herdman during a World Cup match against Croatia, at the Khalifa International Stadium, in Doha, Qatar, on Nov. 27.The Associated Press

Canada coach John Herdman is disputing his Croatian counterpart’s account of why there was no handshake after their World Cup game.

Herdman had antagonized the Croatian camp with a heated postgame message to his players after Canada’s opening 1-0 loss to Belgium at the soccer showcase. Asked in a pitch-side interview what he had said in a postgame huddle to his players, Herdman replied: “I told them they belong here and we’re going to go and eff – Croatia. That’s as simple as it gets.”

That prompted a stern lecture from Croatia coach Zlatko Dalic on the need for respect. And after Croatia beat the Canadians 4-1 Sunday, Dalic was asked if he had a chance to shake hands with Herdman following the final whistle.

“I did not see the other head coach after the match,” he said through an interpreter. “When I lose I always congratulate the winner. He was not there and that’s his way of doing things. He’s obviously mad. He is a good coach. He is a high-quality professional. But it will take some time for him to learn some things.”

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Herdman, whose postgame news conference preceded Dalic’s on Sunday, disputed that account Wednesday when asked about it.

“Look, we shook hands before the game. So that happened,” he said. “At the end of the game, the usual process – no different than [with Belgium coach] Roberto Martinez. You shake hands with the coach, then you go shake hands with the referee.

“When I turned round, [Dalic] was already off down the touchline, which is his right to do. He’s celebrating. He’s just beaten Canada. It was a big celebration for him. He was off and I couldn’t get to shake his hand. I went into the field, shook the ref’s hand, shook players’ hands. And didn’t get to see him.

“That moment’s gone. We’re into process now – team huddle, see your fans, flash interviews, calm yourself down so you don’t say anything and move on.”

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