Connect with us

Media

Media at a flashpoint: 2019 year in review – CNN

Published

 on


Here is a very incomplete look back at the year in media, especially when it intersected with government, business, culture, and entertainment.

News about the news

In year three of the Trump presidency, journalists reached for new ways to describe the tumultuous times — I noticed “the victim president,” “the Infowars president,” “the conspiracy theory president,” “the ‘say anything’ president,” and “the grifter president,” just to name a few. In Foxland, Lou Dobbs called him “the greatest president in our history.” At the end of the year, of course, it was “the impeached president.”
Trump’s mendacity and his propaganda machine’s complicity hit new heights during the impeachment inquiry. Washington Post fact-checker Glenn Kessler reported at the end of the year that “Trump said more false or misleading claims in 2019 than he did in 2017 and 2018 combined.” There were signs of exhaustion and numbness — the ever-present “Trump fatigue.”
The president’s near-daily complaints about the news media almost faded into the background, but there were times when the extreme nature of his rhetoric was newly shocking. In June he accused the New York Times of a “virtual act of treason” and threatened a Time journalist with prison over a Kim Jong Un letter. In September he tweeted that two Washington Post reporters “shouldn’t even be allowed on the grounds of the White House.” That same month, a federal judge ruled that the White House had to restore press access to Playboy columnist Brian Karem, who had been suspended for 30 days.
Trump also complained about Fox News more than a dozen times, usually when news anchors were reporting fact-based news or when Democratic politicians were speaking on the channel. He griped about Fox’s scientific polls and occasionally promoted OANN, a far-right channel that wants to reach Fox’s viewers. But despite the barbs, Trump leaned heavily on support from the channel’s right-wing commentators and took his cues from their shows. Fox’s chief news anchor Shep Smith suddenly resigned in October, the most high-profile example of news being squeezed out by opinion on the channel.
Back in DC, the Mueller probe came and went; on-camera White House press briefings were scrapped; and Stephanie Grisham took over as press secretary. Sanders accepted a Fox News contributor gig.
Arguably the most shocking media/politics story of the year broke in February when Amazon founder Jeff Bezos alleged that the National Enquirer attempted to extort and blackmail him. Bezos — the owner of the Washington Post and a longtime Trump target— implied that it was a political hit job.

Entertainment’s new world order

The Disney-Fox deal took effect in March, creating a media company of unparalleled scale, and a slimmed-down Fox Corp focused on live news and sports. Disney dominated the year at the box office and launched a flagship streaming service, Disney+, that will define the company’s future.
All the talk about Disney+ and other streaming launches reflected the fact that Netflix is the pace setter, establishing the model for the new streaming world order. Netflix tripled down on its original content bets, competing with the likes of Apple and Amazon.
Richard Plepler stepped down at HBO and Bob Greenblatt joined WarnerMedia (CNN’s parent company) in a top content job that included oversight of HBO. The company’s top priority became the HBO Max streaming service, which will launch in April. WarnerMedia CEO John Stankey was promoted to president and COO of AT&T, putting him in line to succeed Randall Stephenson. AT&T fended off an activist shareholder campaign. Verizon continued to shrink its digital media footprint while focusing on 5G. Sprint and T-Mobile tried to merge.
At NBCUniversal, the top priority was Peacock, which will launch in May. NBCU CEO Steve Burke will step aside on January 1, making way for Jeff Shell.
Apple launched new subscription products in both news and entertainment. (Reminder: I’m a consulting producer on one of Apple’s shows.) Analysts predicted that an Apple bundle is on the way. Other bundles launched in other categories: For instance, Luminary launched in the ever-more-crowded podcast space.
Spotify acquired podcasting companies like Gimlet Media and inked deals with programmers like Barack and Michelle Obama. Sometimes it seemed like everyone had a podcast. But companies kept betting that the ecosystem has room to grow.
Media business stories, meantime, kept giving inspiration to Hollywood storytellers: Look no further than “Succession,” “The Loudest Voice,” “Bombshell,” and, yes, “The Morning Show…”

Business interrupted

Upheaval in digital media continued: A private equity firm acquired a set of beloved websites — including Gizmodo, Kotaku, Deadspin, Jezebel, and The Onion — from Univision. By the end of the year Deadspin was a figment of its former self. Vice bought Refinery29, Bustle Media Group bought multiple brands, and more and more websites put up pay walls to spur subscriber revenue. More and more digital newsrooms pushed to unionize.
While losses accumulated in local news, big tech companies said they would do more to support the fragile news ecosystem that has suffered from digital disruption. For the first time, Facebook started to directly pay publishers for opening up their content to the social network. Google’s support came in the form of grants and partnerships. Critics said the efforts were just a relative drop in the bucket, given the overwhelming size of the tech giants.
Despite the hardships and headwinds, news organizations produced ambitious work, from “The 1619 Project” and “The Privacy Project” at The New York Times to “The Afghanistan Papers” and “The Opioid Files” at the Washington Post. Miami Herald reporter Julie K. Brown was celebrated for her intrepid reporting about Jeffrey Epstein’s crimes. “We were assisted by some excellent investigative journalism,” prosecutors said when announcing Epstein’s arrest.
Newspapers explored new models to stay in business. Consolidation continued, with Gannett and Gatehouse coming together in a takeover deal that immediately led to further layoffs. In Utah, the Salt Lake Tribune became the first metropolitan daily paper in the United States to file with the IRS and turn into a nonprofit enterprise.
Speaking of not-for-profit media, John Lansing became the new chief executive at NPR, succeeding Jarl Mohn.
In other transitions, Kevin Tsujihara stepped down amid controversy and Ann Sarnoff became the new CEO of the Warner Bros studio. Adam Moss retired from New York Magazine and David Haskell took over.

Changing of the guards

In the television news world, Susan Zirinsky took charge at CBS News, signed Gayle King to a new contract, and moved Norah O’Donnell to the “Evening News.” Tony Dokoupil and Anthony Mason joined King on “CBS This Morning.” Steve Kroft retired from “60 Minutes.”
At NBC, Andy Lack and Noah Oppenheim weathered the “Catch & Kill” storm, and Oppenheim signed a new contract, putting him in line to succeed Lack after the 2020 election.
At Vice, news boss Josh Tyrangiel left when HBO’s “Vice News Tonight” was canceled. Vice hired Jesse Angelo to be the new news and entertainment chief.
Executives in newsrooms and Hollywood boardrooms increasingly came to believe that their competitors weren’t just down the street or across the country, but across platforms and around the world. The short-form video sharing app TikTok was a sensation, and it originated in China. Esports consumed more and more viewing time. The massive multiplayer game “Fortnite” collapsed into a black hole, reinvented itself and, in the words of the Los Angeles Times, “remained a massive force.”
Attention was the currency, whether people were recording a funny video on a phone or buying tickets for a live taping of a podcast or getting news alerts on a smart watch or riding a connected bike. What captured your attention in 2019?

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Media

Media Advisory: Premier Furey, Minister Coady and Minister Haggie to Announce Mandatory Vaccination Policy – News Releases – Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

Published

 on


The Honourable Andrew Furey, Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Honourable Siobhan Coady, Deputy Premier and President of Treasury Board, and the Honourable John Haggie, Minister of Health and Community Services, will announce the province’s mandatory vaccination policy today (Friday, October 15) at 1:00 p.m. at the Media Centre, East Block, Confederation Building.

The event will be live-streamed on the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Facebook and YouTube accounts. Media covering the announcement will have the opportunity to join in person in the media centre or by teleconference. Media planning to attend this event should register with Jillian Hood (jillianhood@gov.nl.ca) by 11:00 a.m.

Technical Briefing

Prior to the event, a technical briefing for media will be held at 12:00 p.m.

Media attending the briefing will have the opportunity to join in person in the media centre or by teleconference. Media who wish to participate in the technical briefing should RSVP to Jillian Hood (jillianhood@gov.nl.ca), who will provide the details and the required information.

Media must join the teleconference at 11:45 a.m. (NST) to be included on the call. For sound quality purposes, registered media are asked to use a land line if at all possible.

-30-

Media contacts
Meghan McCabe
Office of the Premier
709-729-3960
meghanmccabe@gov.nl.ca

Victoria Barbour
Treasury Board Secretariat
709-729-4087
victoriabarbour@gov.nl.ca

Lesley Clarke
Health and Community Services
709-729-6986, 699-2910
lesleyclarke@gov.nl.ca

2021 10 15
9:11 am

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

In 2022 Mobile Will Replace Direct Mail As The Top Local Media Advertising Platform – Forbes

Published

 on


In yet another sign that marketers are allocating more of the ad budget to digital media. In 2022, BIA projects for the first time, in the local marketplace, more ad dollars will be allocated to mobile than any other medium including direct mail.

