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Public warned about unproven therapies for COVID-19 | Columbia Valley, Cranbrook, East Kootenay, Elk Valley, Kimberley, Ktunaxa Nation – E-Know.ca

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College of Pharmacists of British Columbia joins with College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia, and B.C. College of Nursing Professionals to issue warning on the use of unproven treatments and medications for COVID-19

As the COVID-19 global health pandemic continues to impact nearly every aspect of our lives, health professionals are becoming increasingly aware of online and social media-driven conversations about the use of antibiotics and antiviral therapies that are prescribed to treat Malaria, HIV/AIDS and other conditions to treat COVID-19 patients.

Although all British Columbians are hopeful a cure or treatment can be found quickly, it is critical to note that at this time, a proven treatment for COVID-19 does not exist.

“It is important to understand that there are potential harms to the patient, risks to our understanding of what is truly a beneficial treatment or not, and depleting access to therapies known to be helpful or essential in other disease states. For these reasons, the use of unproven therapies for COVID 19 is not recommended outside clinical trials,” says the BC Center for Disease Control.

These unproven treatment claims may include, but are not limited to, the following drugs: hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine, azithromycin, lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) and colchicine.

Health professionals all have a responsibility to their patients and to their profession to focus only on evidence-based care and not yield to well-intentioned patient pressure around unproven and potentially dangerous uses of existing medications.

Doing so could present significant health risks to those patients as well as other unintended consequences such as critical shortages of these existing medications for patients who need them to treat other conditions.

Information around COVID-19 is rapidly evolving and new recommendations and evidence may become available with time.

Physicians and nurse practitioners are being reminded of their obligation not prescribe these therapies for COVID-19 outside the context of a clinical trial, and pharmacists are being instructed not to dispense them if they do.

For more information on the unproven therapies for COVID-19, see:

The College is continuing to add information on pharmacy’s role in helping fight COVID-19 at bcpharmacists.org/COVID19

College of Pharmacists of British Columbia

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Trump says he's done taking hydroxychloroquine, unproven treatment for COVID-19 – CTV News

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TORONTO —
U.S. President Donald Trump is no longer taking the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, he said in an interview Sunday, after weeks of promoting it as a treatment for the novel coronavirus.

In an interview with Sinclair Broadcast’s program “Full Measure With Sharyl Attkisson,” Trump said he had completed a two-week course of the drug, which has not been proven to prevent or treat COVID-19.

“Finished, just finished, yeah,” he said. “And by the way, I’m still here. To the best of my knowledge, here I am.”

A week ago, Trump revealed that he had been taking the drug himself to protect against the virus, despite his own officials cautioning that the drug should not be used outside of hospital or research settings, due to potentially fatal side effects.

His doctor did not prescribe it to him, he said. He requested it specifically.

The FDA-approved drug is used to treat malaria as well as lupus and arthritis. Trump has frequently touted it as a potential treatment in his press briefings, citing anecdotal evidence and limited studies.

In the Full Measure interview, Trump said he took the drug because two staffers in the White House had tested positive, reiterating that he had heard “tremendous reports” about the drug’s effects.

“[Hydroxychloroquine] has had tremendous, if you look at it, tremendous, rave reviews,” he said.

No rigorous, large-scale study has found the drug to be effective for treating or preventing COVID-19.

The World Health Organization announced Monday that it was temporarily dropping hydroxychloroquine from its list of experimental treatments under study. The WHO pointed to a paper published last week in the Lancet that said those taking the drug could be at a higher risk of death and heart problems. 

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No plans to open cooling centres in Waterloo Region this summer – CTV News

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WATERLOO —
It may be more difficult to find relief from the heat in public places this summer.

The Region of Waterloo says there are no plans to open any of their cooling centres for the season.

Municipalities usually open community centres, libraries, and other public buildings during heat warnings, but officials say those spots will stay closed under the COVID-19 shutdown.

“I don’t think we have any plans for setting up cooling centres,” said Mike Murray, CAO for the Region of Waterloo during a Monday media call. “I think our ongoing encouragement to people would be, if they’re outside, to maintain physical distancing and don’t congregate in groups of more than five.”

It was announced last week that splash pads and community pools will also remain closed until further notice.

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BREAKING: WHO suspends trial of hydoxychloroquine for COVID-19 – Vanguard

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WHO suspending trial of hydoxychloroquine for COVID-19

A clinical trial of the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine in coronavirus patients has been suspended amid safety concerns.


The drug has been touted by President Donald Trump and he even revealed he took the medication for two weeks as a prophylactic.

But the World Health Organization (WHO) said it was concerned after a study from The Lancet published on Friday revealed higher mortality rates among COVID-19 patients who took the drug.

Therefore, researchers said they’re suspending the use of hydroxychloroquine in the WHO’s Solidarity Trial, which is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of four drugs and drug combinations against the virus.

‘The executive group has implemented a temporary pause of the hydroxychloroquine arm within the Solidarity trial while the safety data is reviewed by the data safety monitoring board,’ WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said on Monday.

However, the other arms of the trial are continuing.

Source: Daily Mail

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