Connect with us

News

Texts give insight into feds’ communications strategy before ‘Freedom Convoy’ arrival

Published

 on

OTTAWA — Newly released text messages show how the federal government was planning its communications strategy before the arrival of “Freedom Convoy” protesters in Ottawa back in late January.

Messages between a senior member of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s staff and Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino’s press secretary on Jan. 24 have been released by the public inquiry investigating the government’s use of the Emergencies Act.

In the exchange, the prime minister’s adviser Mary-Liz Power said Mendicino’s office was considering having the minister do media interviews about “some of the more extreme elements” of the protest.

“I think there could be an opportunity to get in on this growing narrative of the truckers,” the text said.

Power said they would use a similar message to the one used in response to the Jan. 6 attacks in Washington, D.C.

She suggested Mendicino could talk about how some convoy organizers’ language was concerning and needed to be taken seriously, but warned he would need to be careful to ensure it didn’t look like government was directing police.

Mendicino’s press secretary at the time, Alex Cohen, responded to say Mendicino wanted to wait a day or two because there was a danger that if they come down too hard, it “might push out the crazies.”

On Jan. 26, Trudeau denounced the “fringe” views of the people supporting the protests.

“The small fringe minority of people who are on their way to Ottawa, who are holding unacceptable views that they are expressing, do not represent the views of Canadians who have been there for each other, who know that following the science and stepping up to protect each other is the best way to continue to ensure our freedoms, our rights, our values as a country,” Trudeau said at the time.

Those comments helped galvanize protesters, according to police intelligence reports, and being part of the “fringe minority” soon became a point of pride among protesters in Ottawa.

Protests officially got underway near Parliament Hill on Jan. 29.

The Trudeau government invoked the Emergencies Act on Feb. 14, arguing its temporary and extraordinary powers were needed to end weeks of noisy protests in downtown Ottawa and blockades at border crossings.

The Public Order Emergency Commission is tasked with determining whether the government was justified in triggering the never-before-used legislation. It is holding public hearings in Ottawa until Nov. 25.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 31, 2022.

 

David Fraser, The Canadian Press

News

Doug Ford once again calls on Bank of Canada to lower interest rates – CP24

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

Doug Ford once again calls on Bank of Canada to lower interest rates  CP24

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

News

'Stars are aligning' for Bank of Canada rate cut: economists – CTV News

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

‘Stars are aligning’ for Bank of Canada rate cut: economists  CTV News

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

News

Member of Canada Soccer support team detained in France for alleged drone use

Published

 on

PARIS – The Canadian Olympic Committee says a “non-accredited” member of Canada Soccer’s support team has been detained by French authorities in Saint-Étienne for allegedly using a drone to record New Zealand’s women’s soccer team during practice.

The New Zealand Olympic Committee said in a statement Tuesday that team support members alerted police after a drone was flown over the women’s soccer team’s practice on Monday, leading to the detention.

The NZOC said it registered a complaint with the International Olympic Committee’s integrity unit and asked Canada for a full review.

The COC said in a statement released Tuesday it is “shocked and disappointed” over the allegation and apologized to the NZOC and New Zealand Football.

“The Canadian Olympic Committee stands for fair-play and we are shocked and disappointed,” the statement said. “We offer our heartfelt apologies to New Zealand Football, to all the players affected, and to the New Zealand Olympic Committee.”

Canada, the defending Olympic women’s soccer champion, is scheduled to open its tournament against 28th ranked New Zealand on Friday in Saint-Étienne.

The COC said it is reviewing next steps with the IOC, Paris 2024, Canada Soccer and FIFA. The COC said it will provide an update Wednesday.

“Canada Soccer is working closely and cooperatively with the Canadian Olympic Committee on the matter involving the Women’s National Team,” Canada Soccer communications chief Paulo Senra said it a statement. “Next steps are being reviewed with the IOC, Paris 2024, and FIFA. We will provide an update (Wednesday).”

It’s not the first time a Canadian soccer team has been involved in a drone controversy involving an international rival’s training session.

In 2021 at Toronto, Honduras stopped a training session ahead of its men’s World Cup qualifier against Canada after spotting a drone above the field, according to reports in Honduran media. The teams played to a 1-1 draw.

French security forces guarding Paris 2024 sites are intercepting an average of six drones per day, Prime Minister Gabriel Attal said Tuesday.

Attal added the drones are often operated by “individuals, maybe tourists wanting to take pictures.”

“That’s why it’s important to remind people of the rules. There’s a ban on flying drones,” he said, according to multiple news outlets.

“Systems are in place to allow us to very quickly intercept (drones) and arrest their operators.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 23, 2024.

The Canadian Press. All rights reserved.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending