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'It's going to get much uglier': The US is not prepared for the next phase of COVID-19 vaccinations – Yahoo Movies Canada

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The Canadian Press

Floyd Little, Syracuse and Broncos great, dies at 78

Floyd Little, the running back who starred at Syracuse and for the Denver Broncos, has died. He was 78.The Pro Football Hall of Fame said he died Friday night at his home in Nevada. No cause was given.“Floyd Little was not only a Hall of Fame running back, he was a Hall of Fame person,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said. “Faith, family and football were the pillars of his life.”Little was a three-time All-American at Syracuse, where he wore No. 44 like Jim Brown and Ernie Davis before him. From 1964-66, he ran for 2,704 yards and 46 touchdowns.Little was the sixth overall pick in the 1967 AFL-NFL draft. He played nine seasons in Denver, where he earned the nickname “The Franchise” because his signing was credited with keeping the team from relocating and helped persuade voters to approve funds for the old, iconic Mile High Stadium, which has since been replaced by Empower Field at Mile High.“I know when I got there the talk was about the team moving to Chicago or Birmingham,” Little told The Associated Press in an interview in 2009. “So, I supposedly saved the franchise, and I think (former team spokesman) Jim Saccomano gave me that nickname. It’s been a part of my name ever since.”Little was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2010.“Floyd Little was a true hero of the game,” said David Baker, president and CEO of the pro hall. “He was a man of great integrity, passion and courage. His contributions off the field were even greater than his amazing accomplishments he did on it. Floyd’s smile, heart and character epitomized what it meant to have a Hall of Fame life.”A high school star in Connecticut at New Haven’s Hillhouse High, Little overlapped at Syracuse with U.S. President-elect Joe Biden, who said in a statement Saturday the pair had become friends and often spoke by phone after Orange football games.“He was full of character, decency, and integrity,” Biden said. “He was always gracious with his time with fans — parents and grandparents who wanted to introduce their children and grandchildren to a genuine role model.”A five-time Pro Bowler, Little led the NFL in rushing in 1971 with 1,133 yards and in touchdown runs in 1973 with 12. He also was one of the league’s best kick returners, leading the AFL in punt returns as a rookie in 1967.During his nine-year pro career, Little rushed for 6,323 yards and 43 touchdowns and caught 215 passes for 2,418 yards and nine TDs. He had the most all-purpose yards in pro football and ranked second only to O.J. Simpson in yards rushing over his career.After a three-decade wait, Little made it into Canton in 2010. He told the AP when he was nominated by the hall’s senior committee that he had given up hope of ever making it into the Hall of Fame.“I was running out of guys who had seen me play,” said Little, whose career in Denver spanned the years 1967-75, lean times in the former AFL franchise’s history. “The people that had seen me play were starting to fade off and retire. All these guys were no longer there, so who’s going to talk about Floyd Little? Nobody. I thought I’d just fallen through the cracks never to be seen or heard from again.”He was never forgotten in Denver, where the late team owner Pat Bowlen once hailed Little’s “immeasurable contributions to this franchise and the NFL.”Little was a vibrant presence at Broncos reunions and events over the years.During his long wait for enshrinement, Little said he was regularly approached by fans wanting him to settle a bet: Which year did he go into the Hall of Fame?“And I have to tell them I’m not in the Hall of Fame and I’ve never even been nominated,” Little said in the months before his selection on Feb. 6, 2010.Little decided not to get his hopes up anymore and a few years later, the senior committee nominated him, allowing him to dream anew about football immortality. On the eve of his selection, he said he’d had a premonition that his time was coming at last.“It’s the 44th Super Bowl,” Little said in 2010. “An African-American just became our 44th president. I wore No. 44. I just feel it’s my time.”He was right: Hall Vice-President Joe Horrigan called him with the good news the day before New Orleans’ 31-17 win over Indianapolis in the Super Bowl.“I was numb,” Little said. “I knew he wasn’t calling to tell me I was passed over again.”Little said he learned a valuable lesson that day: “Well, you don’t give up on your dreams,” even if it’s to assuage the pain of envisioned rejection.Little, who had sold his car dealership in Seattle after 32 years not long before his nomination, returned to Syracuse the following year as a special assistant to the athletic director, a position he held until 2016, when he received an honorary doctorate degree from the university.After that, Little and his wife moved to Las Vegas.An ex-teammate of Little’s at Syracuse, Pat Killorin, made Little’s cancer diagnosis public in May when he created a GoFundMe page to help the family with treatment costs.Floyd is survived by his wife, Deborah.___Follow Arnie Melendrez Stapleton on Twitter: http://twitter.com/arniestapleton___More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFLArnie Stapleton, The Associated Press

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Quebec reports 2,225 new COVID-19 cases, 67 deaths as hospitalizations decline – The Record (New Westminster)

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MONTREAL — Quebec is reporting 2,225 new COVID-19 cases and 67 further deaths attributed to the novel coronavirus. 

The number of hospitalizations dropped for a second day, this time by 22 for a total of 1,474 patients, with four fewer patients in intensive care for a total of 227.

Health Minister Christian Dube tweeted that all Quebecers need to continue to follow public health rules to ensure cases and hospitalizations go down.

The province’s Health Department reported 2,430 more recoveries, for a total of 210,364.

Quebec currently has 21,640 active cases.

The province has now reported 240,970 confirmed infections and 9,005 deaths since the beginning of the pandemic.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 16, 2021.

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2 COVID-19 deaths in Manitoba as province announces 180 more cases – CBC.ca

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There are 180 new COVID-19 cases in Manitoba on Saturday and two more people have died from the illness, the province says in a news release.

The latest deaths are two men: one in his 70s from the Southern Health region and one in his 80s from the Winnipeg health region, the release says.

Just under half the new cases on Saturday — 83 — are in the Winnipeg health region, the release says. There are also 69 new cases in the Northern Health Region, which has seen a sharp uptick in cases this week due to outbreaks in several communities, health officials have said.

A COVID-19 outbreak has been declared at the Lynn Lake Hospital, the release says, while an outbreak previously declared in Winnipeg’s Seven Oaks General Hospital’s 4U4-7 unit is now over.

Lynn Lake, a small northwestern Manitoba town of fewer than 500 people, was already dealing with an outbreak of its own. As of Wednesday, the community had 121 known active cases of the illness.

The health district that includes Lynn Lake now has a total of 145 active cases, according to the province’s data portal.

The remaining new cases are spread out between the Southern and Interlake-Eastern health regions (with 10 each) and the Prairie Mountain Health region (with eight).

The update comes one day after the provincial government asked people for their input on the possibility of lifting some pandemic restrictions next week.

Manitoba’s current public health orders banning most gatherings and the sale of non-essential goods are set to expire on Friday.

Because of a data error, one previously reported death has been removed from Manitoba’s totals, the release says. That brings the province’s COVID-19 death toll to 761.

Manitoba’s five-day test positivity rate increased slightly to 10.2 per cent, up from 10 on Friday. In Winnipeg, that rate dropped from 7.2 per cent on Friday to seven per cent.

There are now 283 COVID-19 patients hospitalized in Manitoba — down by one from Friday — including 36 who are in intensive care, one more than Friday.

The province reminded people to check restrictions in other regions before they go anywhere if they have to travel. In Ontario, new public health rules say people can only go to another residence or cottage in the province for less than 24 hours to do essential business, the release says. If they stay any longer, they may have to stay and self-isolate for 14 days.

There have now been 27,322 COVID-19 cases identified in Manitoba. To date, 23,575 are considered recovered, while another 2,986 are still listed as active — though health officials have recently said that number is inflated by a data entry backlog, and there are likely only about half as many active cases.

There were 2,043 COVID-19 tests done in Manitoba on Friday, which brings the total number completed in the province to 450,104.

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Canada says first COVID-19 vaccine for refugees in Jordan offers glimmer of hope – Powell River Peak

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OTTAWA — Canada’s international development minister says the world’s first inoculation of a refugee against COVID-19 this week is an important milestone in ending the pandemic everywhere.

Karina Gould told The Canadian Press in a statement that it was encouraging to see the rollout of new vaccinations because “it brings an early glimmer of hope to the most vulnerable people right across the globe as we fight this terrible pandemic.”

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A woman living in the northern Jordanian city of Irbid who had fled northern Iraq became the first United Nations registered refugee to receive the COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday.

Before the pandemic, Canada committed $2.1 billion in security, humanitarian and development funds to help Jordan and neighbouring Lebanon cope with the massive influx of refugees they face due to the crises in Syria and Iraq.

Since the pandemic began, Canada has committed more than $865 million to the ACT-Accelerator, a global effort to ensure low- and middle-income countries have equitable access to medical treatments during the pandemic. It has also committed $220 million to its partner initiative, the COVAX Facility, to help buy vaccine doses for low- and middle-income countries.

“While we’re fighting for the health of our own citizens, I am committed to ensure we’re not leaving the rest of the world behind,” said Gould, who was appointed Friday as the co-chair of the COVAX international engagement group.

The appointment will see Gould working with the Indonesian foreign minister, the Ethiopian health minister and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, which has emerged in the last two decades as the major distributor of vaccines to poor countries.

“Canada has invested $865 million into global health efforts against COVID-19 and continues to make equitable access to a vaccine and health solutions to the pandemic a reality for all, including refugees living in precarious conditions,” said Gould.

In an updated mandate letter released Friday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told Gould to work with new Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau and other cabinet colleagues to “reinforce international efforts to ensure that people around the world have access to health interventions to fight COVID-19, including vaccines, therapeutics and strengthened health systems.”

Rema Jamous Imseis, the Canadian representative for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, said if refugees aren’t vaccinated, they run the risk of infecting people in their host countries.

“If you want to defeat the pandemic, you have to include refugees in the vaccine rollout around the world,” she said.

“That’s sort of the bigger context and what we’re doing is calling on all governments, Canada included, to ensure that refugees and other displaced populations are included.”

Jordan is also the home to the Zaatari refugee camp, one of the world’s largest, less than 15 kilometres from the Syrian border. It is home to almost 80,000 people, including more than 40,000 children, fleeing the carnage of Syria’s decade-long civil war and the unrest sparked by Islamic militants in Iraq.

Canada has deployed hundreds of military personnel to northern Iraq and neighbouring Kuwait as part of a Western effort to fight the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. Canada supplies the commander of the NATO training mission in northern Iraq that is trying to professionalize Iraqi security forces to protect its own citizens from ISIL.

“COVID has essentially been an emergency on top of an emergency for refugees around the world,” said Jamous Imseis.

“Canada came out early and strong as one of the donors to the COVAX initiative,” she added.

“But we also need Canada to use its influence with his friends and other countries around the world to ensure that that basic principle of equitable and global access to vaccines for everyone is something that we’re all working towards.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 15, 2021.

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