LifeLabs hack: What Canadians need to know about the health data breach - Global News - Canada News Media
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LifeLabs hack: What Canadians need to know about the health data breach – Global News

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A data breach at LifeLabs, potentially affecting up to 15 million Canadians, was revealed Tuesday.

The company, which performs medical lab tests, apologized for the security breach in a statement, adding that it was first discovered several weeks ago.


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LifeLabs reveals data breach, possibly affecting up to 15 million Canadians

The CEO of the company, Charles Brown, called the incident a wake-up call for the industry.

“Whether you’re a private company, a government, a hospital, we’re all seeing these attacks rise and there’s more and more of them and we’ve collectively got to do more to make sure all our customers feel secure,” he said in a letter to customers.

Here’s what you need to know.






2:03
LifeLabs hack exposes personal data of patients


LifeLabs hack exposes personal data of patients

What information was compromised?

Information that was compromised included health card numbers, names, email addresses, login, passwords and dates of birth. However, LifeLabs said it wasn’t sure how many of the files were accessed during the breach.

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It added the hackers did obtain test results from as many as 85,000 Ontario residents, dated 2016 and earlier.

The company said it hired cybersecurity experts to secure the system and determine the scope of the attack, and paid an undisclosed amount of money as ransom to secure the information.

How serious is the hack?

Ann Cavoukian, the former privacy commissioner for Ontario and executive director and founder of Privacy by Design, told Global News Radio that the “most sensitive of information” was compromised in the hack.

“You would think that a company that is entrusted with so much of that information would have the strongest security measures imaginable,” she said. “Clearly, they didn’t.”

Cavoukian said an investigation into the hack, currently being conducted by the Ontario and B.C. privacy commissioners, will evaluate how something like this could have happened — and why the company took weeks to reveal it.

In his letter, Brown said system issues related to the breach have been fixed and Tuesday’s announcement is “in the interest of transparency.”

What can you do?

Cavoukian added that there’s not much those affected by the data breach can really do at this point. For starters, she said those who are unsure whether their data was affected should contact LifeLabs. They can also take steps such as changing their passwords.

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While the company is still determining exactly how many people were affected, it said the majority are from Ontario and B.C. It also said it would contact Ontario customers whose test results were accessed.

The company has set up a phone line specifically to handle related inquiries.

LifeLabs also said Tuesday that customers concerned about the safety of their data will be able to receive “one free year of protection that includes dark web monitoring and identity theft insurance.”






2:23
How to protect yourself from a data breach


How to protect yourself from a data breach

Why was a ransom paid?

Brown said in the release that the decision to pay a ransom was not easy, but he felt the responsibility to do everything possible to retrieve data.

“We wanted to get the data back,” he said. “We thought it was the smart thing to do because it was just in the best interests of our customers.”

Paying ransom is a fairly common business decision that can have some negative consequences, according to David Masson, director of enterprise security for cybersecurity firm Darktrace.


READ MORE:
More than 28 million Canadians impacted by a data breach in past 12 months, privacy watchdog says

“If you pay, you’re telling the threat actors that you will pay. You’re quite likely to get hacked again or they’ll tell other threat actors that these people pay. So you could put yourself in a whole world of pain,” he said.

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It also implies that the company has no other option to get the data back and doesn’t guarantee that all will be returned. Masson also believes the data never left the LifeLabs system but was encrypted.

— With files from The Canadian Press

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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‘Pharma Bro’ Martin Shkreli sued over drug price monopoly ‘scheme’ – Global News

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State and federal authorities sued imprisoned entrepreneur Martin Shkreli on Monday over tactics that shielded a profitable drug from competition after a price hike made the so-called “Pharma Bro” infamous.

Shkreli was scorned as the bad-boy face of pharmaceuticals profiteering after he engineered a roughly 4,000 per cent increase in the price of a decades-old medication for a sometimes life-threatening parasitic infection.

Monday’s lawsuit, filed by the New York attorney general’s office and the Federal Trade Commission, centres on subsequent actions by Shkreli and his former company.


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‘Pharma bro’ Martin Shkreli put in solitary confinement after allegedly using contraband smartphone

They “held this critical drug hostage from patients and competitors as they illegally sought to maintain their monopoly,” Attorney General Letitia James said in a statement.

At least four potential competitors have so far been kept from making cheaper generic versions of the medication, the suit says.

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‘Pharma Bro’ moved to low-security New Jersey prison with pool tables, music room

Lawyer Benjamin Brafman said Shkreli “looks forward to defeating this baseless and unprecedented attempt by the FTC to sue an individual for monopolizing a market.”

Shkreli, 36, is serving a seven-year prison sentence for a securities-fraud conviction related to hedge funds he ran before getting into the pharmaceuticals industry.






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‘Pharma Bro’ Martin Shkreli gets seven years for defrauding investors


‘Pharma Bro’ Martin Shkreli gets seven years for defrauding investors

Shkreli was CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals — later called Vyera Pharmaceuticals LLC and Phoenixus AG — in 2015, when it acquired the rights to a drug called Daraprim. It is used to treat toxoplasmosis, an infection that can be deadly for people with HIV or other immune-system problems and can cause serious problems for children born to women infected while pregnant. Hospitalized patients typically take the drug daily for several weeks, and sometimes for months or even years, according to the lawsuit.

The company boosted the cost from less than US$20 to US$750 per pill.

“Should be a very handsome investment for all of us,” Shkreli put it in an email to a contact at the time.


READ MORE:
‘Pharma Bro’ Martin Shkreli may sacrifice prized Wu-Tang Clan album to pay off $7.36 million federal bill

The increase left some patients facing co-pays as high as US$16,000 and sparked an outcry that fueled congressional hearings.

Then the company “kept the price of Daraprim astronomically high by illegally boxing out the competition,” FTC official Gail Levine said in a statement Monday.

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The drug’s patent protection had expired, but the company used what’s known as a “closed distribution system” to restrict who could buy it — meaning that companies interested in making a generic version of Daraprim couldn’t get enough pills to do required testing, according to the lawsuit. Many passages are redacted; the AG’s office explained that its investigation may have involved competitive corporate information.






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Martin Shkreli’s lawyer speaks to media following 7-year-sentence handed down to his client


Martin Shkreli’s lawyer speaks to media following 7-year-sentence handed down to his client

The drug had previously been available from various wholesalers and distributors, but it was moved to closed distribution a few months before Turing bought the rights to it.

The lawsuit also accuses the company of manoeuvring to cut off potential rivals’ access to suppliers of a key ingredient for the medication and to data they would want to evaluate the drug’s market potential.

The “elaborate scheme to prevent generic competition” has likely cost consumers and other drug buyers tens of millions of dollars, the suit says.

To date, there is no generic version of Daraprim on the U.S. market.






3:00
Students in Sydney recreate drug Martin Shkreli hiked for fraction of price


Students in Sydney recreate drug Martin Shkreli hiked for fraction of price

The suit also names the company’s current chairman, Kevin Mulleady. Messages were left at a possible phone number for him and sent to an email address possibly associated with him.

The suit seeks unspecified financial relief and penalties, plus an order barring Shkreli and Mulleady from ever owning or working for any pharmaceutical company.

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“We won’t allow `Pharma Bros’ to manipulate the market and line their pockets at the expense of vulnerable patients and the health care system,” said James, a Democrat.

Shkreli raised eyebrows with his behaviour both in business and elsewhere. He bought a one-of-a-kind, unreleased Wu-Tang Clan album for US$2 million, called members of Congress “imbeciles,” taunted prosecutors in the securities-fraud case against him, got kicked off of Twitter for harassing a female journalist and spent countless hours livestreaming himself from his apartment.


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‘Pharma bro’ Martin Shkreli convicted of securities fraud

While awaiting sentencing on his 2017 conviction, he offered his online followers a US$5,000 bounty for a lock of former Democratic presidential nominee and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s hair. His lawyers said it was a joke, but a judge revoked Shkreli’s bail and jailed him.

At his 2018 sentencing, Shkreli choked up, admitted making many mistakes and said he’d evolved.

“There is no conspiracy to take down Martin Shkreli,” he said. “I took down Martin Shkreli.”

© 2020 The Canadian Press

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Addictions experts say 24-hour slot machines in Alberta is a terrible idea – Calgary Herald

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The renovated Starlight Casino in West Edmonton Mall incorporates natural light at some of the slot machine stations. The casino will have its grand opening on September 26, 2018.


Larry Wong / POSTMEDIA

Gaming addiction experts say a recent decision by Alberta Gaming Liquor and Cannabis (AGLC) to allow casinos to run 24-hour slot machines is “the wrong direction” for those struggling with gambling addictions in the province.

AGLC spokeswoman Heather Holmen said Friday that casinos will be able to apply to expand their hours to allow for the operation of slot machines 24 hours per day, following recent regulation changes by the agency.

“We heard from numerous casino operators who asked AGLC to approve this option to support their business,” said Holmen in an email to Postmedia, noting the change is fully optional and there is no timeline for when it will be implemented.

Currently, slots can operate between 10 a.m. and 3 a.m. Holmen said there are a handful of casinos open 24 hours a day for 24-hour poker in the province, and liquor sales regulations will continue to permit sales between 10 a.m. and 2 a.m. and consumption until 3 a.m.


U of C professor David Hodgins is beginning a study of online treatments for gambling addictions, in Calgary on January 3, 2013.

Christina Ryan, Calgary Herald CALGARY, AB.:JANUARY 3, 2013 —

But an expert in the psychology of gambling addictions says closure hours for slots are an important way to break the cycle of gambling when someone is “in the zone” and their control over their play is impaired.

“People really get quite immersed while they’re playing,” said David Hodgins, a psychology professor at the University of Calgary. “To move in the direction of making (slots) 24-hours is really going in the opposite direction than we would recommend in terms of minimizing the potential harms.”

Hodgins said the move is particularly concerning because slots “tend to be the most problematic” form of gambling because they are easily accessible, start with small wins or losses, and give nearly instant results.

“We know that making gambling more accessible means more people will get into problems,” he said.

Ray Reshke, executive director of the Problem Gambling Resources Network (PGRN), expressed concern the move could open the door for further expansion of gambling hours in other areas.

“Casinos will see this as a precedent,” he said in an interview Friday, calling slots the “crack cocaine of gambling.”

“People are going to gamble, but at some point, when do you shut down that opportunity to gamble?” Reshke said, adding the PGRN had not been aware of the change.

“AGLC is committed to finding ways to support player wellness while providing Albertans with gaming entertainment options,” said Holmen.

mwyton@postmedia.com

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‘We just need to get on with it’: Surrey councillor puts ride-hailing on agenda – CityNews Vancouver

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SURREY (NEWS 1130) — The controversy over ride-hailing in the city of Surrey went unaddressed in council chambers Monday but one councillor plans to confront the issue at the next meeting.

Coun. Linda Annis says she hopes Surrey residents will be able to book an Uber or Lyft in the city soon after her motion comes to council on Feb. 10.

“The whole purpose of my notice of motion was to get the city to deal with ride-hailing sooner as opposed to later. The residents of Surrey have been waiting for ride-hailing for quite some time now. Quite honestly, I’m embarrassed by the fact that Vancouver is ready to go and Surrey is not,” she says.

Uber and Lyft were approved to operate on the Lower Mainland Thursday and the city of Vancouver approved business licenses the same day. Drivers hit the road Friday morning.

Annis says she will be asking city staff to move forward with work on regional licensing — allowing ride-hailing operators to operate across Metro Vancouver — which is the approach approved by all Metro Vancouver mayors except Surrey’s. She will also be asking for staff to look at how it can be made easier for Surrey taxi drivers to cross municipal boundaries.

“We should have ride-sharing in Surrey now. We shouldn’t be delaying it. People have been waiting for it and asking for it for a long period of time. I’m not hearing any negativity about it. We just need to get on with it and make it happen now.”

Mayor Doug McCallum has been steadfast in his opposition to ride-hailing, saying operators have an unfair advantage over taxi drivers. Over the weekend, city bylaw officers issued warnings to drivers picking up in the city. In a news conference Monday he reiterated his promise to start issuing $500 fines to Uber drivers in the city and to continue to fine the company $500 per day.

“The mayor has to take a sober second thought. We were elected by the residents of Surrey. The residents of Surrey are asking for ride-hailing. We need to not represent special interest groups we need to move on with it and let the market dictate what sorts of services the residents will use,” Annis says.

“This is a provincial decision around ride-hailing. the mayor can protest as he wishes but in the end of the day Surrey must comply with the provincial legislation and allow ride-hailing in Surrey.”

RELATED: Surrey mayor promises $500 fines for Uber drivers picking up in city

A statement released by B.C.’s Minister of Transportation Monday says municipalities can set requirements for business licences for ride-hailing companies, but can’t stop their operations.

“Provincial law is clear, no municipality has the authority to block the operation of ride-hailing services,” it reads. “The absence of a bylaw or business licence in specific municipalities related to ride-hailing is not grounds for refusal of the service.”

Annis says when she travels to other cities she uses ride-hailing, and argues people need more options.

“Transportation in Surrey is very difficult. We don’t have enough taxis, we don’t have enough buses. Quite frankly, we need to have all options available to us and I think ride-hailing is an absolutely perfect one to ensure that our residents remain safe.”

With files from Martin MacMahon

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