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Hands On: Dipping Into Island Life In Animal Crossing: New Horizons – Nintendo Life

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Animal Crossing games don’t come around all that often – at least not mainline games – so it’s hardly an understatement to say that hype surrounding Animal Crossing: New Horizons has been a touch feverish recently. Well, we were lucky enough to get our hands on it for a short time at Nintendo’s UK offices, and the gossip is just too juicy not to share, so strap yourselves in for a time of goodness.

We played three different save files so that we could see the game in various different stages, one when you’ve just started out on your island, one a fair ways down the line, and a final one where even the supremely exciting terraforming systems are unlocked; and yes, we terraformed, baby.

The first thing that hit us is just how pretty the game is. Yes we’ve seen screenshots and video footage in various different areas, but none of that really managed to do it justice. Seeing it in person showed just how sharp the whole game is, despite all the rounded corners on just about everything. Colours pop out at you, details as fine as Timmy and Tommy’s face fur are crisp and refined, the various lighting effects cast a wonderful array of different feels across your character and the surrounding environment, the entire thing is nothing short of drop-dead gorgeous.

This trend also carries over to how the characters behave and move; you’ll see villagers milling around as they usually do, but everyone seems to be living their own lives as well, rather than just waiting for you to interact with them and give their existence some semblance of meaning. Tom Nook can be found reading a book as you walk into Resident Services, Isabelle was diligently dusting her work area, they’re much more real, at least as real as giant anthropomorphic animals can be.

The animations have also had an upgrade, albeit less obviously. Running now carries real weight as your character snaps their arms back and forth rather than doing that strange ‘floaty’ sprint in New Leaf and pole vaulting over rivers feels substantial; it all aids in making your actions feel that much more true-to-life.

But what was most impressive was how in the earliest save file the island felt serene, calm, but properly isolated. You’re not walking in on an existing town and reigning over the occupants as the rightful dictator that you are; you’re hand-crafting this whole area from scratch, right down to the land and waters themselves (eventually). This is your island, your vision, and it’s more flexible than it has ever been before. Crafting is also an interesting addition; we didn’t fully realise just how much we’d need the resources found on the island to get by, so farming wood, stone, metal and other materials looks like it’s certainly going to bulk out your daily endeavours significantly. No more playing the game for an hour and feeling like you’ve done all you can do, yahoo!

Moving further on to the second save file, we started seeing a slightly more ‘traditional’ Animal Crossing layout to some degree. More houses, more villagers, fewer structures made of canvas, but absolutely littered with objects on the outside. This really felt like the island we were playing had a lot more personality to it, a far more personal endeavour than just having the Museum in the top left-hand corner rather than the bottom right.

Oh and the Museum, the Museum. We don’t want to gush about the visuals too much but we can’t let this slide by without a mention. Having perused through the halls we were utterly floored at just how atmospheric, original, and downright real the museum felt. Vents on the walls, small gratings where you might expect them, ants surreptitiously stealing sugar from an unattended cup of coffee; it is without a doubt one of the most wonderful visual experiences we’ve had in a game.

And now we get onto the most exciting reveal of the past Direct, terraforming – we’re not sure if that’s what it’s called in-game, but that’s what we’re calling it and we make the rules around here. We were only able to play around for a short time with all this, but suffice it to say our curiosity has been sufficiently tickled. The whole notion of your choice of town in past games being an unshakeable, unchangeable decision has come crashing down, and we were able to not only build or carve out whatever we wanted, but we could at long last place flooring down without fearing that someone’s going to kick it into dust.

It seems almost too much freedom coming at it afresh, but considering how developed the island was when we were playing, we’re fairly certain you’ll be introduced to the concept slowly and gracefully rather than being dropped into it like we were. The scope is borderline endless, and when combined with the whole fruit-eating to move entire trees about the place, we can only imagine what wondrous creations fans will be crafting.

All in all, Animal Crossing: New Horizons is shaping up to completely and utterly usurp its predecessors. There seems to be almost no reason we can think of why we’d return to the other games once we own this proper, it’s improved upon every single aspect from past titles, and thrown in a whole host of new lovely little quality of life features to boot. If when it comes out it can hold our attention even half as well as it managed to in our short time playing it, we’re all going to be in for a treat like no other.

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tvOS 15.5, watchOS 8.6, and HomePod Software 15.5 now available to the public – 9to5Mac

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Following the release of iOS 15.5 and macOS Monterey 12.4 to all users, Apple on Monday also made tvOS 15.5, watchOS 8.6, and HomePod Software 15.5 available to the public. The updates bring overall improvements with no major changes.

tvOS 15.5

Apple doesn’t specify what has changed with tvOS 15.5, so we assume that the update just fixes some bugs and improves the performance of the operating system for Apple TV users.

The update is now available for Apple TV HD (4th generation) and later users. You can install the latest version of tvOS by going to Settings > System > Software Update.

watchOS 8.6

As for watchOS 8.6, the update enables the ECG app and irregular rhythm notifications for Apple Watch users in Mexico. With the ECG app, users can take an electrocardiogram directly from their wrist.

According to the release notes, the update also includes “improvements and bug fixes.”

watchOS 8.6 is available for Apple Watch Series 3 and later, and you can download the update by going to the Watch app on your iPhone.

HomePod Software 15.5

Just like tvOS 15.5, it’s unclear what’s new in HomePod Software 15.5, as Apple says that the update comes with “general performance and stability improvements.”

Users can update their HomePods through the Home app on an iOS device.

Check out 9to5Mac on YouTube for more Apple news:

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With GitHub, Canadian company TELUS aims to bring 'focus, flow and joy' to developers – Transform – Microsoft

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Katie Peters could have used an advocate as she embarked on her tech career.

In her first year at the University of British Columbia, Peters’ computer science classes were split almost evenly along gender lines. But most of her female classmates soon switched majors, and by Peters’ final year there were typically only two or three women in those classes. She felt increasingly isolated and was uncomfortable asking for help.

After graduating with a computer science degree in 2012, Peters took a job as a software developer for TELUS, a Canadian telecommunications company. Joining an organization with more than 90,000 employees, Peters initially found it challenging to make her way around its procedures and structure. So when the position of staff developer opened on TELUS’ new engineering productivity team last fall, Peters jumped at the opportunity.

“I wanted to be the person that I wish could have helped me,” says Peters, who started in the role last October. “There are so many complicated processes in a company as large as TELUS and it’s really difficult to navigate. You end up feeling stupid a lot of the time and you have to ask lots of questions. I don’t want other people to have to experience that. I want to make that better.”

Peters is ‘a brilliant developer and a brilliant technologist,’ says Justin Watts, head of TELUS’ engineering productivity team.

Peters is now helping lead an initiative aimed at changing TELUS’ culture to better empower its developers. Much of that effort is focused on encouraging widespread adoption of Microsoft’s code-hosting platform GitHub to help automate software development at TELUS and make it easier for the company’s roughly 4,000 developers to collaborate. TELUS recently made GitHub available companywide and signed an agreement with Microsoft to help manage its enterprise-level use of the platform and provide GitHub training to developers.

Justin Watts, head of developer experience for TELUS, says Peters’ experience as both a developer and a previous member of TELUS’ enterprise architecture team makes her ideally suited to help redefine the company’s approach to software development.

“This is all being driven by Katie and the vision she has,” says Watts, who heads the engineering productivity team. “Katie is great at capturing that relationship with the developer and what our goals are. She is a brilliant developer and a brilliant technologist.

“She’s seen as a really senior, influential mind in the company.”

Justin Watts, head of the engineering productivity team at TELUS.
Justin Watts.

Peters is already shaking things up. Drawing inspiration from “The Unicorn Project,” a 2019 novel by Gene Kim about a group of renegade developers seeking to overthrow the existing order and make work more fulfilling, Peters has replaced the usual staid presentation decks with ones featuring swirling designs, pink and purple tones and cartoon unicorns, and adopted the book’s mantra of bringing “focus, flow and joy” to developers.

Transform recently chatted with Peters over Microsoft Teams from her home in Vancouver, where she lives with her husband and 2-year-old daughter. The interview has been condensed for clarity and length.

TRANSFORM: Why was the engineering productivity team formed and what is its mission?

PETERS: We’ve been transitioning to the cloud for software development for a while, but it’s challenging. It greatly simplifies very complicated operations activities and turns those things into code. So instead of needing an ops professional to manually create a bespoke server for the developer to host their application, the definition of that server is standardized and codified in a way that can be stored and managed alongside the application code.

That makes it easier for a developer to manage it themselves, but they’re now expected to own that server definition, where sometimes they’ve never previously had exposure to the ops side of software development. That’s a really difficult transition for people. And a lot of legacy processes haven’t caught up to cloud development yet. We’re giving developers a lot more freedom, but it’s also a lot more responsibility in different areas than they might not have had experience in before. So we have to make that not a burden for them.

Our team exists to help developers make that cloud transition and to update all of that legacy process baggage to align with the new cloud paradigm.

TRANSFORM: Why did TELUS see a need to change how software development is done?

PETERS: We need to stay innovative and creative. We need to be able to react quickly to the market, and if we want to be able to do that, we need to give developers the time and the space and the safety to do that while also making sure that what they’re building is secure and reliable.

Streetscape photo showing the exterior of TELUS' headquarters in Vancouver, B.C.
TELUS’ headquarters in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia.

To enable us to move quickly without sacrificing security and reliability, we need to really make that developer experience our focus. I treat it as the developers are my customers, and what experiences can I give them so that they are inspired to keep pushing and keep innovating, and just unblock them as much as I can, to make it as simple and fast as I can so that they can keep innovating.

TRANSFORM: What role can GitHub play in helping developers shift to this new cloud paradigm?

PETERS: GitHub used to be just for storing the source code, but now it has a lot of other features. When you’re writing code, for example, you need to be able to plan that work and distribute it to people. We can use GitHub projects for that.

After you’ve developed code, there are tools you can use to tell you if there are problems with how you’ve written it. In the past, we would wait until we were trying to release that code to our customers before we would run those tests. So when things went wrong, it was really costly. Now, developers can push their code back to the public repository on GitHub for the rest of the team to see. Then we can run all of these automated tests and security scans, so it’s easier to make fixes right then, whereas in the old world, it was potentially months later they would get that feedback.

With GitHub taking over that developer lifecycle, that allows us to build in a lot of automation so we have end-to-end visibility on where developers are spending their time and what they’re doing. That’s good for metrics on how we can improve that experience and make it better for people.

TRANSFORM: GitHub is ultimately a tool. What other components are you thinking about in driving this cultural shift at TELUS?

PETERS: As a big company, TELUS can be a little formal. It’s hard for people to ask for help. We really wanted to change that culture. We wanted to be open and approachable and let people vent to us in a psychologically safe place to share their problems. That way, we can understand all the little things that add up to so much toil.

Photo of Katie Peters working at a computer in TELUS' headquarters and showing a slide with a unicorn from one of her signature presentation decks.
Peters draws inspiration from ‘The Unicorn Project,’ a novel about a group of renegade developers.

We have a lot of really creative people at TELUS, a lot of talented developers, and they come up with really interesting ways to deal with the status quo that don’t actually fix the problem for anyone else — it’s just a workaround that they’ve developed. We need people to feel safe coming to us with their problems and trust that we can help them solve them, so that we can then bring that to everybody and drive that improvement across the board.

TRANSFORM: How did your interest in computers start?

PETERS: My parents really wanted me to be interested in computers, so they bought me my own computer when I was a kid. They got me into robot building camps and software development camps and all sorts of stuff.

I started playing video games when I was 4 years old. I played Putt-Putt Goes to the Moon and Fatty Bear’s Birthday Surprise. I loved all sorts of video games. Morrowind was another big game for me. They had a modding community, and I learned a lot about computers in general by participating in that community. (Modding refers to the practice of altering content or creating new content for video games.)

I wanted to work in the video game industry, but when I was applying for co-op placements during university, I got into Sierra Wireless (a Canadian IoT solutions provider). As I was exposed to that industry, I liked the consistency and stability of the telco industry and the feeling that you’re contributing to something important. Providing internet to people is really important.

TRANSFORM: You said you felt at times like you have imposter syndrome. Did you feel that way particularly as a female developer?

PETERS: I’ve always had a lot of imposter syndrome, which I think is true for a lot of software developers. I’m not unique in that way. I do think it’s worse as a woman, but I think it’s just common in software development to have those kinds of feelings. The industry is kind of steeped in this mythology of like, really smart geeks who live and breathe computer science and build Google or Microsoft in their basement, and they’re all geniuses and always know everything about everything.

Photo taken at TELUS headquarters in Vancouver, B.C., showing two interior offices with chairs grouped around tables and views out windows.
TELUS, which employs around 4,000 developers, is using GitHub to transform its approach to software development.

There are really high expectations in the software industry in general, and I think everybody experiences that, but I think it’s amplified for a woman. Because the expectation, I think, at least when I started in the industry, was that I don’t actually know what I’m doing. I’m a poseur and I just got my place because I’m a woman. So I had to work really hard to appear extra smart. 

TRANSFORM: Is it important to you, as a woman in this role, to attract more female developers to the field? 

PETERS: Absolutely. When you’re the only woman, it can be really challenging. And when you have one or two women in a large group, sometimes you can be forced into this weird sense of competition with them. People are always comparing you to the other women.

But when there’s a critical mass of women, you really get to be comfortable working with other women who typically come from the same kinds of experiences. You get to open up a little bit in a way that you might not have been able to otherwise. Most women I encounter in computer science are so supportive and friendly.

It always makes me happy to see more women in the industry. Any opportunity I have to try to make that easier for somebody or to help somebody go in that direction, I’m very happy to be able to do that.

Top photo: Katie Peters stands on a deck at TELUS’ headquarters in Vancouver, B.C. (Justin Watts photo courtesy of Justin Watts; all other photos by Jennifer Gauthier)

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Apple is making it easier to distribute subscription podcasts – The Verge

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Apple is making it easier for podcasters to get their subscription shows onto its platform. Creators on select podcast distribution platforms like Acast and Libsyn will soon be able to automatically upload their premium shows onto the Apple Podcasts app instead of having to publish it episode by episode through Apple’s platform.

Currently, those who offer subscription shows through the Apple Podcasters Program need to publish episodes through Apple Podcast Connect. The company says that its new Delegated Delivery system will allow creators to skip that extra step and publish shows on Apple directly from their host’s dashboard. In addition to Acast and Libsyn, the initial group of partner hosts includes Buzzsprout, Omny Studio, RSS.com, Blubrry, and ART19. The feature is supposed to launch “this fall.”

The new distribution feature will also apply to free shows, which are distributed by RSS feed. Even with the new distribution system, podcasters offering subscriptions will still need to pay for the Apple Podcasters Program, which costs $19.99 per year.

Apple Podcasts spokesperson Zach Kahn said that the new feature is not intended to compete with Spotify’s Anchor, which allows creators to host and distribute subscription shows directly onto Spotify. The intent, he said, is to create a more open podcasting ecosystem so open that Anchor and Megaphone, also owned by Spotify, could become Delegated Delivery partners if the company chose to do so. Spotify did not respond to request for comment on whether it would.

Spotify already has its own partner hosts that have streamlined publishing for subscription shows through its Open Access program, including Supercast, glow.fm (which is owned by Libsyn), and Apple partner Acast. (Note: Vox Media is also a partner in Spotify’s Open Access program).

Apple announced a new feature for podcast listeners as well. A new software update for iPhones, iPads, and Macs will allow users to specify how many podcast episodes they want to keep downloaded in the app for offline listening, with options like “five latest episodes” or those published in the “last 14 days.” Older episodes that weren’t manually downloaded will be automatically removed. The new downloads configuration potentially solves a big annoyance for heavy podcast listeners who can quickly rack up downloads that eat their device’s storage.

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