Connect with us

News

Saskatchewan premier apologizes after killer invited to throne speech

Published

 on

REGINA — Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe apologized Monday after a notorious killer attended the government’s tough-on-crime throne speech last week — and went a step further by stripping caucus duties from the member who invited Colin Thatcher.

While he didn’t extend the invite to Thatcher, Moe said he is ultimately responsible as premier and leader of the government caucus.

Thatcher, who is 84, was invited by a member of the legislative assembly Lyle Stewart, who was stripped of his legislative secretary duties effective Monday.

“To all of those who have attended the speech from the throne, to all members of this assembly and to all of the people of Saskatchewan, I offer my unequivocal apology,” Moe said in the chamber of the Saskatchewan legislature Monday.

Last week, Moe refused to apologize, saying he didn’t extend the invitation.

“Me? What would I apologize for?” Moe said Thursday. “This is an individual (member) who invited someone, not a government who invited someone. I think we need to draw that distinction.”

Moe said he took the weekend to reflect.

“As individuals, each of us has to make an effort to ensure that we are doing all that we can to stop interpersonal and domestic violence in our families, in our friend circles, in our communities and across the province,” Moe said in the legislature, referencing Saskatchewan’s high rate of domestic violence.

He wore a purple tie, a colour that’s associated with International Women’s Day — the same one he wore to mark the occasion earlier this year.

“We all have to be leaders each and every day when it comes to stopping these violent acts. This is even more important when it comes to our provincial government.”

Stewart, who was in the chamber as Moe delivered his apology, did not make eye contact with the premier as he spoke.

The member said in a written statement last week it was “an error in judgment” to invite his longtime friend Thatcher to the speech.

Thatcher’s ex-wife, JoAnn Wilson, was found beaten and shot to death in the garage of her Regina home in 1983.

Thatcher, who was an energy minister under former Conservative premier Grant Devine, was found guilty of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison. He served 22 years behind bars before he was granted full parole in 2006.

The Opposition NDP has criticized the invite and asked the government to strip Stewart and Minister of Policing Christine Tell of their duties.

Both Stewart and Tell initially said they weren’t concerned about the optics of having Thatcher at the speech.

“He has a right to be here,” Tell said after last week’s throne speech. “He’s a citizen of our province who paid his debt to society. That’s just the way it is.”

She incorrectly mischaracterized Thatcher as a free man, but he is still serving a life sentence and reporting to a parole officer.

The government refused to make Tell available for an interview Monday.

“I think the fact that we have not seen Minister Tell come out and respond to her very out-of-touch comments last week has not shown any indication that she has walked back on those comments,” Opposition NDP Leader Carla Beck said. “And if she refuses to apologize, I do think that this is grounds for her to be removed from that position.”

Moe confirmed that he would not be disciplining Tell for her remarks, and that his apology is on behalf of his entire Saskatchewan Party caucus.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on Oct. 31, 2022.

 

Mickey Djuric, The Canadian Press

News

Mexico visa-free travel a ‘bilateral irritant’ for Canada-U.S. relations – National – Global News

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

Mexico visa-free travel a ‘bilateral irritant’ for Canada-U.S. relations – National  Global News

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Show Employers You Can Hit the Ground Running

Published

 on

Employers are increasingly stating: “We want someone who can hit the ground running.”

Essentially, the message is, “Don’t expect us to explain the basics. We expect you to know your sh*t.” Employers understand you’ll need time to learn their business, applications, software, infrastructure, etc. However, they expect that you’re proficient in Microsoft Office Suite software (Word, Excel, PowerPoint), understand file management (creating, saving, and organizing files), and know how to troubleshoot common computer problems, and won’t be learning these basic computer skills as part of your learning curve on their dime.

Employers aren’t in the business of training people. You’re responsible for your career; therefore, you’re responsible for acquiring the skillset you need.

For an employee’s compensation to be justified, an ROI (return on investment) is required. When referring to employment, ROI refers to the value an employee brings to the company relative to their compensation. Employers pay their employees, and employees work for their wages. Employee work value is created when their work directly or indirectly results in profitably selling the company’s goods and services. Your best chance of job security (no guarantee) is to be an employee who undeniably contributes measurable value to your employer’s profitability.

(Employee’s measurable value to the company) – (Employer’s investment in compensation) = (ROI)

Understandably, employers are looking for candidates who can make an immediate impact, individuals who can jump right in, learn and adapt quickly, and start delivering results as soon as possible. Hence, you want to distinguish yourself as being capable and willing to “hit the ground running.”

Here are some tips to help you present yourself as a fast-starting, high-potential hire:

Emphasize relevant experience

Presenting irrelevant information will be perceived as lacking the ability to communicate succinctly, a highly valued skill in the business world. Only share experiences and quantified results (key), results that are pertinent to the position you’re applying for.

When crafting your resume and cover letter, identify the skills, knowledge, and previous responsibilities/quantified results that align with the job you’re aiming for. By demonstrating that you’ve “been there, done that” and brought measurable value to previous employers in a similar scenario, employers will feel confident that you can immediately deliver value.

Showcase transferable skills

Consider the universal soft skills that employers universally value.