As the ad marketplace continues to recover post-pandemic, BIA forecasts local media ad spend to total $161.5 billion, a year-over-year increase of 10.1%. In 2022, BIA still expects more ad dollars will be spent on traditional media ($84.6billion) than will digital media ($76.8 billion). Although BIA forecasts local digital ad spend to exceed local traditional media in 2023. The digital duopoly of Google ($26.8 billion) and Facebook ($14.3 billion) is projected to account for slightly over half of all digital ad dollars spent locally next year. In addition, with mid-term elections set for November 2022, BIA expects $7.5 billion in total political ad spend. 

Next year local ad spend for mobile is expected to reach $34.0 billion, accounting for 21% of all ad dollars. Direct Mail, which had been the leader in local ad spend for many years, is expected to total $33.4 billion (20.7%) in ad spend. BIA ad spend forecast for PC/laptop is forecast at $27.5 billion (17.1%). Local advertisers are projected to allocate $21.0 billion in 2022 (13.0%) for television. Rounding out the top five will be local radio at $12.7 billion (7.9%).

When local television ad spend is broken out, BIA projects terrestrial TV to garner $19.3 billion in ad dollars next year and an additional $1.7 billion being allocated toward digital. Overall, local television ad revenue will have a strong year-over-year increase of 26.5%. Helping to drive the growth for local TV will be the political dollars. BIA estimates that local broadcast TV will total $3.4 billion next year in political ad dollars, making it the largest product category for the medium.

Similarly, for local radio, a large majority of ad dollars are expected to be allocated to over-the-air ($11.0 billion) with $1.7 billion going to digital. Radio, which doesn’t get the political ad dollars that television receives, will still benefit as more employees commute to and from work.

In a press release Rick Ducey, managing director of BIA Advisory Services, points to four reasons why mobile has surpassed direct mail and is expected to be the top advertising medium in 2022 and beyond:

·       COVID’s impact on consumer’s increased time spent with mobile and other digital media making digital the place to find and target consumers.

·       Digital’s overall momentum in winning more revenue share of media time from traditional media.

·       The rise of virtual consumer channels like delivery, curbside pickup and e-commerce in top categories like retail, restaurants, CPG where physical channels like retail store visits decline.

·       Greater consumer acceptance and use of virtual and e-commerce channels.

The growth in mobile ad spend has been driven by the change in media habits begun during the pandemic. eMarketer recently released a report that said mobile now accounts for one-third of all screen time every day. In 2021 daily time spent with mobile (non-voice) is expected to average 4 hours and 23 minutes, compared to 3 hours and 45 minutes in 2019. eMarketer expects mobile usage to increase by six minutes in both 2022 and 2023. In addition, time spent with mobile will account for over half (54.8%) of the nearly eight hours U.S. adults spend daily with digital media.

Within mobile, smartphone usage is the largest. The daily time spent with smartphones is expected to reach three hours and ten minutes in 2021, compared to 2 hours and 34 minutes in 2019. Smart phones usage now accounts for nearly one-quarter of total media time spent. Among the reasons cited for the leap in smartphone usage has been social media consumption led by TikTok, podcasting, gaming and shopping.

Among the results from Mary Meeker’s latest annual Internet Trends report is that mobile has become the first screen. Meeker also noted that nowadays three-quarters of web users regularly shop online with younger age groups more likely to use a mobile device for e-commerce.

Additionally, with the roll-out of the high-speed 5G, viewing to streaming video on mobile devices is expected to increase.

BIA expects mobile will continue to generate the most local ad dollars of any platform in the upcoming years.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

FSJ RCMP responds to social media post | Energeticcity.ca – Local news from Northeast BC – Energeticcity.ca

Published

 on


Constable Chad Neustaeter, Media Relations Officer for Fort St. John RCMP, says it would be appropriate to describe what was actually occurring. He says this same individual has been arrested for Mischief, Loss of Enjoyment to Property after the property owner reported the individual for busking, panhandling and making customers feel uncomfortable in late September.

The business owner knew the man had a court condition not to attend the property, and knowing the individual was breaching conditions of his release, called police.

“In this instance, a new frontline police officer to Fort St John was given the opportunity to work through the investigation process and was conducting police checks to determine if there were in fact conditions and what those conditions were in order to make an educated decision that was in everyone’s best interest,” said Neustaeter.

The author of the social media post asked the question ‘what are we paying them for?’ Neustaeter says officers were conducting a full investigation on behalf of the complainant.

“During the investigation, the man was apologetic to police. The lead investigating officer exercised discretion and released the man who said he would leave. The business was updated accordingly and were satisfied with the actions of police.”

Neustaeter says there is often more than meets the eye of the public when it comes to policing.

“In this case, the public also did not get a chance to see the conclusion when the man walked away and the business owner was satisfied.”

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending