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Public Health Sudbury confirms 1st cases of Influenza A in more than two years – Sudbury.com

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Public Health Sudbury and Districts (PHSD) reported Monday that it has confirmed cases of Influenza A within its local jurisdiction. 

“This local activity is aligned with the sharp increase in influenza cases detected across Canada in the last few weeks,” said a news release from PHSD. Area residents are reminded to protect themselves and others from respiratory infections by implementing simple and effective protective practices.

This is a significant change from the situation in mid-March when PHSD said it had been more than two years since there had been any significant outbreaks of the flu. 

In a story Sudbury.com reported in March, the health unit said up to that point and throughout the pandemic, there had been no confirmed cases of the flu.

“The last reported cases of influenza reported to Public Health Sudbury & Districts occurred between October 2019, and March 2020. During that time, there were 85 confirmed cases reported,” said PHSD.

The health unit said one of the key reasons for that was that people took solid precautions against COVID-19, which is also a respiratory disease.

“Through the COVID-19 pandemic, we have learned of the simple ways to protect ourselves from respiratory disease. These behaviours, such as staying home when ill, handwashing, masking, and getting vaccinated, protect us from influenza as well as COVID-19,” said Justeen Mansourian, a PHSD public health nurse. 

The incidence of flu is monitored locally as well as nationally by Health Canada

For residents who might be worried about the flu bug, vaccines are available throughout the Sudbury health unit area. 

“Influenza vaccine is still available at locations throughout the community, including local pharmacies and health care providers’ offices. Public Health Sudbury & Districts also offers flu vaccines by appointment at many of our locations,” Mansourian said.

“This year is unusual in that we are seeing a very late start to the influenza season, which, in Canada, typically runs from November to April. Our first cases are usually reported in December or January with the season wrapping up in March or April. The late season influenza trend is occurring across Canada, with influenza activity spiking in April and approaching seasonal levels in some parts of the country,” said Mansourian.

PHSD said it is reminding residents that the influenza vaccine is offered free of charge in Ontario for anyone aged six months of age or older and remains the best way to protect yourself and your loved ones from influenza. The vaccine is particularly recommended for people with medical conditions who are at risk of developing complications from an influenza infection, said Mansourian.

The health unit said influenza is a highly contagious respiratory virus that can cause fever, cough, muscle aches, and fatigue. Most people will recover from influenza infection within a week to 10 days, but some are at greater risk of developing more severe complications such as pneumonia. Children can also have mild stomach upset due to influenza. The most common symptoms usually include fever, runny nose, and cough.

With COVID-19 continuing to circulate widely in the community, and with some common symptoms to other respiratory illnesses, including influenza, it can be difficult to know what virus you have, said PHSD.

Regardless of the cause of the infection, the same protective measures still apply to help prevent becoming sick with or spreading influenza and other viruses. The health unit advises area residents that if they have symptoms, they should stay at home, wear a mask if you’re near others, wash your hands frequently and avoid contact with vulnerable persons.

For more information on the influenza virus or influenza vaccination opportunities, please visit our website at phsd.ca or call Public Health Sudbury & Districts at 705.522.9200 (toll-free 1.866.522.9200).

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Monkeypox: Cases found and suspected in Portugal, Spain – CTV News

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LISBON –

Portuguese authorities said on Wednesday they had identified five cases of rare monkeypox infection and Spain’s health services are testing eight potential cases after Britain put Europe on alert for the virus.

The five Portuguese patients, out of 20 suspected cases, are all stable. They are all men and they all live in the region of Lisbon and the Tagus Valley, the Portuguese health authorities said.

European Health authorities are monitoring any outbreak of the disease since Britain has reported its first case of monkeypox on May 7 and found six more in the country since then. 

None of the eight suspected cases in Spain has been confirmed yet, the Spanish Health Ministry said in a statement on Wednesday.

Monkeypox is a rare viral infection similar to human smallpox, though milder, first recorded in the Democratic Republic of Congo in the 1970s. The number of cases in West Africa has increased in the last decade.

Symptoms include fever, headaches and skin rashes starting on the face and spreading to the rest of the body.

It is not particularly infectious between people, Spanish health authorities said, and most people infected recover within a few weeks, though severe cases have been reported.

Four of the cases detected in Britain self-identified as gay, bi-sexual or other men who have sex with men, the U.K. Health Security Agency said, adding evidence suggested there may be a transmission in the community.

The agency in Britain urged men who are gay and bisexual to be aware of any unusual rashes or lesions and to contact a sexual health service without delay.

The Spanish Health Ministry and Portugal’s DGS health authority Spanish did not release any information on the sexual orientation of the monkeypox patients or suspected patients.

The two countries sent out alerts to health professionals in order to identify more possible cases.

(Reporting by Patricia Rua in Lisbon and Christina Thykjaer in Madrid; Editing by Inti Landauro and Alison Williams)

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Long Covid Patients' Symptoms Helped After Vaccination in Study – BNN

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(Bloomberg) — Fewer Covid-19 patients reported lingering symptoms from the infection after getting vaccinated, according to a study that suggests the shots could help alleviate the burden of long Covid. 

A first vaccine dose after infection with the virus was associated with a 13% decline in the odds of having long Covid and a second shot with a 9% drop in the study published Thursday in the BMJ. Over the course of seven months in 2021, researchers regularly visited the households of more than 28,000 people to ask whether they were experiencing symptoms long after infection.

The findings, together with evidence that long Covid is reduced in those infected after vaccination, suggest that jabs may help decrease the prevalence of persisting symptoms.

“The large scale of this study means that we can be fairly confident about what has been observed, but it does not mean we can be sure what it means,” said Peter English, a former chair of the BMA Public Health Medicine Committee. 

“The most obvious — and perhaps the most likely inference — is that vaccination does prevent at least some cases of long Covid, and may reduce the severity of symptoms,” he said in emailed comments. But “we cannot yet say this with any confidence.” English wasn’t involved in the research. 

An estimated 1.8 million people in the UK had reported experiencing long Covid as of April 2022, with two in three people saying the symptoms had affected their day-to-day activities, according to the latest Office for National Statistics data.

The scientists who ran the study called for more research to “understand the biological mechanisms underpinning any improvements in symptoms after vaccination, which may contribute to the development of therapeutics for long Covid.” 

©2022 Bloomberg L.P.

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Europe, US on alert after new monkeypox cases emerge – Al Jazeera English

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US, Spain and Portugal announce cases of rare viral infection, two weeks after UK identified its first case.

Health authorities are on alert for the spread of monkeypox, a rare viral disease first reported in the Democratic Republic of Congo in the 1970s, after new cases emerged in Europe, and the United States confirmed its first infection.

Portugal said on Wednesday it had identified five cases of monkeypox, Spain said it was testing 23 potential cases, and the US state of Massachusetts announced it had found a case in a man who recently travelled to Canada.

The United Kingdom was the first to confirm a case of monkeypox earlier this month. It has now detected seven cases and is working with the World Health Organization (WHO) to investigate the virus’s spread after being unable to make a link between the initial case, in a man who had travelled from Nigeria, and the more recent ones.

Health authorities suspect some of the infections may have occurred through sexual contact – in this instance among gay or bisexual men – with four of the UK cases identified among people who visited sexual health clinics after developing the rash associated with monkeypox.

“No source of infection has yet been confirmed for either the family or GBMSM clusters,” the WHO said in a statement in Wednesday. “Based on currently available information, infection seems to have been locally acquired in the United Kingdom. The extent of local transmission is unclear at this stage and there is the possibility of identification of further cases.”

Monkeypox, which is similar to human smallpox, typically begins with a flu-like illness and swelling of the lymph nodes, followed by a rash on the face and body. Most people recover from the illness, which is endemic in parts of central and western Africa and usually the result of close contact with infected animals, within a few weeks, but it can be fatal.

The five Portuguese patients, out of 20 suspected cases, are all in a stable condition, according to the country’s health authorities. They are all men who live in the region of Lisbon and the Tagus Valley, they added.

Health authorities in Madrid said the cases discovered in Spain appeared to be linked to sexual contact.

“In general, its transmission is via respiratory drops but the characteristics of the 23 suspected infections point to it being passed on through bodily fluids during sex relations,” they said in a statement, without giving further details.

“All of them are young adult males and most of them are men who have sexual relations with other men, but not all of them,” Elena Andradas, head of public health in the Madrid region, told Cadena Ser radio.

US health officials said the Massachusetts man who developed monkeypox went to Canada to see friends at the end of April and returned home in early May. He is currently being treated in hospital.

Jennifer McQuiston from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said while it was the only case the CDC was aware of, “I do think we are preparing for the possibility of more cases”.

The agency is in contact with its counterparts in the UK and Canada as part of the investigation, but McQuiston said no link had been established so far.

There are two types of monkeypox virus: the West African clade and Congo Basin (Central African) clade. The case-fatality ratio for the West African clade has been documented to be about 1 percent, and up to 10 percent for patients with the Congo Basin clade.

The WHO said that while smallpox vaccination has been effective against monkeypox, the end of mass vaccination programmes for smallpox meant people under the age of 40 or 50 no longer had that protection.

The UK has previously reported cases of monkeypox – all linked to travel to Nigeria – as has the US. An outbreak there in 2003 was traced to pet prairie dogs that had been housed with small animals imported from Ghana that were found to have the virus.

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