  • Analytical
  • Communication
  • Interpersonal
  • Problem-solving
  • Project management
  • Time management

Tell STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) stories—describing a specific situation, the task you were assigned, the actions you took, and the results of your actions—that showcase your soft skills and explain how you can leverage them to succeed in the role you’re applying for. This’ll assure your interviewer you have the fundamental skills to achieve successful outcomes.

“While working at Norback, Jenkins, & St. Clair, I led a team of five architects to redesign a historic downtown Winnipeg landmark according to strict deadlines and complex stakeholder demands. I conducted Monday morning team meetings and used Slack to provide tailored updates to keep the team aligned. As a result of my communication skills, the project was completed on time and under the $7.5 million dollars budget.”

Discuss onboarding insights

A great way to position yourself as someone eager to hit the ground running is to show that you’ve considered what it’ll take to start delivering value.

“Based on my understanding of the typical onboarding timeline for this type of position, I anticipate completing all training and ramp-up activities within my first two weeks, enabling me to begin tackling projects by my first quarter.”

Assuming you’ve researched the company and studied current industry trends, which you should have done, mention the extra steps you’ve taken to prepare for the role. This’ll show your willingness to learn and will require minimal handholding.

Emphasize quick adaptability

Employers value the ability to adapt quickly to new situations and challenges. During your interviews, share examples of your flexibility and agility.

At some point in your career, you’ve likely had to learn something new (e.g., software, operating system) on the fly. Also likely, you’ve had to navigate a major change or disruption. Using STAR stories, explain how you approached these scenarios, your strategies, and the positive outcomes.

By showing resilience, resourcefulness, and adaptability, you demonstrate that you can thrive in ambiguous or rapidly evolving environments.

Propose a transition plan.

Presenting a transition plan is a strategy that wows employers, primarily because it is rare for a candidate to do this. This shows you’re ready to take ownership of your onboarding and deliver results.

Include specifics like:

  • Milestones you aim to accomplish in your first 30, 60, and 90 days.
  • Training activities or learning opportunities you’ll pursue.
  • Initial projects or tasks you’d tackle to demonstrate your capabilities.
  • Ways you’ll quickly build relationships with your new colleagues.

Showing this level of forethought and initiative shows you’re a strategic thinker, able to organize your thoughts, and, most importantly, eager to get started.

By touting your relevant experience, showcasing your transferable skills, discussing your onboarding insights, emphasizing your quick adaptability, and proposing a detailed transition plan, you’ll position yourself as a self-driven professional capable of driving results from the start, differentiating you from your competition.

_____________________________________________________________________

 

Nick Kossovan, a well-seasoned veteran of the corporate landscape, offers “unsweetened” job search advice. You can send Nick your questions to artoffindingwork@gmail.com.

 

 

 

Continue Reading

News

Karen Read back in court after murder case of Boston police officer boyfriend ended in mistrial

Published

 on

BOSTON (AP) — Karen Read returns to court Monday for the first time since her murder case involving her Boston police officer boyfriend ended in a mistrial.

Read is accused of ramming into John O’Keefe with her SUV and leaving him for dead in a snowstorm in January 2022. Her two-month trial ended when jurors declared they were hopelessly deadlocked and a judge declared a mistrial on the fifth day of deliberations.

Jury deliberations during the trial are among the issues likely to be addressed.

In several motions, the defense contends four jurors have said the jury unanimously reached a not-guilty verdict on those two charges. The jurors reported being deadlocked only on the charge of manslaughter while operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol and trying her again for murder would be unconstitutional double jeopardy, they said.

The defense also argues Judge Beverly Cannone abruptly announced the mistrial without questioning the jurors about where they stood on each of the three charges Read faced and without giving lawyers for either side a chance to comment.

Prosecutors described the defense request to drop charges of second-degree murder and leaving the scene of a deadly accident an “unsubstantiated but sensational post-trial claim” based on “hearsay, conjecture and legally inappropriate reliance as to the substance of jury deliberations.”

As they push against a retrial, the defense also wants the judge to hold a “post-verdict inquiry” and question all 12 jurors if necessary to establish the record they say should have been created before the mistrial was declared, showing jurors “unanimously acquitted the defendant of two of the three charges against her.”

After the mistrial, Cannone ordered the names of the jurors to not be released for 10 days. She extended that order indefinitely Thursday after one of the jurors filed a motion saying they feared for their own and their family’s safety if the names are made public. The order does not preclude a juror from coming forward and identifying themselves, but so far none have done so.

Prosecutors argued the defense was given a chance to respond and, after one note from the jury indicating it was deadlocked, told the court there had been sufficient time and advocated for the jury to be declared deadlocked. Prosecutors wanted deliberations to continue, which they did before a mistrial was declared the following day.

“Contrary to the representation made in the defendant’s motion and supporting affidavits, the defendant advocated for and consented to a mistrial, as she had adequate opportunities to object and instead remained silent which removes any double jeopardy bar to retrial,” prosecutors wrote in their motion.

Read, a former adjunct professor at Bentley College, had been out drinking with O’Keefe, a 16-year member of the Boston police who was found outside the Canton home of another Boston police officer. An autopsy found O’Keefe died of hypothermia and blunt force trauma.

The defense contended O’Keefe was killed inside the home after Read dropped him off and that those involved chose to frame her because she was a “convenient outsider.”

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending