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On Politics: Trump Pledges to Halt Immigration – The New York Times

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Good morning and welcome to On Politics, a daily political analysis of the 2020 elections based on reporting by New York Times journalists.

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  • President Trump announced on Twitter last night that he would use an executive order to suspend all immigration into the United States in an attempt to quell the spread of the coronavirus. In recent weeks the administration had already barred asylum seekers and undocumented immigrants from entering the country, prompting objections from advocacy groups that he was using the crisis to further his anti-immigration agenda. As the virus spreads throughout the United States, and as his critics argue that he has not done enough to confront the pandemic, Trump has often pointed to his decision in late January to bar travel from China as evidence that he was working to confront it.

  • A dispute over virus testing is at the heart of the latest standoff in Washington: House Democrats say they are close to a deal with the president on the next phase of federal virus relief, but before they sign off they want a nationwide testing plan included in the bill. The legislation is already likely to include $25 billion for testing, as well as more than $300 billion in new loans for small businesses, and $75 billion for hospitals, but Republicans have thus far resisted instituting a national testing framework. The Senate’s Republican leadership has scheduled a session for 4 p.m. today, suggesting that it expects Trump and the Democrats to have come to an agreement by then. But on Monday, the president once again argued on Twitter that “States, not the Federal Government, should be doing the Testing.”

  • Protesters have gathered in states across the country over the past week, defying stay-at-home orders and demanding that their governors — in most cases, Democrats or moderate Republicans — lift lockdown restrictions. In Kentucky, where a number of well-attended protests have occurred, the Democratic governor, Andy Beshear, announced over the weekend that the state had begun to experience a higher rate of infection. Beshear has said that he will not begin to lift restrictions until the state’s infection rate has been in decline for 14 consecutive days. But some other Southern states are moving to reopen, making them canaries in the mine as the nation wonders when a return to public life will become safe. In South Carolina, many retail stores will be allowed to reopen today after the governor decided to ignore federal health officials’ recommendations. Georgia is set to follow by the end of the week, and in Tennessee, the governor has indicated that he will let stay-at-home restrictions in many places lapse on May 1.

  • Nearly three-quarters of the inmate population at a prison in Ohio has tested positive for the virus, making it the country’s leading single source of reported infections, with over 1,800. Across the country, from North Carolina to Louisiana to California, jails and prisons are considered among the highest-risk places to be during the pandemic because of their crowded conditions. Some cities and states — including New York and California — have begun to release a limited number of nonviolent offenders in order to reduce crowding. But prisoners’ rights advocates continue to argue that the virus warrants a more widespread reduction to the prison population.

  • Perhaps not surprisingly, many of Trump’s disgraced allies are seeking to jump the line and get out of prison now, arguing that the virus puts them at undue risk. Paul Manafort and Rick Gates, former top officials on Trump’s campaign who are now behind bars, have filed separate motions asking to serve the rest of their sentences at home. It’s also possible that the president could use the virus as an opportunity to grant clemency to some of his allies. When asked at a news conference on Sunday whether he was considering issuing more pardons, Trump pointed to Manafort, Roger Stone and Michael Flynn as people who had been “treated unfairly,” adding: “What am I going to do? You’ll find out what I’m going to do.”


President Trump during the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on Monday.


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Amy Klobuchar, a Democratic senator from Minnesota and a potential vice-presidential pick for Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, joined Biden on his podcast for a wide-ranging conversation that quickly took on a strikingly personal tone.

At a time when many voters are more focused on their own vulnerability than on the politics of a general election, Klobuchar spoke to Biden about her husband’s battle with the coronavirus, though he is now on the mend. Speaking on Monday’s episode of the podcast, “Here’s the Deal,” she called it “the most lonely, horrific disease.”

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Biden, whose first wife and daughter died in a car crash and whose son Beau died of brain cancer in 2015, has sought to use his personal experiences with grief to connect with struggling voters. That goal has been made more difficult these days by social distancing, and by the fact that Trump enjoys the bully pulpit of the presidency amid the crisis.

Klobuchar suggested that Biden’s “empathy” was a critical factor in her decision to support him, a choice that helped put wind in his sails on the eve of Super Tuesday. And she previewed a contrast Democrats are hoping to draw with Trump over matters of character.

“That sense that you have, which has marked your whole life from your own losses, of empathy, is something that we are missing right now in the White House,” Klobuchar said.

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Northern Ireland after coronavirus: three scenarios for politics and peace – The Conversation UK

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When it comes to disruptions from outside, the Northern Ireland conflict has a reputation for being immune to them. Winston Churchill observed this after the first world war, in one of the most quoted remarks on Irish politics:

… as the deluge subsides and the waters fall short we see the dreary steeples of Fermanagh and Tyrone emerging once again. The integrity of their quarrel is one of the few institutions that has been unaltered in the cataclysm which has swept the world.

A century later, the “integrity of their quarrel”, for the most part, remains. That said, external developments like the US civil rights campaign, the end of the cold war and the EU have influenced events in the region.

So far, the coronavirus pandemic has interacted with Northern Ireland politics in some intriguing ways. At the beginning of the crisis in mid-March, the cross-community executive became split on whether to follow Dublin’s lead in immediately closing schools or stick with the UK’s more relaxed approach.

Yet since then, the first and deputy first ministers, Arlene Foster and Michelle O’Neill, have maintained a mostly united front. This has been in contrast with the three years before January 2020, when their parties wouldn’t work together, leaving Northern Ireland without devolution. The mere sight of Northern Ireland’s provincial politicians, schooled in the tribal minutia of a nationalist conflict, battling a global natural disaster has been arresting.

North-south co-operation has also been in the spotlight. This is a key part of the Good Friday Agreement. While Belfast and Dublin agreed they would share information on the virus, deficiencies in coordination have been exposed.

Another feature of the crisis in Northern Ireland has been the outpouring of support for the NHS from across society. Remarkably, murals praising this (British) institution have appeared in both unionist and nationalist areas.

Does any of this matter? When the deluge of COVID-19 subsides, there are three possible scenarios. The first is, of course, that there won’t be any long-term consequences of the pandemic and that political life picks up mostly where it left off.

However, the pandemic could, on the other hand, worsen divisions. Stormont now has its own roadmap out of lockdown, which is different to those of both London and Dublin. This has cross-community support but there is still plenty of room for unionists and nationalists to split over virus policy.

Anger at the Conservative government’s handling of the crisis, and the prominence of the devolved administrations, could hasten the end of the UK, with all the tumult that would bring to Northern Ireland. Paramilitary murders and threats have continued during the shutdown. And the dreary steeples of Brexit have never been fully out of view.

A chance to change

But a third possibility – and narrowly, the most likely – is that the virus, overall, has a stabilising influence. It could put political identity politics into perspective.

While COVID-19 is an external shock, it has shone a light on existing social realities: inequality; challenges in education; the quality of people’s environment, lifestyle and relationships; and above all, the health service. Public interest in these issues may increase over Orange-Green politics.

As the success of the non-aligned Alliance Party and Greens in the 2019 election showed, this process was already under way. Before the crisis, the main parties knew that the current period of devolution could be the last chance they get to show the public that they can govern effectively. The socio-economic damage of the shutdown may stimulate bold, unprecedented policy solutions.

Deputy First Minister Michelle O’Neill and First Minister Arlene Foster prepare to present their coronavirus plan.
PA

Irish republicans have argued that the pandemic, which respects no borders, proves the illogic of partition on a small island. But pandemics, we hope, will not be something Ireland or any country has to face often. And the problem of differing strategies between neighbouring countries is not unique to Ireland, but has been felt across Britain and Europe. The crisis may actually slow the momentum of the Irish unity discussion, which had been given so much oxygen by Brexit, especially given the looming financial pressures.

When the dust settles, Northern Ireland could have a stable executive focused on everyday politics in the north, pragmatically aligned with Dublin or London or Brussels on particular issues. In other words, the region could find itself closer to the vision of the Good Friday Agreement than it has been for some years.

What is beyond doubt is that sectarianism, Northern Ireland’s local brand of social distancing, offers no protection from an infectious disease. Whatever its legacy, COVID-19’s indiscrimination proves that the physical space is in fact a shared one. Those who live in that space share the same fate, no matter the imagined national communities to which they purport to belong.

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Politics – Moe must continue to remember his roots – Yorkton This Week

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More so than just about any business you can think of, politics is all about knowing whom you are and where you have come from.

The problem, however, is that it’s quite easy to forget all that, even under normal circumstances.

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And with the stakes so high in this COVID-19 crisis, it’s likely even harder for our leadership to remember the fundamentals of this province.

As such, Premier Scott Moe had some mixed results in being able to do so.

There is one area in which Moe has been rather successful in remembering where he has come from and reminding all of us in Saskatchewan of exactly who we are.

The Premier recently wrote: “Hats off to our farmer for perseverance and hard work this season” to congratulate that seeding was at the five-year for this date.

In a world where nothing seems normal – Saskatchewan lost a staggering 53,000 jobs in April – agriculture saw a 1.4-per-cent increase in employment in April as seeding got into full swing.

It’s done so without receiving anything resembling the federal subsidies other business are getting. So far, only $252 million has been made available to farmers across the country to deal with effect of COVID-19 – very little of which has made its way to western farmers and ranchers. Moreover, it’s only one-tenth of what the Canadian Federation of Agriculture requested.

Yet farmers are demonstrating what Moe aptly described as “perseverance” in carrying on with seeding that will be an estimated 37 million acres this year. Some of them have had to leave last year’s crop in the field because of horrific harvest conditions last fall.

Agriculture is simply soldiering on, pumping millions into the local economy as farmers buy seed, fertilizers, chemicals and fuel.

