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New Public Health Ontario COVID-19 data shows vaccines providing ‘high degree’ of protection – Global News

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New COVID-19 vaccine data released by Public Health Ontario appears to reinforce the effectiveness of how shots are curbing the confirmed cases, hospitalizations and deaths.

An epidemiological summary released by the provincial agency on Wednesday looked at cases between Dec. 14 and June 26, and scientists compared the cases with vaccination data from Ontario’s vaccine database.

“While vaccines provide a high degree of protection from COVID-19 infection, it is expected that a small proportion of vaccinated individuals may become infected as no vaccine is 100 per cent effective,” the document said.

“When COVID-19 cases occur following vaccination, there is evidence that vaccines reduce symptomatic infection, the severity of illness, as well as transmission.”

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Increased vaccinations, ongoing health measures could mean 600 fewer COVID-19 cases in Hamilton

Between mid-December and the end of June, more than 9.86 million people in Ontario received at least one dose of an approved vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna or AstraZeneca). During the same period of time, there were 400,413 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Officials said 3.9 per cent (15,592) of the total confirmed cases occurred in partially vaccinated individuals while 0.4 per cent (1,635) occurred in people who were fully immunized, dubbed “breakthrough” cases. They noted the proportion of cases increased in older individuals and those 80 and older had the highest number of cases.

Experts noted 51.7 per cent of those who got infected after being vaccinated did not have full immunity, noting it was less than 14 days from when the first dose was administered.

However, as time increased, officials said the number of post-vaccination cases fell “dramatically.” They said cases generally began to decline 10 days after the first dose was administered and a “marked decrease” was seen 28 or more days after the first dose.

Read more:
Doug Ford says next steps in Ontario’s COVID-19 reopening plan to be announced within 3 weeks

For people who had two vaccine doses, scientists said there were “very few cases” after the second shot and 4.6 per cent of post-vaccination cases happened 14 or more days after inoculation.

When it comes to deaths and hospitalizations, there was a stark difference between those who were vaccinated and unvaccinated.

Looking at those 12 and older who were asymptomatic and symptomatic before they died, 289 people were partially vaccinated and 34 were fully vaccinated. Meanwhile, the total number of fatal unvaccinated cases in the same age range was 4,284.

For those 12 and older who contracted COVID-19 and had to be admitted to an Ontario intensive care unit, 158 were partially vaccinated and 11 were fully vaccinated. The total number of unvaccinated patients admitted to an ICU was 3,388.

Read more:
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In terms of general hospital admissions (excluding ICU patients), 1,063 people were partially vaccinated and 90 were fully vaccinated. The total number of unvaccinated patients admitted to an ICU was 14,083.

Meanwhile, when it comes to the three COVID-19 vaccines being deployed across Ontario, experts looked at the efficacy of each jab. During the time period, 7,288,640 people received Pfizer-BioNTech shots while 1,711,099 people received Moderna and 864,745 received AstraZeneca.

The report said 0.16 per cent of recipients who were partially vaccinated with Pfizer-BioNTech, 0.11 per cent of recipients who were partially vaccinated with Moderna and 0.23 per cent of recipients who were partially vaccinated with AstraZeneca ultimately tested positive for COVID-19 (asymptomatic and symptomatic). For those who were fully vaccinated, 0.02 per cent had Pfizer-BioNTech, 0.02 per cent had Moderna and less than 0.01 per cent had AstraZeneca.

As for variants of concern, experts looked at asymptomatic and symptomatic case data between Feb. 3 and June 26. They found 53.6 per cent of partially vaccinated and breakthrough cases (8,935 people) involved the Alpha variant followed by 2.3 per cent (392 people) involving the Delta variant, 1.5 per cent (255 people) involving the Gamma variant and 0.5 per cent (79 people) involving the Beta variant. The rest of the cases involved mutations of interest and unconfirmed strains of COVID-19.

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Peel Region reports its first confirmed case of monkeypox – CP24 Toronto's Breaking News

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Peel Region has its first confirmed case of monkeypox.

According to Peel Public Health, the person infected is an adult male in his 30s who lives in Mississauga.

The heath unit said the risk to the public remains low.

Monkeypox, which comes from the same virus family as smallpox, spreads though close contact with an infected individual. Most transmission happens through close contact with the skin lesions of monkeypox, but the virus can also be spread by large droplets or by sharing contaminated items.

To reduce risk of infection, people are advised to be cautious when engaging in intimate activities with others. Vaccination is available for high-risk contacts of cases and for those deemed at high risk of exposure to monkeypox.

Symptoms can include fever, headache, fatigue, swollen lymph nodes, and a rash/lesions, which could appear on the face or genitals and then spread to other areas.

Anyone who develops these symptoms should contact their healthcare provider and avoid close contact with others until they have improved and rash/lesions have healed.

While most people recover on their own without treatment, those who have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for monkeypox should self-monitor for symptoms, and contact PPH to see if they are eligible for vaccination.

The Mississauga case is at least the 34th confirmed case of the disease in Ontario, with dozens more under investigation.

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Monkeypox case count rises to more than 3400 globally, WHO says – The Globe and Mail

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More than 3,400 confirmed monkeypox cases and one death were reported to the World Health Organization as of last Wednesday, with a majority of them from Europe, the agency said in an update on Monday.

WHO said that since June 17, 1,310 new cases were reported to the agency, with eight new countries reporting monkeypox cases.

Monkeypox is not yet a global health emergency, WHO ruled last week, although WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said he was deeply concerned about the outbreak.

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Sudbury news: Northern agencies highlight national HIV testing day | CTV News – CTV News Northern Ontario

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Monday was national HIV testing day. Officials say this year’s theme surrounds how getting tested is an act of self-care.

From clinics to self-testing kits, groups in the north say there are many options to get tested and everyone should use whichever way works best for them.

Just more than a year ago, Reseau Access Network in Sudbury teamed with Ready to Know and Get a Kit, groups that provide HIV self-testing kits at a pickup location.

Officials said it has been a huge success.

“We get a consistent number throughout each month and I can’t really divulge those figures, unfortunately, but as part of the overall study I can tell you the pickup of self-tests is a fraction of the amount of tests being ordered,” said Angel Riess, of Reseau Access Network.

“There’s actually a lot of tests being shipped to homes directly but I can confirm that they have been active and there’s a significant number of people who have chosen to engage in both programs.”

Elsewhere, the Aids Committee of North Bay and Area held a point-of-care testing clinic to mark the day.

“It’s an opportunity for us to remind everyone that getting tested is essential. If you don’t know you have HIV, you can’t take the steps to try to mitigate the possibility of spread,” said executive director Stacey Mayhall.

In addition to stopping the spread, knowing whether you are positive sooner rather than later can allow for a better quality of life.

“HIV is not a death sentence that it used to be,” said Riess.

“There have been advances in testing and medication and people can live long, healthy lives living with HIV.”

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