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Manitoba seeking nurses, health-care aides, contact tracers in fight against COVID-19 – CBC.ca

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Manitoba is appealing to the public for help filling a number of nursing and health care aide jobs to assist in the fight against COVID-19.

People from all health-care disciplines are asked to apply, including current and former nurses, and people with comparable training, said Shared Health’s Chief Nursing Officer Lanette Siragusa in a news release on Monday.

“These are unprecedented times and we are appealing to everyone who has chosen a career in caring to consider how they can help,” she said.

“Right now, some of Manitoba’s most vulnerable citizens need our help. Whether you are a student just starting your career, are already working in our health system or are looking to step back into patient care after some time away, we have a role for you.”

Jobs are available for people with varied levels of training and experience, including health care students, new graduates as well as current and former health care workers, Siragusa said.

Although there is a need for nurses and health care aides in personal care homes, there are also positions in areas like contact tracing, call centres and testing sites.

Staff are provided with personal protective equipment, training and support. Every precaution is taken to ensure their safety, according to the release.

People with health-care education, as well as those with comparable training including dietitians, spiritual health providers, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, social workers and others are invited to apply.

“Across the province, compassionate and caring individuals have stepped up to ensure we are able to continue offering the services and support needed by those most vulnerable in our community, but we need additional help in a variety of direct care and behind-the-scenes areas,” Siragusa said.

This comes after Manitoba New Democratic Party (NDP) Leader Wab Kinew shared health-care vacancy numbers in western Manitoba during question period Thursday.

The NDP obtained information from Prairie Mountain Health last week showing that 22 per cent of licensed practical nurse positions were open as of August, as well 19 per cent of registered nursing positions and 16 per cent of nurse practitioners jobs.

In addition, 15 per cent of home-care aide and health-care aide positions were sitting vacant.

Meanwhile, the Manitoba Nurses Union (MNU) says nurses are working well below baseline staffing, at times hovering around half their normal complement.

MNU says nurses are being mandated to work overtime at Parkview Place, a private care home run by Revera which is currently experiencing a COVID-19 outbreak. 

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COVID-19 in Ottawa: Fast Facts for Nov. 27, 2020 – CTV News Ottawa

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OTTAWA —
Good morning. Here is the latest news on COVID-19 and its impact on Ottawa.

Fast Facts:

  • Long-term care homes a top priority when COVID-19 vaccine arrives: Dr. Etches
  • Ottawa restauranteurs push for province-wide cap on delivery app fees
  • 24 new cases of COIVD-19 in Ottawa on Thursday
  • Ontario could see more than 9,000 new COVID-19 cases per day by end of 2020: new modelling
  • Ontario to test asymptomatic students and teachers at some Ottawa schools for COVID-19

Testing:

Who should get a test?

Ottawa Public Health says there are four reasons to seek testing for COVID-19:

  • You are showing COVID-19 symptoms. OR
  • You have been exposed to a confirmed case of the virus, as informed by Ottawa Public Health or exposure notification through the COVID Alert app. OR
  • You are a resident or work in a setting that has a COVID-19 outbreak, as identified and informed by Ottawa Public Health. OR
  • You are eligible for testing as part of a targeted testing initiative directed by the Ministry of Health or the Ministry of Long-Term Care.

Where to get tested for COVID-19 in Ottawa:

The COVID-19 Assessment Centre at 151 Brewer Way is open seven days a week. Appointments are required in most cases but LIMITED walk-up capacity is available.

To book a test for an adult, click here.

The CHEO Assessment Centre at Brewer Arena – 151 Brewer Way is open seven days a week. Testing is available by appointment only.

To book a test for a child under the age of 18, click here.

The COVID-19 Care and Testing Centre at 595 Moodie Dr. is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. The centre offers an appointment with a physician (including appropriate tests) for residents who are experiencing more significant symptoms like fever, difficulty breathing or a sore throat, or testing only for residents with mild symptoms or others who qualify for testing under current guidelines.

To book an appointment, click here. 

The COVID-19 Care and Testing Centre at 1485 Heron Rd. is open from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. The centre offers an appointment with a physician (including appropriate tests) for residents who are experiencing more significant symptoms like fever, difficulty breathing or a sore throat, or testing only for residents with mild symptoms or others who qualify for testing under current guidelines.

To book an appointment, click here.

The COVID-19 Care and Testing Centre at the Ray Friel Recreation Complex – 1585 Tenth Line Rd. is open Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. It offers an appointment with a physician (including appropriate tests) for residents who are experiencing more significant symptoms like fever, difficulty breathing or a sore throat, or testing only for residents with mild symptoms or others who qualify for testing under current guidelines.

To book an appointment, click here.

The COVID-19 drive-thru assessment centre at the National Arts Centre. The centre is open seven days a week, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

To book an appointment, click here.

The COVID-19 Assessment Centre at the McNabb Community Centre, located at 180 Percy Street, is open Monday to Friday, 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

To book an appointment, click here.

The Centretown Community Health Centre at 420 Cooper St. offers COVID-19 testing from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday. To book an appointment, call 613-789-1500.

The Sandy Hill Community Health Centre at 221 Nelson St. offers COVID-19 testing from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday to Friday.  Click here to book an appointment or call 613-789-1500

The Somerset Community Health Centre at 55 Eccles St. will offer COVID-19 testing from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday to Thursday, and 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Friday. To book an appointment, call 613-789-1500.

See here for a list of other testing sites in Ottawa and eastern Ontario.

COVID-19 screening tool:

The COVID-19 screening tool for students heading back to in-person classes can be found here.

Symptoms:

Classic Symptoms: fever, new or worsening cough, shortness of breath

Other symptoms: sore throat, difficulty swallow, new loss of taste or smell, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, pneumonia, new or unexplained runny nose or nasal congestion

Less common symptoms: unexplained fatigue, muscle aches, headache, delirium, chills, red/inflamed eyes, croup

When a COVID-19 vaccine arrives in Ottawa, the city’s top doctor suggests the top priority will be using the vaccine to prevent hospitalizations and deaths in long-term care homes.

Health Canada expects to approve the Pfizer vaccine candidate in Canada by the end of the year.

Speaking on Newstalk 580 CFRA’s Ottawa Now with Kristy Cameron, Dr. Vera Etches said Ottawa Public Health will be working with the Federal government, the Ontario government and the City of Ottawa’s COVID-19 task force on rolling out the vaccine.

“What we’re anticipating is the initial supplies will come in the early part of the year but they’ll be limited in number. They’ll be for the priority groups, most likely trying to prevent hospitalizations and deaths. So where do we see the hospitalizations and deaths, mostly unfortunately from long-term care,” said Dr. Etches Thursday afternoon.

“So I know that will be a population we want to really be prepared to get the vaccine to people as soon as we receive it. That will probably be the initial focus for the first three months of the year.”

Ottawa restauranteurs want the Ontario government to extend a cap on delivery app fees to all restaurants and bars in Ontario, not just places in COVID-19 hot zones.

The Progressive Conservatives introduced legislation on Thursday that would give the province the authority to temporarily limit how much apps such as UberEats and DoorDash can charge restaurants in the lockdown COVID-19 restriction zone for their services.

While advocates say the move is a good start, local restauranteurs are also calling for the measure to be applied across the province.

“Nobody’s really going to the restaurants, it’s a very difficult time, whether you’re mandated to close or not, so lowering these fees definitely would be an incredible help,” said Andre Schad, owner of Jasper Sports Bar.

Uber Eats

Twenty-four more Ottawa residents have tested positive for COVID-19.

Ottawa Public Health reported 24 new cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa on Thursday. There are no new deaths linked to novel coronavirus.

Since the first case of COVID-19 in Ottawa on March 11, there have been 8,278 laboratory confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa, including 372 deaths.

Across Ontario, there were 1,478 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday, including 572 new cases in Peel Region, 356 in Toronto and 111 in York Region.

New modelling suggests that in a worst-case scenario, Ontario could see more than 9,000 new cases of COVID-19 per day by the end of the year.

The modelling suggests that if COVID-19 cases grow at a rate of three per cent, Ontario will record more than 4,000 cases per day by Dec. 30.

If cases grow at a rate of five per cent, Ontario could see more than 9,000 cases per day by that date.

Cases of the novel coronavirus in Ontario have been growing at a much lower rate of 0.45 per cent over the past 14 days.

Students at some schools in Ottawa will be able to get tested for COVID-19, even if they’re not showing any symptoms of the virus.

The Ontario government announced “targeted voluntary testing” for asymptomatic students and staff at schools in Ottawa, Toronto, Peel and York Regions with high cases of COVID-19.

In a statement to CTV News Ottawa, the Ottawa COVID-19 Testing Taskforce said school-based testing would be considered at schools where individuals have tested positive and there’s a number of close contacts recommended to seek testing.

“While Ottawa has recently seen stabilizing or lowering COVID-19 indicators, the taskforce and its partners continue to seek opportunities to leverage testing capacity and break chains of virus transmission, especially in priority settings in our community such as schools, (long-term care homes), etc.,” said the taskforce.

“Our goal is to make it easier to get tested by providing the testing at or near the school. The focus is on individuals without symptoms, and symptomatic individuals are asked to seek testing from regional assessment centres or care clinics.”

Classroom

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New Brunswick leaves Atlantic bubble as Nova Scotia reports 14 new COVID-19 cases Thursday – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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Nova Scotia is reporting 14 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday, bringing the total number of active cases in the province to 114.

Twelve of the new cases are in the central health zone, which includes Halifax, Eastern Shore and West Hants. The other remaining cases are in the northern zone and the western zone.

It’s not clear whether the new cases are related to previously reported ones.

In a live briefing Thursday, Blair Higgs, the premier of New Brunswick, announced that New Brunswick will leave the Atlantic bubble.

“Effective midnight tonight, we’re resorting back to our original 14-days isolation for anyone from anywhere travelling into New Brunswick,” he said.

Exemptions for essential travel will continue, he added.

New Brunswick is the third province to reinstate the 14-day isolation for travellers from within Atlantic Canada. Newfoundland and Labrador and P.E.I. made the changes on Monday.

Negative, left, and positive rapid tests are seen at the rapid-testing pop-up site in the Richard Murray Design Building in Halifax on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020. – Tim Krochak

Nova Scotia Health Authority’s labs completed 2,253 Nova Scotia tests on Wednesday, the highest number of tests reported to date. There were 856 tests administered at the rapid-testing pop-up site in downtown Halifax on that day.

Five presumptive positive cases were identified at the pop-up site. The individuals were directed to self-isolate and have been referred for a standard test. Cases identified through rapid testing won’t be added to the total number of cases until they are confirmed by a standard test.

Rapid-testing clinics are targeted at people in the 18-35 age group or those who have been to or work at a bar in the Halifax Regional Municipality. Locations and times of the pop-up clinics, which could change every time, are announced on social media.

“We’ve seen a great uptake for asymptomatic testing among Halifax bar staff and patrons. People are showing us how much they care about their communities by going to these pop-up rapid testing locations,” said Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer of health in a news release. “This has allowed us to detect a few cases among asymptomatic people early on and helps to stop the spread of the virus.”

Late Wednesday evening, the Department of Health and Wellness released a new list of potential exposure sites, which includes numerous establishments across Halifax. And on Thursday evening, an additional six locations were added:

  • Stillwell (1672 Barrington St., Halifax) on Nov. 20 between 6 p.m. and 12:30 a.m. Watch for symptoms up to and including Dec. 4.
  • Bearly’s House of Blues and Ribs (1269 Barrington St., Halifax) on Nov. 20 between 8:30 p.m. and 2 a.m. Watch for symptoms up to and including Dec. 4.
  • Highwayman (1673 Barrington St., Halifax) on Nov. 21 between 7:30 p.m. and 12 a.m. Watch for symptoms up to and including Dec. 5.
  • Gahan House (5239 Sackville St., Halifax) on Nov. 21 between 2:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Watch for symptoms up to and including Dec. 5.
  • Princess Nails (1475 Bedford Highway, Bedford) on Nov. 21 between 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.  Watch for symptoms up to and including Dec. 5.
  • Boston Pizza Dartmouth Crossing (111 Shubie Dr., Dartmouth) on Nov. 20 between 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. and Nov. 22 between 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.  Watch for symptoms up to and including Dec. 6.

The department has created a new website that lists all of the potential exposure sites so far. There were 132 locations on the list as of Thursday evening. 

Starting today, new public health restrictions have come into effect in the Halifax and Hants counties. They include the closure of licensed establishments and bars for dine-in. Museums, libraries, and fitness and recreational facilities are also closed.

Over the past two months, Nova Scotia has had 167 positive COVID-19 cases, 38,434 negative test results. No one is currently in hospital.

A rapid COVID-19 test being administered at a pop-up COVID-19 testing site in the Ricard Murray Design Building on Morris Street in Halifax on Tuesday Nov. 24, 2020. -  - Tim Krochak
A rapid COVID-19 test being administered at a pop-up COVID-19 testing site in the Ricard Murray Design Building on Morris Street in Halifax on Tuesday Nov. 24, 2020. – – Tim Krochak

Numbers in Atlantic Canada

New Brunswick has 105 active cases as it reported 12 new cases Thursday.

Newfoundland and Labrador reported three new cases on Thursday, bringing the total number of active cases to 28.

Prince Edward Island has two active cases. No new cases were reported Thursday.

COVID-19 symptoms

Anyone who is currently experiencing or has experienced within the last 48 hours one of the following symptoms should visit https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca for a self-assessment:

  • new or worsening cough
  • fever (i.e. chills or sweats)

People should also visit the website if they are experiencing two or more of the following symptoms (new or worsening):

  • sore throat
  • runny nose or nasal congestion
  • headache
  • shortness of breath

People can also call 811 if they can’t access the website or if they wish to speak to a nurse. Anyone experiencing symptoms should self-isolate until they receive advice from Public Health on what to do next.

Online booking for COVID-19 tests is available for all primary assessment sites. The swish and gargle COVID-19 test is available at all centres for children aged four to 18.

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What you need to know about COVID-19 in B.C. for Nov. 27 – CBC.ca

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THE LATEST:

  • Health officials will provide their daily update in a live briefing at 3 p.m. PT.
  • 887 new cases of COVID-19 were announced on Thursday, along with 13 more deaths.
  • There have been 29,973 confirmed cases in the province to date.
  • There are 7,899 people with active cases of the disease across B.C.
  • 294 patients are in hospital with COVID-19, including 64 in intensive care.
  • 384 people have now died of the disease.

B.C.’s second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic is showing no signs of slowing, with another 887 new cases confirmed on Thursday and 13 more deaths.

That brings the number of active cases in the province to 7,899. A total of 294 patients are in hospital with COVID-19, including 64 in intensive care.

The Fraser Health and Vancouver Coastal Health regions continue to drive this phase of the pandemic, accounting for 88 per cent of the new cases announced Thursday.

In a written statement, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix urged everyone to stick with public health measures meant to stem the spread of the disease.

“Slow and steady is what we need with COVID-19 and it is how we will get through this second wave. The efforts we make each day make a difference,” they said.

Henry and Dix are scheduled to give an update on the pandemic response in a live briefing at 3 p.m. PT.

It comes a little more than a week after strict new restrictions and rules were put in place in B.C., including wide-ranging mask orders for indoor public and retail environments.

Health officials have told British Columbians to pause all social interactions and be vigilant applying different layers of protection, including physical distancing, washing hands and using masks.

READ MORE:

What’s happening elsewhere in Canada

There have now been more than 353,097 cases of COVID-19 in Canada.

On Thursday, federal officials sought to reassure Canadians that they have a plan to procure and distribute millions of COVID-19 vaccines in early 2021. Dr. Howard Njoo, Canada’s deputy chief public health officer, said as many as six million doses could be deployed in the first three months of the new year.

Canada is expected to receive at least 194 million vaccine doses, with contractual options for 220 million more. 

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Common symptoms include:

  • Fever.
  • Cough.
  • Tiredness.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Loss of taste or smell.
  • Headache.

But more serious symptoms can develop, including difficulty breathing and pneumonia.

What should I do if I feel sick?

Use the B.C. Centre for Disease Control’s COVID-19 self-assessment tool. Testing is recommended for anyone with symptoms of cold or flu, even if they’re mild. People with severe difficulty breathing, severe chest pain, difficulty waking up or o​​​​​​ther extreme symptoms should call 911.

What can I do to protect myself?

  • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly. Keep them clean.
  • Keep your distance from people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Wear a mask in indoor public spaces.
  • Be aware of evolving travel advisories to different regions.

More detailed information on the outbreak is available on the federal government’s website.

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