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NASA tests 3D printer that uses Moon dust as construction material for future missions – Republic World

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NASA engineers have taken a step ahead in using technology to test the materials on the moon. In a recent study, Northrop Grumman Sygnus carried a 3D printer that uses moon dust to make solid material and arrived at the International Space Station (ISS). 

According to the Universe Today report, the agency sent a 3D printer to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the Redwire Regolith Print (RRP) project to use readily available materials on the moon to make what is required instead of having to haul lots of heavy equipment all the way from Earth.

The space agency informed that RRP was designed to enable the use of regolith including dust, broken rocks, and other materials found on the surface of extraterrestrial objects for the on-demand construction of lunar structures. The project was launched with the Made In Space Manufacturing Device (ManD) 3D printer that was already onboard the ISS.

NASA said, “The primary objective of performing the print operations is to successfully demonstrate the manufacturing process capability in microgravity. The secondary objective of the print operations is to produce material samples for scientific analysis”.

Considering the regolith-based 3D printing in microgravity, to further under the future missions to the moon and Mars, NASA said, “Such technology could eventually be used to construct habitats, landing pads, and other structures for future exploration missions using on-site materials, rather than having to bring along all the raw materials for such construction”. 

Further explaining the use of 3D printing projects on the earth’s surface, NASA informed, “Development of infrastructure to improve quality of life in remote and undeveloped areas and on-site emergency construction during natural disaster response.”

The Redwire Regolith Print project

Redwire’s Chief Technology Officer Michael Snyder explained the project and said, “The Redwire Regolith Print project is a tech demo of on-orbit additive manufacturing using regolith simulating feedstock material”.

Snyder further said, “This represents a critical step in developing sustainable manufacturing capabilities for lunar surfaces that will ultimately establish a permanent human presence off-earth by utilizing available resources with adaptive systems. So this is really exciting for the future and hopefully, something like this gets eventually deployed to the moon”.

(Image credit: TWITTER)

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SpaceX’s Inspiration4 Crew Shares Photos of Earth from Space – Beebom

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If you are a space enthusiast like myself, I’m sure you love the mesmerizing views of the Earth from space shared by astronauts. Having said that, chances are you will love the breathtaking pictures recently shared by the astronauts in SpaceX’s Inspiration4 spacecraft, which took off from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on September 15. It safely returned to Earth today.

The seven-seater SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft was recently launched from the Kennedy space center. Following the launch, astronauts from the Inspiration4 spacecraft shared four orbital photos of the Earth. You can check out the tweet right below.

The photos were taken from the cupola of the spacecraft, which is a dome-shaped, transparent viewing area that allows astronauts to get a unique glimpse of our planet from space. Not just that, SpaceX Inspiration4’s astronauts also shared a short video showing the sunset. You can check it out right here:

The astronauts include the Shift4 Payments CEO and founder Jared Isaacman, who financed the space mission and is currently the acting commander of the spacecraft, Air Force veteran Christopher Sembroski, physician assistant Hayley Arceneaux, and geoscientist Dr. Sian Proctor.

Now, it is worth mentioning that SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft can carry seven people onboard. However, the Inspiration4 mission only includes four astronauts aboard the spacecraft. As per reports, following the launch, the Inspiration4 spacecraft has now completed 15 orbits around Earth and is expected to complete a full orbit of the Earth every 90 minutes. If you want to monitor the progress of the flight, you can go to SpaceX’s official tracking website.

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More space tourism to come after Inspiration4 crew returns from successful mission | Watch News Videos Online – Globalnews.ca

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The first all-amateur crew to orbit the Earth without an astronaut aboard has safely returned. SpaceX founder Elon Musk picked them as his first rocket-riding tourists. As Jennifer Johnson reports, four more flights with paying customers are coming soon.

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World's first space tourists splash down in their SpaceX capsule after three days in orbit – Yahoo Eurosport UK

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Four space tourists safely splashed down in the Atlantic off the coast of Florida on Saturday, ending their trailblazing trip into orbit.

Their SpaceX capsule parachuted into the ocean just before sunset, not far from where their chartered flight began three days earlier.

SpaceX founder Elon Musk took them on as the company’s first rocket-riding tourists.

The fully automated Dragon capsule reached an unusually high altitude of miles 585km after Wednesday night’s liftoff, that’s 160km above the International Space Station.

The passengers were able to take in views of Earth through a big bubble-shaped window added to the top of the capsule.

For more on this story, watch the full report in the media player above.

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