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Politics Briefing: Atlantic premiers make the case for more health care funding from Ottawa – The Globe and Mail

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Hello,

Atlantic premiers are making the case for additional health care funding from the federal government ahead of a meeting next month of all premiers and territorial leaders where the issue will be key to the agenda.

“This increased funding would have a significant impact on the ability of provinces to provide quality health care services and respond to the strain on health care systems,” said the closing statement Wednesday for the meeting of the Council of Atlantic Premiers.

Nova Scotia Premier Tim Houston, chair of the Atlantic premiers council, hosted the meeting in Pictou, N.S. Present for the meeting were Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Andrew Furey, Dennis King of Prince Edward Island, and New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs.

The 13 provincial and territorial premiers in the Council of the Federation are to meet in Victoria on July 11 and 12. Premiers have said Ottawa should increase its contribution to the Canada Health Transfer by about $28-billion more this year.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said earlier this year that discussion on the issue should wait until the pandemic is over. He has said the federal government has spent the past two years engaging directly with provinces and territories on funding for health in addition to the Canada Health Transfer, which is worth $43.1-billion this year. Story here.

As B.C. Premier John Horgan, chair of the Council of the Federation, announced Tuesday that he would be stepping down as premier, he said that he remained committed to the health care funding issue and would work on it through to his expected departure from his post later this year.

“Premiers across the country will be assembling in Victoria, where the number one issue on the table is a commitment from the federal government to sit down with the provinces and resolve the crisis in public health care,” Mr. Horgan told a news conference in the B.C. capital.

“I fully intend to carry on that battle to make the federal government stand up for the commitments they made to all of us and convene a meeting so we can fix the most important social program, in fact, the most important program in Canada.”

Mr. Horgan, a New Democrat, said premiers and territorial leaders have been united across Canada on the issue despite partisan differences. “We have been a uniform group.”

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Ian Bailey. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

TIM HORTONS LATEST COMPANY TO SUSPEND HOCKEY CANADA SUPPORT – Tim Hortons is suspending its support of the IIHF World Junior Championship and plans to re-evaluate its sponsorship of Hockey Canada, as the organization faces growing backlash from corporate partners over its payment to settle allegations that eight Canadian Hockey League players assaulted a young woman in 2018 following a Hockey Canada gala. Story here.

$150M SETTLEMENT WITH PERDUE PHARMA CANADA – A proposed $150-million settlement with Purdue Pharma Canada covering all provinces and territories has been reached for the recovery of health care costs related to the sale and marketing of opioid-based pain medication. Story here.

RCMP COMMISSIONER BOWED TO POLITICAL PRESSURE: SENIOR CIVILIAN MOUNTIE – A senior civilian Mountie sent a strongly worded letter to RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki last year, accusing her of bowing to political pressure and displaying “unprofessional and extremely belittling” behaviour to officers investigating the worst mass shooting in Canadian history. Story here.

FIRST NATIONS CHIEFS GATHERING LOOMS – First Nations Chiefs from across Canada are set to gather in Vancouver next week, but along with discussions on issues ranging from climate change to housing and child welfare, they will also face an unfolding leadership crisis within their national advocacy organization. Story here.

CANADA OPENING FOUR NEW EMBASSIES – Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly says Canada will open four new embassies in Estonia, Lithuania, Slovakia and Armenia, and will reinforce its presence in Latvia amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Story here.

B.C. PREMIER QUITTING – John Horgan will step down as B.C. Premier this fall, saying two bouts of cancer and 36 years in government have left him without the intensity needed to commit to another term. Story here. Global News looks here at possible successors to Mr. Horgan, including former NDP MP Nathan Cullen.

‘I STABBED HIM IN THE FRONT’: JEAN ON TOPPLING KENNEY – Brian Jean is blunt about his efforts to see Jason Kenney ousted as leader of Alberta’s United Conservative Party, leading to the ongoing race to lead the party. “People that say I stabbed Kenney in the back, well, I never. I stabbed him in the front. He knew I was coming. I was very honest with him,” Mr. Jean, a candidate in the UCP leadership race, told The Edmonton Journal. Story here.

JUDGE IN CONVOY CASES THREATENED – One of the judges who presided over the court hearings of Freedom Convoy organizers is speaking out after receiving threats considered serious enough to require police intervention. Story here from CBC.

PMO POWER CENTRALIZATION NECESSARY: FORMER ADVISERS – The frequently criticized centralization of power within the Prime Minister’s Office is a necessary part of governing – regardless of who is in power – argued two former prime ministerial advisers, at an event in Calgary Tuesday. Story here from The National Post.

ALBERTA POSTS SURPLUS – Alberta posted a multi-billion-dollar surplus in the last fiscal year after a record windfall of energy revenue erased a forecasted deficit that motivated the government to cut spending. Story here.

CANADA LACKS AMBASSADOR TO CHINA – Canada has been without an ambassador to China since the end of 2021, when Dominic Barton moved out of the Beijing offices. The government says, while a representative will be named in “due course,” Canada continues to engage with China at the “highest levels” in the meantime. Story here from CTV.

SWEET TAX COMING IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR – Newfoundland and Labrador’s pending tax on soft drinks and other sugary beverages is leaving a bad taste with some in the province. The tax, which takes effect in September, will be a first in Canada. Story here from Global News.

TOUGH GREEN LEADERSHIP RULES DRAW COMPLAINTS- The contest to find the next Green Party leader is off to a rocky start, with leadership hopefuls and a former party insider complaining about the restrictive rules governing the race. Story here from CBC.

CYBERSPY AGENCY SOUGHT TO PROTECT ELECTION – Canada’s cyberspy agency launched a defensive operation to protect last year’s federal election – including the party leaders’ debate – from disruption by foreign agencies. Story here from CTV.

INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE NEEDS TO BE DECLARED EPIDEMIC: INQUEST JURY – The Ontario government should formally declare intimate partner violence an epidemic, says an inquest jury after three weeks of testimony into a rural triple femicide nearly seven years ago. Story here.

CONSERVATIVE LEADERSHIP RACE

CAMPAIGN TRAIL – Scott Aitchison is in Ontario. Patrick Brown is in Brampton. Jean Charest is in Alberta. Leslyn Lewis is in her riding of Halimand-Norfolk. Pierre Poilievre is in Ottawa. There was no word on the campaign whereabouts of Roman Baber.

BROWN CALLS FOR CONSERVATIVE CLARITY ON ABORTION – Patrick Brown says the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on abortion means the Conservative Party in Canada needs to emphasize it is ruling out changes to policies on terminating pregnancies. Story here.

BROWN AND MACKAY BREAKFAST – Patrick Brown is scheduled to attend a breakfast event in Stellarton, Nova Scotia on Sunday with former Conservative cabinet minister Peter MacKay, also a contender for the party leadership in 2020. However, an endorsement is unlikely. In a statement this week, Mr. MacKay said he is doing what he can to support all candidates, but not picking a favorite.

THIS AND THAT

The House of Commons is not sitting again until Sept. 19. The Senate is to resume sitting on Sept. 20

FREELAND IN SHERBROOKE – Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland is in Sherbrooke, visiting footwear manufacturer LP Royer and workers. She was also scheduled to meet with workers and hold a news conference. She will also meet with the Sherbrooke Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

MENDICINO IN SCARBOROUGH – Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino is in Scarborough to make an announcement with Toronto Mayor John Tory on federal support for organizations on the front lines of the fight against gun and gang violence in Toronto.

MILLER IN N.W.T AND HAJDU IN THUNDER BAY – In Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Marc Miller announces a project under the Cultural Spaces in Indigenous Communities Program. Meanwhile, in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Indigenous Services Minister Patty Hajdu announces support to enhance tourism and expand Northwestern Ontario’s creative economy.

ALGHABRA IN MISSISSAGUA – Transport Minister Omar Alghabra, and NAV CANADA vice president Mark Cooper, in Mississauga, will make an important funding announcement regarding investments in air traffic control infrastructure in Canada.

SUTCLIFFE RUNS FOR OTTAWA MAYOR – Writer, broadcaster and podcaster Mark Sutcliffe, the founder of the Ottawa Business Journal, and the former executive editor of The Ottawa Citizen newspaper, has entered the mayoral race in Ottawa. Jim Watson, who has been mayor since 2010 after serving a previous three-year term, is not seeking re-election. There are now a total eight candidates in the Oct. 24 election. I will work hard, every single day, to make Ottawa safe, reliable, and affordable for everyone,” he said in a tweet Wednesday.

THE DECIBEL

Wednesday’s edition of The Globe and Mail podcast features Rosemary Westwood, who has been following the battle over abortion rights in the Southern U.S. for the past six years. She’s the host of Banned, a podcast about the Mississippi case that led to the overturning of Roe v. Wade. She’s on the show to explain how the U.S. got to this point, the people behind the fight on both sides of the issue and what their plans are now that Roe v. Wade is gone. The Decibel is here.

PRIME MINISTER’S DAY

In Madrid for a NATO summit, the Prime Minister held private meetings, and participated in the official arrivals at the summit, met with the Secretary General of NATO,Jens Stoltenberg and Denmark’s Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen, and attended the official summit welcome ceremony by Secretary-General Stoltenberg. The Prime Minister also participated in the Opening Session of the North Atlantic Council Meeting, and met with Sweden’s Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson and Finland’s President Sauli Niinistö. After that, the Prime Minister participated in the North Atlantic Council Plenary Session, and attended the Transatlantic Working Dinner, chaired by the Prime Minister of Spain, Pedro Sánchez.

LEADERS

No schedules provided for party leaders.

OPINION

Gary Mason (The Globe and Mail) on how John Horgan’s power as B.C.’s NDP Premier was his ability to connect with ordinary people:There will be other opportunities to discuss Mr. Horgan’s legacy. But without question, he will go down as one of the top two or three most popular premiers in B.C. history. He had the Irish gift of gab, combined with a common touch that made him highly relatable – a guy with whom you wouldn’t mind having a pint. That’s not something you teach; you’re born with those skills. It’s funny when you consider he almost talked himself out of going for the job.”

Rosemary Westwood (Contributed to The Globe and Mail) on how the U.S. has demolished abortion rights: “On the day the decision came down, former vice-president Mike Pence – the man whose evangelical bona fides helped affirm the religious right’s support of Mr. Trump – tweeted that Republicans “must not rest and must not relent until the sanctity of life is restored to the center of American law in every state in the land.” It took half a century for the anti-abortion movement to take down Roe, and its work may not be finished. The question now is whether the abortion-rights movement can mount an expansive, well-funded, enduring movement of even greater force to restore women’s rights – and how fast.”

Jake Enright (The National Post) on the truth behind skyrocketing Conservative party membership sales: Finally, and for me most significantly, each of the three Conservative leadership front-runners are communicating to a unique audience, using a specific medium they themselves dominate. For example, Patrick Brown is primarily communicating to ethnic communities, using cultural media and outreach. Jean Charest is communicating to disillusioned progressive conservatives, using traditional media to reach his audience, especially in Quebec. Lastly, Pierre Poilievre is communicating to the “Left Behinds,” an audience that feels they are falling further and further behind financially, who also do not trust the government and are becoming suspicious of institutions. Poilievre is using his mastery of social media to reach this once illusive political audience. Leslyn Lewis is also communicating to a specific audience, the pro-life community.”

Marjory LeBreton (Policy Magazine) on the Conservative Party’s Make-or-break Moment: Now, I fervently believe that the Conservative Party has reached an existential choice. The current leadership race is the third in six years, and the message that sends to Canadians in general cannot go unheard by Conservatives in particular: We have to get it right this time. I fear that if we don’t, the great accommodation reached by Stephen Harper and Peter MacKay in the fall of 2003 could fracture, possibly beyond repair. Clearly, this trend cannot continue if we are serious about earning the support of Canadians in future elections.”

Got a news tip that you’d like us to look into? E-mail us at tips@globeandmail.com. Need to share documents securely? Reach out via SecureDrop.

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Opinion: What started in Kansas upends American politics – CNN

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Sign up to get this weekly column as a newsletter. We’re looking back at the strongest, smartest opinion takes of the week from CNN and other outlets.

(CNN)In “The Wizard of Oz,” a tornado sends Dorothy and her Kansas home spinning into the “Merry Old Land of Oz.” Last week it was what Politico called a “political earthquake” in Kansas that sent the national debate over abortion into a new phase with many unknowns.

For decades, the anti-abortion movement worked to overturn the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling that established a national right to abortion. But their long-sought goal, finally achieved in June, may turn out to be a case of “be careful what you wish for.” By a vote of 59% to 41%, the people of Kansas rejected an amendment to the state constitution that would have eliminated the right to an abortion.
“It’s a huge victory for abortion rights,” wrote Jill Filipovic. “The result in Kansas confirms that Americans simply do not want an extreme anti-abortion movement regulating women’s bodies. Kansans have said what most Americans believe: abortion is an issue best left to women and their doctors.”
But she added that this was a vote which should never have happened. “Fundamental rights — and it doesn’t get more fundamental than sovereignty over one’s own body — should not be up for a vote, even if the righteous side is likely to win,” Filipovic argued.
Writing for Politico, John F. Harris suggested that the vote in Kansas, along with others that may follow, could scramble the legacy of Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito, who wrote the majority opinion overturning Roe. He may go down in history as the “the justice who facilitated a national consensus on behalf of abortion rights. Quite unintentionally, today’s hero of the ‘pro-life’ movement could end up being a giant of the ‘pro-choice’ movement.”
Tuesday’s vote in Kansas, which “mirrors polling showing solid majorities of people supported leaving Roe v. Wade intact, suggests that opponents of legal abortion do better when the prospect of an abortion ban is hypothetical, while abortion-rights supporters do better when the issue is tangibly real,” wrote Harris.
A moderate Republican, former Rep. Charlie Dent, noted that “the overturning of Roe v. Wade has energized a previously demoralized Democratic base and could galvanize college educated suburban women in particular … If the GOP can’t win an abortion fight in Kansas, imagine the difficulty it will face in swing states like Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.”
“Coupled with Trump’s stolen election obsession, mass shootings and a growing number of extreme GOP candidates in competitive races, the unpopularity of the Roe decision may mitigate Democratic losses in November, despite vulnerabilities on a number of other fronts (namely, the economy).”
Dent also faulted Democrats for running ads that backed extreme, election-denying candidates in the GOP primaries in the hope that Democratic candidates could more easily defeat them in the general election. In Michigan, “the courageous freshman Congressman Peter Meijer, who voted to impeach Trump just days after being sworn into Congress, fell to an election-denying candidate, John Gibbs, a former Trump administration official who was backed by the former President,” Dent wrote.
The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee spent more than $300,000 on ads touting Gibbs’ “conservatism and fidelity to Trump,” wrote Dent. “I’m sure plenty of Democratic operatives are cackling over their success meddling in the GOP primary, but any smugness may turn into deep regret if Gibbs ends up prevailing in November. Those who play with fire often get burned.

For more:
Mary Ziegler and Elizabeth Sepper: The coming state-federal showdown over abortion

Nancy Pelosi drops in

China fired off missiles, flew jets into Taiwan’s air defense identification zone and called off talks with the US on issues such as climate change and military relations. The reason: US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi visited Taiwan, which China sees as part of its territory.
While Pelosi’s visit sparked apocalyptic warnings and fevered headlines, Taiwanese-American journalist Clarissa Wei wrote that the people of Taiwan are mostly unfazed. “What’s most frustrating about the reaction to Pelosi’s visit is not the prophetic declaration of imminent doom, but the expectation of fear and the surprise that follows when people realize that we aren’t all panicking in Taiwan — as if the calm we exude in light of unprecedented threats is a symptom of our ignorance of the facts before us.”
Threats from China are nothing new. They have been a part of my life, my parents’ lives and their parents’ lives for as long as almost anyone in my family can remember. In fact, Taiwan has been under threat by the People’s Republic of China for nearly 70 years. The three Taiwan Strait crises are proof of that.”

Alex Jones

A Texas jury ordered incendiary radio host Alex Jones to pay a combined $49.3 million in compensatory and punitive damages to the parents of a child killed in the Sandy Hook school shooting 10 years ago. Jones’ legal troubles aren’t over by any means: he faces two more such trials.
One of the parents, Scarlett Lewis, even had to testify that her son “Jesse was real. I’m a real mom.”
“It’s an unthinkable statement for a grief-stricken parent to have to make,” wrote Nicole Hemmer, “testifying that her 6-year-old son, murdered while he sat in school, had actually lived, and that she was the woman who had given birth to him and raised him for the too-few years he was alive. But that was the testimony Scarlett Lewis gave this week at a hearing to determine damages against Alex Jones, a conspiracy theorist and media personality.”

“After 20 children and six adults were murdered at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012, Jones began to spin lurid conspiracies that the shootings never happened and that the shattered families were simply actors. The conspiracy triggered years of harassment as conspiracists targeted the mourning parents, who have had to hire security to protect themselves.”
But as Hemmer noted, Jones is not a lone fringe player in the media world. He is “part of the right-wing power structure, from his interviews with soon-to-be president Donald Trump to his alleged role as an organizer at the January 6 insurrection.”
“More than that, many in the Republican Party and conservative movement increasingly sound like Jones, with talk of false flags, crisis actors and pedophile rings now a mainstay of right-wing rhetoric. And while the Trump presidency opened the door for the mainstreaming of Jones, it’s important to understand how ripe the GOP was for Alex Jonesification.
In Dallas, the Conservative Political Action Conference gave a warm welcome to Hungary’s autocratic Prime Minister Viktor Orban.
“The audience cheered him on during his blistering attacks on abortion, immigration, LGBTQ rights and more,” Julian Zelizer observed.
“The illiberal and anti-democratic elements of Republican politics, which flared during the Trump presidency, are alive and well. As Orban’s popularity indicates, the profoundly anti-democratic strains that have been shaping the GOP keep getting stronger, not weaker…”
“The talk comes on the same week that several election deniers, as well as participants in the January 6 insurrection, won in the primaries. The assault on the 2020 election continues to be a unifying theme in Republican circles. Even if some Republican voters are tiring of Trump, his rallying cry animates much of the electorate.

Terrorist leader killed

Eleven years after then-President Barack Obama announced the killing of terrorist leader Osama bin Laden in a US raid, President Joe Biden described the tracking down and elimination of bin Laden’s former associate, Ayman al-Zawahiri.
“The airstrike that killed al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri over the weekend in Afghanistan is part of the long and justified campaign by the United States to bring all the heads of the terror group to justice,” wrote Peter Bergen.
Still, some of the claims about al-Zawahiri’s impact were overblown. “While Zawahiri was influential in the very early years of al Qaeda in turning bin Laden against the regimes in the Middle East, he wasn’t involved in bin Laden’s most important strategic decisions — that is, turning him against the US and planning 9/11. And Zawahiri proved to be an incompetent leader of al Qaeda when he took over the group more than a decade ago.”
Bergen added, “Zawahiri was not a charismatic leader of al Qaeda in the mold of Osama bin Laden. Instead, he had all the charisma of a boring uncle given to long, arcane monologues, someone that you would best avoid sitting next to at Thanksgiving dinner.”

Families in turmoil

Guy Reffitt was sentenced to more than seven years in prison, the longest penalty meted out so far to insurrectionists who took part in the January 6, 2021, attack on the US Capitol. His son Jackson Reffitt had reported his father to the FBI on Christmas Eve 2020.
“The Reffitts’ story is tragic, but hardly unique,” observed SE Cupp. “Chances are, you probably do know someone who’s been sucked into the cult of Trumpism, as Guy was.
“Maybe it’s an aunt or uncle posting about rigged elections on Facebook, spreading Trump’s lie that the election was stolen…
“Maybe it’s a father, or a mother, or a brother, who’s gone down a QAnon rabbit hole of conspiracy theories, and is no longer attached to reality.”
“The carnage from Trump’s divisive rhetoric, lies, and conspiracy theories is incalculable. Trumpism is a powerful drug, one that can even cause a father to threaten his own child.
This was, incidentally, all by design. Trump stoked the fears and grievances of his base, turned Americans against each other, spread lies and conspiracy theories, undermined our faith in democratic institutions — all so that he could keep his supporters rabid, angry, willing to do whatever he asked. And sadly, many of them did.”
For more:

Bill Russell and Nichelle Nichols

On and off the field, Bill Russell was a leader. On and off the screen, Nichelle Nichols was an inspirational role model. Both died last weekend.
Peniel Joseph recalled Russell’s contributions as an athlete and a crusader against racism. “Russell was a 6-foot-10 center whose defensive prowess, rebounding skills and all-around leadership propelled the Celtics to 11 titles in 13 years,” Joseph wrote. “As if appearing in a news reel of the most significant events of the civil rights era, he was present, time and again, at key moments for the movement, from the March on Washington in 1963 to his visit to Mississippi that same year following the assassination of civil rights leader Medgar Evers…”
Over the years, he never lost his willingness to call out racism, or a perceived indifference to it. In recent years, he chided White Americans for their incredulity — in the aftermath of George Floyd’s murder and the racial and political reckoning that followed — about the existence of systemic racism.”
When “Star Trek” premiered in 1966, one of the cast members “was the cool, sultry, supremely self-possessed Lt. Nyota Uhura, played by Nichelle Nichols, still a relative newcomer to television,” Gene Seymour recalled. In an era when the civil rights movement achieved its biggest successes, Nichols’ role had a symbolic significance. Yet “she was discouraged by her lines being cut from some of the episodes and was ready to move on to the Broadway stage. And she would have left if she hadn’t met a die-hard ‘Trek’ fan at an NAACP fundraiser in Hollywood: the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.”
King “told her that he and his family enjoyed watching ‘Trek’ and rooted for her playing a non-stereotypical Black character. She thanked him but said she was on her way out,” Seymour wrote.
“‘You cannot and must not!'” Nichols recalled King saying in her autobiography. “‘Don’t you realize how important your presence, your character is? Don’t you see? This is not a Black role, and this is not a female role… You have broken ground. For the first time, the world sees us as we should be seen, as equals, as intelligent people — as we should be.'”
Nichols stayed with the show for its remaining two seasons and later would embrace “her importance as an inspiration and role model for young Black people whose dreams of space science and travel were emboldened by her character’s futuristic adventures.”

Don’t miss

AND…

Lizzo and Beyoncé heard her

It’s no easy task — getting the attention of two of the world’s biggest music superstars. And even more impressive, getting them to make changes in their work.
Yet Hannah Diviney, a disability activist in Australia, accomplished just that.
She called out Lizzo and Beyoncé on Twitter for including an offensive term referring to her disability in recent albums. Both artists soon responded and revised their songs’ lyrics.
“Words matter,” Diviney wrote. “They always have and they always will. Language is one of the few tools in the world most people can wield with ease and on social media even more so. That’s why it’s worth paying attention to how we use it. That’s why my mom always taught me the pen was mightier than the sword. If anything, this week has taught me that thanks to social media and the power of a well-crafted tweet, we have access to the mightiest pens of all. And that’s why I hope we can use this global attention to have bigger conversations about the inequalities disabled people face. From little things, big things grow.”

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Tory leadership hopefuls say it’s time for unity. Here’s what some say that means

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OTTAWA — When three Conservative leadership hopefuls met this past week for a debate, the same word kept getting repeated.

Unity. Or more precisely, the need for it.

In a contest largely seen as a battle for the party’s soul, which has put decades-old fissures on display between groups that make up its very coalition, what might it take to achieve unity after results are revealed Sept. 10?

As that question lingers, many in the party and beyond are preparing for a scenario in which Pierre Poilievre takes victory.

Much of that thinking is based on the longtime MP’s popularity with the existing grassroots, coupled with his ability to draw big crowds and sell what his campaign claims to have been more than 300,000 memberships.

But after winning comes the challenge of leading.

“Somebody has to give some thought to the morning after,” said Garry Keller, former chief of staff to Rona Ambrose, who served as the party’s interim leader after it lost government in 2015.

Of the 118 other members in caucus, a whopping 62 endorsed Poilievre. That’s compared to the party’s 2020 leadership race when the caucus was more evenly split between Peter MacKay and the eventual winner, Erin O’Toole.

O’Toole’s inability to manage caucus after losing the 2021 election to the Liberals ultimately led to his downfall. He was forced out by a vote from his MPs under provisions in the Reform Act, measures which will remain in place for the next leader.

Poilievre has said his campaign message of “freedom” serves as a great unifier among Conservatives. However, Keller said if some in caucus are taking that to mean they will be able to say whatever they want on social media, they shouldn’t.

“I think people will be solely disabused of that notion.”

Poilievre and his supporters have throughout the race been accused of sowing disunity in the party by instigating personal attacks against rivals, namely ex-Quebec premier Jean Charest. 

Most recently, MPs endorsing Poilievre — along with Scott Aitchison, a rural Ontario representative and fellow leadership competitor — have called into question whether Charest, who has spent the past 20 years out of federal politics, plans to stick around the party after the race is over.

Longtime British Columbia MP Ed Fast, a co-chair on Charest’s campaign, tweeted “the purity tests must stop” and cautioned party members that when Conservatives are divided, Liberals win.

Fast himself resigned from his role as finance critic after criticizing Poilievre’s vow to fire the Bank of Canada governor, which ruffled some feathers inside caucus.

“It’s a sad situation that Jean Charest, a patriot and champion of Canadian unity, continues to have his loyalty questioned by party members looking to stoke division,” said Michelle Coates Mather, a spokeswoman for his campaign.

“What’s the endgame here exactly? Lose the next federal election by alienating Conservative members who support Charest? Seems a poor strategy for a party looking to expand their base and win a federal election.”

While Poilievre enjoys the majority support of the party’s caucus, most of the party’s 10 Quebec MPs are backing Charest, opening the question of what happens next if he is not successful.

Asked recently about that possibility, MP Alain Rayes, who is organizing on Charest’s campaign, expressed confidence in the former Quebec premier’s chances, saying the party doesn’t need “American-style divisive politics.”

“I’m deeply convinced that our members will make the right choice,” he said in a statement.

The group Centre Ice Conservatives, a centre-right advocacy group formed during the leadership race, contends the party has room to grow if it leaves the fringes and concentrates on issues that matter in the mainstream.

Director Michael Stuart says both Charest and Poilievre have policies that speak to the centrists, and what they’re hearing from supporters of their group is a desire for more focus on “dinner table issues,” such as economic growth and jobs.

“There’s a lot of distraction with noise around vaccines and the convoy and those sorts of things.”

Not only did Poilievre support the “Freedom Convoy,” he used his message of “freedom” to campaign on the anger and frustration people felt because of government-imposed COVID-19 rules, like vaccine and mask mandates.

How he will handle social conservatives also remains an open question.

Poilievre has pledged no government led by him would introduce or pass legislation restricting abortion access.

Jack Fonseca, director of political operations for the anti-abortion group Campaign Life Coalition, said many of those who strongly oppose vaccine mandates also share values with social conservatives.

“They are largely pro-freedom, pro-family, and yes, even pro-life and pro-faith,” he said.

Social conservatives have traditionally been a well-mobilized part of the party’s base during leadership contests and helped deliver wins for O’Toole and former leader Andrew Scheer, who is now helping Poilievre in the race.

While Fonseca and other anti-abortion groups are encouraging members to pick social conservative candidate Leslyn Lewis as their first choice, he said the “freedom conservatives” Poilievre recruited will expect results.

That includes giving Lewis a critic role, he said.

“He will be forced to face that reality and to deliver policy commitments to the freedom conservatives and social conservatives that are his base.”

“If it doesn’t, the peril is you become a flip-flopper like Erin O’Toole,” he said, referring to walk-backs the former leader made on promises after winning the leadership.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 7, 2022.

 

Stephanie Taylor, The Canadian Press

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Former B.C. solicitor-general Rich Coleman is returning to politics – Terrace Standard

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Two years after he retired, former B.C. Solicitor-General Rich Coleman is returning to politics, this time at the municipal level, with the “Elevate Langley Voters Association” civic party in the Township of Langley, according to an Elections B.C. register of elector organizations.

The register lists former Langley East MLA Coleman as the “authorized principal official” for the party.

While he has registered a civic party, whether Coleman will be running in the Oct. 15 election himself remains to be seen.

In a response to a Langley Advance Times query on Saturday, Aug. 6, Coleman confirmed he has been approached about running for mayor, but hasn’t decided yet.

“A lot of people have been on me to run for mayor,” Coleman told the Langley Advance Times.

“I’m seriously considering it.”

Coleman said he registered the Elevate Langley party when he did, because the Election B.C. deadline to register elector organizations for the pending municipal elections was Aug. 2, and he wanted to provide a vehicle for some potential Township candidates he has been mentoring.

“I’ve got some young folks who want to run,” Coleman said.

READ ALSO: VIDEO: B.C. Liberal MLA Rich Coleman announced retirement after six terms

In the Elections B.C. register entry, Elevate Langley listed a contact phone number that turned out to be the office number for current Langley East MLA Megan Dykeman, who said she has no involvement with the party, calling it “absolutely an error.”

Coleman said he would check into it.

In 2018, Coleman was considering a run for Surrey mayor, but decided against it.

Coleman spent 24 years in provincial politics before he retired in 2020, including four years as provincial Solicitor-General.

Langley Township councillors Eric Woodward and Blair Whitmarsh have also announced mayoralty bids. So has former councillor Michelle Sparrow.

Elections B.C.’s register of civic parties listed Woodward as the principal official for the “Contract with Langley Association” party, which, the filing indicates, will be fielding candidates for council and school board.

READ ALSO: Woodward announces run for mayor of Langley Township

READ ALSO: Whitmarsh announces run for Langley Township mayor’s seat

READ ALSO: Sparrow joins race for Langley Township mayor’s seat


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