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One new COVID case in the north, Haida Gwaii outbreak slowing down – Prince George Citizen

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One new case of COVID-19 has been reported in the Northern Health region on Thursday, on the same day that Northern Health reported there are no more active cases linked to the outbreak on Haida Gwaii.

In a joint statement released Thursday afternoon, B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and deputy provincial health officer Dr. Réka Gustafson said the total number of cases in the north since the start of the pandemic rose to 121. Data released by the B.C. Centre for Disease Control on Thursday showed there were 15 active cases in the Northern Health region.

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“Today, we are announcing 80 new cases for a total of 4,825 cases in British Columbia,” Dix and Gustafson said in their statement. “There are 780 active cases of COVID-19 in the province, 2,574 people who are under active public health monitoring as a result of identified exposure to known cases and 3,845 people who tested positive have recovered.”

Two additional people in the Fraser Health region died as a result of COVID-19 on Thursday, bringing the province’s death toll from the pandemic to 200.

“We offer our condolences to everyone who has lost their loved ones during the COVID-19 pandemic,” the statement said. “Currently, 11 individuals are hospitalized with COVID-19, four of whom are in intensive care. The remaining people with COVID-19 are recovering at home in self-isolation.”

Dix and Gustafson reported a new community outbreak in the province at Loblaws’ distribution centre in Surrey. Nine cases have been confirmed at the centre, and public health officials are screening employees on site and conducting contact tracing.

In an update on the Haida Gwaii outbreak, a statement issued by Northern Health said community outbreak measures remain in place on the islands.

“To date, there have been a total of 26 lab-confirmed cases related to the outbreak; as of today, all of the cases are now considered recovered, and there are no active cases,” the statement said. “Northern Health public health staff has followed up with numerous close contacts of lab-confirmed cases, and as of today all of those contacts have completed their self-isolation periods.”

Despite that, Northern Health is urging Haida Gwaii residents to monitor themselves for symptoms of COVID-19, and self-isolate and get tested if they show signs of illness.

“Public health officials will be monitoring the situation carefully over coming weeks and will declare the outbreak over when they are confident that chains of transmission have been stopped,” the statement said.

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The B.C. Centre for Disease was expected to release a map with a more-detailed breakdown on cases by region on Thursday evening. This story will be updated when that information is available.

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Doctors fear flu shot, PPE supply will lag: survey – mississauga.com

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Nevertheless, three quarters believed the health-care system was better prepared with COVID-19 resurgences than during the first wave.

The Public Health Agency of Canada said Tuesday it was preparing for the potential of simultaneous outbreaks of the flu and COVID-19.

The agency said provincial and territorial governments have ordered more than 13 million doses of vaccine — an increase from last season’s order of 11.2 million doses.


Collins says the CMA has been assured by public health officials there will be enough doses to meet demand but says they cannot predict what the uptake will be. Still, they encourage all Canadians to get the vaccine.

Each province and territorial government decides how much to purchase for their populations, where they are distributed and when to begin the rollout.

While this varies, many start their vaccination programs in October or early November.

In Ontario, Premier Doug Ford stressed multiple investments to bolster the health system as it attempts to address a backlog of surgeries while grappling with COVID-19 and the coming flu season.

“We put a billion dollars into testing and tracing, which is absolutely imperative. We also have the immunization program for the flu vaccine which is 5.1 million doses. That is the largest ever in Canadian history,” Ford said.

While virtual care has reduced in-person appointments, Collins said doctors still need to see some patients face-to-face.

In addition to PPE, she said each visit requires cleaning supplies to sanitize between visits and time and staff to do that work. Collins said that all costs money.

“Doctors need to know … that there’s a concerted effort to co-ordinate (resources) amongst those different bodies and to communicate clearly to physicians what is available and to support those physicians,” she said.

“There are people with all kinds of other health-care conditions that need to be seen, they need to be assessed. And so there needs to be protection for them, protection for the doctor seeing them.

“Because COVID is among us.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 29, 2020.

By Cassandra Szklarski, The Canadian Press

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Here is Minnesota's COVID-19 update for Tuesday, September 29 – Bring Me The News

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The death toll has reached 2,020.

Five more deaths has brought Minnesota’s COVID-19 death toll to 2,020. The newly reported deaths released by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) on Tuesday include one person each aged in their 60s, 70s and 80s, respectively, and two patients who were in their 90s. 

Of the 2,020 total deaths, 1,449 have been residents of long-term care, including two of the five newly reported cases Tuesday. 

Meanwhile, the number of COVID-19 patients currently hospitalized is unclear because the MDH stopped publicizing that data last Thursday. Instead, the MDH is only releasing new admissions to the hospital and ICU in its daily report, and on Tuesday it announced six new hospital admissions. There were also 20 new ICU admissions in Tuesday’s report. 

According to the state’s COVID-19 dashboard, the maximum ICU capacity of Minnesota’s hospitals is 2,158 – 1,071 of which are currently occupied (this is for all ailments, not just COVID-19). That’s an increase from 1,063 in Monday’s update. 

Tuesday’s update includes 817 new positive tests for the coronavirus, eight of which have been removed for an official count of 809 cases. Those positives are the result of 8,713 people tested, creating a 24-hour reporting period test positivity rate of 9.28%.

The positive test rate is lower from the perspective when the number of individuals producing positive tests (809) divided by total completed tests (15,257). In that case, the positivity rate is 5.30%.

The “tests completed” number is always higher than the “people tested” metric because some people get tested multiple times and those who test positive are only counted once, so it produces a less accurate positivity rate.

Coronavirus in Minnesota by the numbers:

  • Total tests: 2,017,350 (up from 2,003,115)
  • People tested: 1,406,578 (up from 1,397,865)
  • Positive cases: 98,447 (up from 97,638)
  • Deaths: 2,020 (up from 2,015) 
  • Hospitalized (cumulative): 7,633 (up from 7,627)
  • ICU admissions (cumulative: 2,129 (up from 2,109)
  • Patients no longer requiring isolation: 88,380 (up from 87,330)

There have also been 52 deaths where COVID-19 is listed by doctors as the “probable” cause, though it’s not included in the official COVID-19 death toll.

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105 new COVID-19 cases, 1 death as health officials urge B.C. to remember safety protocols – Golden Star

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B.C. reported 105 new COVID-19 cases and one death over the past 24 hours in a joint statement released by health officials Tuesday (Sept. 29).

In the statement, provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Deputy Health Minister Stephen Brown said there are currently 1,268 active cases, with 3,337 people under public health monitoring. Since the beginning of the pandemic, there have been 9,013 cases of COVID-19 and the death toll has reached 234. The most recent death was of a person in Fraser Health.

There are 69 people in hospital with the virus, 20 of whom are in ICU.

Officials said there is a new outbreak at Haro Park Centre long-term care facility in the Vancouver Coastal Health region, for a total of 14 health-care facilities with outbreaks at this time.

In their statement, health officials reminded British Columbians again that this fall will not look like that of years’ past.

“We have had to change our special celebrations and gatherings to keep the people we care about safe,” officials said. “This same approach is how we need to celebrate Thanksgiving this year. Rather than travelling to see friends or hosting a large family dinner, make it small this year and plan to connect virtually instead.”

The province also extended its state of emergency Tuesday, allowing the province to continue using its expanded powers under the Emergency Program Act. B.C. has been in a state of emergency since March due to the COVID-19 crisis.

ALSO READ: National child-care plan could help Canada rebound from COVID-induced economic crisis: prof

VIDEO: Ottawa unveils guidelines, deal for rapid COVID-19 tests as calls for approval mount


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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