The net result is that Saskatchewan has seen an increase in exports in the first quarter of 2020, largely due to canola, pulse, agricultural machinery, oats and soya beans sales.

 It is important for Moe and others to acknowledge what we are – especially, in these tough times when the impact of the pandemic is taking its toll on all of us.

However, Moe and his government hasn’t always been quite so successful at remembering its roots, as was demonstrated by the recent Saskatchewan Health Authority driven decision to temporary close to 12 rural hospital emergency rooms as part of the SHA’s pandemic readiness plan.

One gets the need to prepare health staff everywhere in the province for the potential impact of a COVID-19 outbreak.

But the simply fact of the matter is there has been no more than one active COVID-19 case in all of central and southern rural Saskatchewan for a month. To even “temporarily” completely close rural ERs during seeding poses a very real problem.

That it comes from a government that represents all 29 rural seats is even more bizarre.

It took a letter from 21-year Arm River-Watrous MLA Greg Brkich to the SHA and to his own cabinet before the Sask. Party administration seemed to realize this.

In his letter, Brkich expressed frustration over the temporary closure of the Davidson Hospital ER – the only hospital between Regina, Saskatoon, Moose Jaw and Outlook.

“Local folks are being short changed again in rural Saskatchewan” by being left without quality emergency care, Brkich wrote.

Given the history of the closure of 52 rural hospitals by the former NDP government 27 years ago, it’s especially strange that the Sask. Party government would have missed the significance of what it was doing.

To his credit, Moe took responsibility for the “communication” problem and offered assurances the closed ERs would be re-opened in mid-June.

But it does seem to demonstrate how important it is for politicians to remember where they come from.

Murray Mandryk has been covering provincial politics since 1983.

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Politics This Morning: Parliamentary group calls for creation of special Hong Kong envoy – The Hill Times

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Good Thursday morning,

A handful of Parliamentarians from Canada, New Zealand, and the U.K. have banded together to call on their governments to establish a special envoy for Hong Kong to address the situation in Hong Kong, where a new national security law from China that bypasses the city’s legislature is expected to come into effect this fall. Liberal MP Michael Levitt, the Canadian representative of the group, issued a press release saying “we must move rapidly to ensure there is a system in place for the observation and transparent reporting of the true impact this new law will have on currently legal freedoms in Hong Kong.” The group sent letters to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and UN Secretary General António Guterres, appealing to them for their support in providing a mandate for an envoy to be deployed when the special session convenes later this month.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said that foreign detractors who are raising alarm over the new law are applying “blatant double standards.” She argued that China within its rights to introduce the law because of the local resistance.

Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland, in a press briefing, said the some 300,000 Canadians living abroad in Hong Kong are “very, very welcome to come home anytime.” She was asked whether the government is considering following the U.K.’s lead in pledging to admit three million people from Hong, making what he called would be one of the “biggest changes” to the country’s visa system. Ms. Freeland declined to say whether it’s being considered, only noting that “Canada  continues to be a country that welcomes immigrants and asylum seekers from around the world.”

A joint Canada-U.S. study found that hydroxychloroquine—the drug frequently touted by U.S. President Donald Trump as a preventative medication for COVID-19—is ineffective at inoculating one’s self from contracting the virus. Mr. Trump had made the claims about its effectiveness without scientific basis, saying that he was taking the drug himself.

Canada’s Supreme Court is ready to make the switch to virtual hearings amid the pandemic. Starting next week, the top court will be conducting hearings over Zoom.

All four police officers at the scene where George Floyd died now face charges for their alleged role in his death. The lesser charges include aiding and abetting, while Derek Chauvin, the white officer who was first charged, is now facing second-degree murder, which was upgraded from third-degree murder.

Former Conservative cabinet minister Stockwell Day stepped down from his post as a board member of Telus amid outcry over his comments equating racism with getting teased for wearing glasses during an interview with CBC. The telecom giant issued a statement distancing itself from Mr. Day, saying his views “are not reflective of the values and beliefs of our organization.” In a tweet, retreating from his remarks the previous day, Mr. Day said, “by feedback from many in the Black and other communities I realize my comments in debate on Power and Politics were insensitive and hurtful.I ask forgiveness for wrongly equating my experience to theirs.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is scheduled to deliver remarks during the virtual Global Vaccine Summit, which the U.K. is hosting. The summit kicks off at 8 a.m.

In other scheduled events, the House Affairs and Procedure Committee is scheduled to meet at 11 a.m. to hear from former Speaker Bill Blaikie and former acting clerk Marc Bosc, among others. The House Finance Committee, meanwhile, is scheduled to meet at 3 p.m. to hear from a range of witnesses, including Genome Canada and the Colleges and Institutes Canada.

The Human Resources Committee, meanwhile, will meet at 4 p.m. to hear from groups such as the Canadian Women’s Foundation and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada.

The Hill Times

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