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Scientists discover hell-like planet with oceans of lava, perpetual sunlight and rock rain

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No one wants to go to hell — neither the place of eternal damnation nor a new planet scientists recently discovered.

The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society recently published findings of astronomers who found Earth-like planets circling so close to their host star that their surfaces were molten, making them “lava planets.” One of the planets is called “K2-141b.”

K2-141b sits on the edge of our solar system. Scientists used computer models to predict the planet’s conditions.

An artist rendition of a K2-141b (Image by Julie Roussy, McGill Graphic Design and Getty Images.)

On one of side of the planet, the night side, temperatures get as low as -200 degrees Celsius. On the day side, which experiences “perpetual sunlight,” temperatures reach as high as 3,000 degrees Celsius. Scientists said that’s hot enough to melt and vaporize rocks, creating an “atmosphere.”

“Our finding likely means that the atmosphere extends a little beyond the shore of the magma ocean, making it easier to spot with space telescopes,” says Nicolas Cowan, a professor in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at McGill University.

But in some ways, the hellish planet mimics Earth in terms of precipitation. 

Water on the Earth evaporates, rises into the atmosphere, condenses and falls back as rain. But on K2-141b, that “rain” contains sodium, silicon monoxide and silicon dioxide. On Earth, rain falls back into the ocean and the water cycle repeats. On K2-141b, supersonic winds carry the “rain” to fall into magma oceans, before evaporating and becoming rock rain again.

Scientists intend to study the planet more and confirm their hypothesis, hoping in the meantime that the hell planet won’t freeze over.
Source: – FOX 5 NY

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NOAA scientists discover new species of gelatinous animal near Puerto Rico – CTV News

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Scientists have discovered a new species of ctenophore, or comb jelly, near Puerto Rico.

The newly named Duobrachium sparksae was discovered two and a half miles below sea level by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries research team. It was found during an underwater expedition using a remotely operated vehicle in 2015 and filmed by a high-definition camera.

NOAA Fisheries scientists Mike Ford and Allen Collins spotted the ctenophore and recognized it as a new species. This is the first time NOAA scientists have identified a new species using only high-definition video, according to NOAA.

“The cameras on the Deep Discoverer robot are able to get high-resolution images and measure structures less than a millimeter. We don’t have the same microscopes as we would in a lab, but the video can give us enough information to understand the morphology in detail, such as the location of their reproductive parts and other aspects,” Collins said.

The scientists also said there was another unique quality to the discovery. During the expedition, they were not able to gather any samples, so the video evidence is all they have.

“Naming of organisms is guided by international code, but some changes have allowed descriptions of new species based on video — certainly when species are rare and when collection is impossible,” Ford said. “When we made these observations, we were 4,000 metres down, using a remote vehicle, and we did not have the capabilities to take a sample.”

There are between 100 and 150 species of comb jellies, and despite their name, they are not related to jellyfish at all, according to the NOAA. The species is carnivorous, and many are highly efficient predators that eat small arthropods and many kinds of larvae.

The researchers said that there did not initially get a long look at the animal, so there is still a lot about this new species that they do not know yet. Their findings were recently published in the journal Plankton and Benthos Research.

“We’re not sure of their role in the ecosystem yet,” Ford said.

“We can consider that it serves similar roles to other ctenophores near the ocean floor and it also has some similarities to other ctenophores in open ocean areas,” he said.

The videos are now part of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Collection and publicly accessible.

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You might want to stay up late: lunar eclipse to coincide with November’s Beaver full moon early Monday morning – Toronto Star

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A special celestial event is set to grace Toronto skies early Monday morning.

The November full moon, which is traditionally called the Beaver moon, will coincide with a penumbral lunar eclipse.

This kind of eclipse event happens when the moon crosses Earth’s outer shadow, or penumbra, giving it a reddish brown hue.

Those in Toronto will be able to observe the phenomenon starting 2:29 a.m. ET. The eclipse will be at its peak at 4:42 a.m. ET.

Environment Canada predicts partly cloudy skies at that time, but stargazing enthusiasts may be able to get a glimpse of the moon.

Although the Canadian Space Agency notes lunar eclipses are usually among the most observable because you can see them — quite safely — with the naked eye, with the more subtle penumbral eclipse they recommend using binoculars or a small telescope for the best viewing experience.

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Fourth and last lunar eclipse of 2020 to occur on Monday – Geo News

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A penumbral lunar eclipse is creating only a dark shading on the moon’s face, in this file photo. — AFP

The fourth and last lunar eclipse of 2020, a penumbral eclipse, will occur on November 30 (Monday).

According to Prof Dr Javed Iqbal, of the Institute of Space and Planetary Astrophysics (ISPA), University of Karachi, the eclipse will take place at 12:32pm according to Pakistan Standard Time.

The lunar eclipse will be seen in South and North America, Australia and Asian countries and will not be seen anywhere in Pakistan.

It will reach its peak at 2:42pm, Dr Iqbal said, adding that the shadow of the eclipse will be removed from the moon at 4:53pm.

The total duration of the eclipse will last 4 hours and 21 minutes, Dr Iqbal said.

The last three lunar eclipses occurred on January 10, June 5, and July 4.

A penumbral eclipse occurs when the Earth blocks some of the sun’s light from directly reaching the moon’s surface. All or part of the moon is covered with the outer part of its shadow, also known as the penumbra.

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