Connect with us

Media

Prince Rupert doctor amends social media statement on COVID-19 – Prince Rupert Northern View

Published

on


After an original social media post on April 7 which announced Prince Rupert’s first confirmed presumptive COVID-19 case, Dr. Marius Pienaar has amended the post to reflect a more generalized comment, and deleted all reference to specific local diagnoses or patient circumstance.

Many in Prince Rupert applauded and praised Dr. Pienaar’s stance in vocalizing the current COVID-19 situation in the City, while the College of Physicians and Surgeons British Columbia held a different position.

READ MORE: UPDATE: First presumptive case of COVID-19 in Prince Rupert

“The College has recently learned of instances where information has been posted on social media or provided to the press about individual patient cases and test results, including the identification of certain smaller communities. This is not acceptable,” the CPSBC said on its website with an undisclosed posting date or time.

“Physicians must not disclose information about individual patients in any setting, including stories shared directly with other people, even if patient identities are not revealed. The risk of a privacy breach is too great.”

“In the event of a complaint from an affected patient, a breach of this nature may be considered unprofessional conduct,” the College said.

Pienaar said in his original Facebook post on April 7,

“Dear Citizens of PR. Finally IT has happened. COVID is here!

Every community, including ours, has to act as if it already has cases.

This is a reminder to keep following the recommended rules re Covid. (Wash your hands. Stay at home. Keep a safe distance. etc.) And with the long weekend looming, please do not welcome visitors, family or otherwise, and stay isolated at home. The virus is here, amongst us. Now is not the time to relax our vigilance,” Pienaar said in the original post.

The College said that during this unprecedented situation the COVID-19 pandemic, many people are anxious to hear the latest news about COVID-19, especially about the number of cases and the extraordinary steps that the public need take to prevent further spread.

READ MORE: COMMENTARY: Knowing where COVID-19 cases are does not protect you

The amended post by Pienaar now has all reference to the patient or the patient’s condition removed.

“Dear Citizens of PR. Finally IT has happened. COVID is here!

Every community, including ours, has to act as if it already has cases.

This is a reminder to keep following the recommended rules re Covid. (Wash your hands. Stay at home. Keep a safe distance. etc.) And with the long weekend looming, please do not welcome visitors, family or otherwise, and stay isolated at home. The virus is here, amongst us. Now is not the time to relax our vigilance,” Pienaar said in the amended post.

“The College has been working closely with Dr. Bonnie Henry and her office to ensure timely messages are delivered to physicians. As the provincial health officer, Dr. Henry is in constant touch with her national counterparts, the Ministry of Health and the health authorities, and is therefore the most qualified spokesperson to provide British Columbians with factual and timely updates about COVID-19. During her updates, Dr. Henry is taking great care to ensure the privacy of individuals who are affected, which of course is of utmost importance,” the College website said.

“Please follow the guidance of the provincial health officer and refrain from adding to the confusion and anxiety by posting alarming messages or storytelling,” CPSBC said,”Patients should be obtaining the latest and most up-to-date information from Dr. Henry’s daily news conferences and the BC Centre for Disease Control website.”

Calls from the The Northern View to the CPSBC and Dr. Pienaar have not been immediately returned.


 
K-J Millar | Journalist 
Send K-J email
Like the The Northern View on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won’t find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Media

Media Beat: August 10, 2020 | FYIMusicNews – FYI Music News

Published

on


The latest from Ad Contrarian Bob Hoffman

A lot has happened since I began my self-imposed exile last month.  

   – Most fun of all was the Congressional puppet show in which some of the world’s most wealthy bullshit artists tested their bullshitting skills against some the world’s most pompous bullshit artists. Everyone lost.

   – Facebook beat the ad industry in the July “ad boycott” war by a score of 100 to 0. This means we’ll get token changes at the social network and another disreputable election.

  – From Wired this week: “If you really want to follow the money behind online hate and disinformation, you have to understand programmatic display advertising.” Bingo!

   – The ad industry has felt pretty comfortable ignoring the feckless GDPR and CCPA. But now that Apple and Google are taking steps to do something about the scourge of third party tracking, the industry is getting nervous. At the instigation of the ANA, they have created an association that includes major advertisers and trade associations (excluding Apple and Google.) It is pompously called the “Partnership for Responsible Addressable Media.” It should be called the “Conspiracy for Sanitized Surveillance.”

Stu Jeffries: Mornings on Boom 97.3

You definitely remember Stu Jeffries from Good Rockin’ Tonight if you watched CBC between 1985-1993. His radio path is the kind of stuff dreams are made of. At one point he was told he was no longer wanted but just fill in until we find someone. Turns out he was the person after all. He hosts mornings on Boom 97.3 in Toronto and you can hear his enthusiasm for radio which started way back in Winnipeg in the 70’s listening to stations like CFRW. – Matt Cundill, SoundOff Media Co.

BCE reports Q2 results

BCE operating revenue was $5,354 million, down 9.1% compared to Q2 2019, due to reduced consumer and commercial activity as COVID-19 negatively impacted financial results across all Bell operating segments. This was comprised of 7.5% lower service revenue of $4,800 million and 20.7% lower product revenue of $554 million.

  Total media operating revenue decreased by 31.2% to $579 million due to lower year-over-year advertising and subscriber revenues.

  Advertising revenue declined materially on reduced advertiser spending across all platforms – TV, radio, out of home and digital, due to the impact of COVID-19 on commercial activity, the suspension of major league sports schedules and the cancellation of other live events. – BCE earnings report

Canadian Assoc. of Journalists corrects Global layoff numbers

In a news release, With Global layoffs, Canadians losing out on vital journalism during Covid 19, issued 23-Jul-2020 by Canadian Association of Journalists over PR Newswire, “we are advised by the company that several changes were made. Furthermore, the original version of this press release stated that Global had laid off 70 journalists from across its operations. Global claims that number is incorrect but declined to say how many people were laid off. The complete, corrected release follows … – Canada News Wire

CAB seeks new president

At a time when it’s looking to revitalize its organization in the face of many challenges facing broadcasters, the Canadian Association of Broadcasters (CAB) is looking for a new president to be a strong voice in Ottawa and a tireless advocate for the country’s broadcasting industry. The CAB’s de facto president Sylvie Bissonnette (officially the association’s CFO and vice-president of finance and administration) is retiring in November. The job ad for the new president’s position is posted here on Cartt.ca. Bilingualism is a mandatory requirement for this national role. Executive search firm Boyden is assisting the CAB … CARTT (subscription needed)

An MPE player webinar for Canadian radio

In this webinar Play MPE consultant Stephanie Friedman covers the Player’s main functionalities, new additions and shares tips for best practices.

[embedded content]

Jordan Bitove and Paul Rivett explain how they came to buy Torstar and what they hope to do next

“Our goal is to change the conversation. Give journalists the tools to do the job. It can’t be fun coming in there every day wondering, is this the day they shut off the lights? Who’s being fired today? It’s about giving support and a vision for where we’re going, which I think has been lacking,’’ Bitove says. – Rosie DiManno, The Star

This moon landing news report is a fake

The MIT’s Center for Advanced Virtuality created the false Nixon video using an A.I. app that combines real footage with an actor’s reading of an unused speech that was actually prepared in case tragedy struck. The video, titled In the Event of Moon Disaster, was cooked up last year, but the MIT team put it online this week to mark the 51st anniversary of the July 20, 1969 moon landing.

The MIT team says it’s meant to serve as a warning of the coming wave of impressively realistic deepfake false videos about to hit us that use A.I. to convincingly reproduce the appearance and sound of real people (you may remember this deepfake of former President Obama from a few years ago). –– Aaron Pressman, Fortune Data Sheet

[embedded content]

Noteworthy

Jeff Bezos Sells One Million Amazon Shares Worth $3.1 Billion

Forbes’ first-ever list of TikTok’s highest-paid stars

Roku loss grows despite 65% streaming hours hike

Nielsen reports Q2 loss

How the media is preparing for an election night that could go on for weeks

Spotify still has a long runway ahead

Here’s how much money Disney’s Star Wars films actually earned the Mouse House

In a State of Emergency, the President can control your phone, your TV, and even your light switches

News Corp seeks ‘carriage fees’ from Google, Facebook in Australia

Joey Zhang’s phone number links her to the fake rally in support of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai arrested under security law – Powell River Peak

Published

on


Hong Kong authorities broadened their enforcement of a new national security law on Monday, arresting media tycoon Jimmy Lai, searching the headquarters of his Next Digital group and carting away boxes of what they said was evidence.

Two days after Chinese and Hong Kong officials shrugged off sanctions imposed on them by the U.S., the moves showed China’s determination to enforce the new law and curb dissent in the semi-autonomous city after months of massive pro-democracy demonstrations last year.

article continues below

The police action marked the first time the law was used against news media, stoking fears that authorities are suppressing press freedom. Next Digital operates Apple Daily, a feisty pro-democracy tabloid that often condemns China’s Communist Party government. Last year, the newspaper frequently urged readers to take part in the anti-government protests.

Hong Kong police arrested Lai on Monday morning, an aide to the businessman said, in the highest-profile detention under the new law since it took effect in late June. Lai, 71, is an outspoken pro-democracy figure who regularly criticizes China’s authoritarian rule and Hong Kong’s government.

Mark Simon, a Next Digital executive and Lai’s aide, said Lai was charged with collusion with foreign powers. He said police searched the homes of Lai and his son and detained several other members of the media company.

Hong Kong police said they arrested at least nine people between the ages of 23 and 72 on suspicion of violating the new security law, with offences including collusion with a foreign country and conspiracy to defraud. They did not release the names of those arrested or provide further details of the charges.

Following Lai’s arrest, about 200 police raided Next Digital’s headquarters, cordoning off the area, searching desks and at times getting into heated exchanges with staff. What police were looking for in the building wasn’t clear, although they later said they took away 25 boxes of evidence for processing.

Lai, who was arrested at his mansion in Kowloon in the morning, was also brought to the headquarters of Next Digital, where he remained for about two and a half hours before police took him away in a car.

“We are completely shocked by what’s happening now, with the arrest and followed by the ongoing raid inside the headquarters of Next Digital,” said Chris Yeung, chairman of the Hong Kong Journalists Association.

“With the passage of the national security law and the really tough powers given to the police in their operations, we have seen now what we call ‘white terror’ become a reality, which will affect media organizations and journalists’ reporting.”

Police unblocked Next Digital’s headquarters at mid-afternoon, with senior superintendent of police Steve Li saying that staff were free to resume their work.

The share price of Next Digital soared over 200% in the afternoon, following posts on a popular online forum encouraging investors to support the company by buying its stock.

The reason for the charge against Lai wasn’t clear.

In May, shortly after Beijing announced its intention to pass the national security law for Hong Kong, Lai condemned the legislation in a series of tweets. The state-owned newspaper Global Times called the tweets “evidence of subversion.”

Lai also wrote an op-ed in the New York Times in May stating that China was repressing Hong Kong with the legislation.

“I have always thought I might one day be sent to jail for my publications or for my calls for democracy in Hong Kong,” Lai wrote. “But for a few tweets, and because they are said to threaten the national security of mighty China? That’s a new one, even for me.”

Lai was earlier arrested in February and April for allegedly participating in unauthorized protests last year. He also faces charges of joining an unauthorized vigil on June 4 marking the anniversary of Beijing’s crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square in 1989.

Last year, Lai met U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at the White House to discuss a controversial bill — since withdrawn — that would have allowed criminal suspects in Hong Kong to be sent to mainland China for trial.

But Hong Kong officials have said the security law, which took effect June 30, would not be applied retroactively. The law is widely seen as a means to curb dissent after anti-government protests rocked the semi-autonomous city for months last year.

The legislation outlaws secessionist, subversive and terrorist acts, as well as collusion with foreign forces in the city’s internal affairs. The maximum punishment for serious offenders is life imprisonment.

Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council condemned the arrests in a statement, saying they were a tool for the Chinese Communist Party’s “political cleansing and hegemonic expansion.” It said the law is being abused to suppress freedom of speech, press freedom and the civil rights of Hong Kong people.

Last month, Chinese state broadcaster CCTV said pro-democracy activist Nathan Law and five others were wanted under the law, although all six had fled overseas. Law relocated to Britain in July to continue international advocacy work for Hong Kong.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai arrested, newsroom searched – Pique Newsmagazine

Published

on


Hong Kong police arrested media tycoon Jimmy Lai and raided the publisher’s headquarters Monday in the highest-profile use yet of a new national security law Beijing imposed on the city in June.

“Jimmy Lai is being arrested for collusion with foreign powers at this time,” Mark Simon, an executive of Lai’s media group and his aide, wrote on Twitter.

The 71-year-old owns popular tabloid Apple Daily and is an outspoken pro-democracy figure in Hong Kong who regularly criticizes China’s authoritarian rule and Hong Kong’s government.

Masked and wearing a blue shirt and a light gray blazer, Lai was led out of his mansion in Kowloon by police officers also wearing surgical masks and was taken away.

Hong Kong police said seven people between 39 and 72 years old had been arrested on suspicion of violating the new security law, with offences including collusion with a foreign country, but the statement did not reveal the names of those arrested. The police did not rule out further arrests being made.

The move, coming days after the U.S. government announced sanctions on Hong Kong and mainland Chinese officials, shows China’s determination to move forward with enforcement of the new law despite outside pressure.

The officials shrugged off the sanctions, which may have limited practical effect, with one saying that being named by the U.S. showed that he was doing the right thing for Hong Kong and China. They have rejected any criticism of Hong Kong policy as foreign interference in China’s domestic affairs.

Simon said police searched both Lai’s and his son’s home, and detained several other members of media group Next Digital, which Lai founded.

In May, shortly after Beijing announced its intention to pass the national security law in Hong Kong, Lai penned an op-ed in the New York Times stating that China was repressing Hong Kong with the legislation.

“I have always thought I might one day be sent to jail for my publications or for my calls for democracy in Hong Kong,” Lai wrote.

“But for a few tweets, and because they are said to threaten the national security of mighty China? That’s a new one, even for me,” he said.

Lai had previously been arrested in February and April, for allegedly participating in an unauthorized protests last year. He also faces charges for joining an unauthorized vigil on June 4 aimed at marking the anniversary of Beijing’s crackdown on protests in Tiananmen Square in 1989.

The details behind the accusation that Lai or others at the newspaper may have colluded with foreign forces were not clear.

Last year, Lai met Vice-President of the United States Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at the White House to discuss Hong Kong’s controversial legislation — since withdrawn — that would have allowed criminal suspects to be extradited to mainland China to stand trial.

But Hong Kong officials have said the national security law, which took effect June 30, would not be applied retroactively. The law is widely seen as a means to curb dissent after anti-government protests rocked the semi-autonomous city for months last year.

The legislation outlaws secessionist, subversive and terrorist acts, as well as collusion with foreign forces in the city’s internal affairs. The maximum punishment for serious offenders is life imprisonment.

Over a hundred police raided Next Digital’s headquarters, cordoning off the area, searching desks in the newsroom and at times getting into heated exchanges with Next Digital staff. What police were looking for in the building wasn’t clear. Simon said in a tweet that the police were executing a search warrant.

Next Digital operates the Apple Daily tabloid, which Lai founded in 1995, ahead of Britain’s handover of Hong Kong to China. Like Lai, Apple Daily has a strong pro-democracy stance and often urged its readers to take part in pro-democracy protests.

“We are completely shocked by what’s happening now, with the arrest and followed by the ongoing raid inside the headquarters of Next Digital,” said Chris Yeung, chairman of the Hong Kong Journalists Association.

“With the passage of the national security law and the really tough powers given to the police in their operations, we have seen now, what we call ‘white terror’ become a reality, which will affect media organizations and journalists’ reporting.”

Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council condemned the arrests in a statement, saying that such arrests were a tool for the Chinese Communist Party’s “political cleansing and hegemonic expansion.” It said the law was abused to suppress the freedom of speech, press freedom and the civil rights of Hong Kong people.

Last month, Chinese broadcaster CCTV said pro-democracy activist Nathan Law and five others were wanted under the law, although all six had fled overseas. Law had relocated to Britain in July to continue international advocacy work for Hong Kong.

Zen Soo, The Associated Press











Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending