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SpaceX, NASA to try again for launch of 2 astronauts from Florida – CBC.ca

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Elon Musk’s private rocket company SpaceX was set for a repeat attempt at launching two Americans into orbit on Saturday from Florida for a mission that would mark the first spaceflight of NASA astronauts from U.S. soil in nine years.

The mission’s first launch try on Wednesday was called off with less than 17 minutes remaining on the countdown clock due to stormy weather around the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral.

The forecast for Saturday was likewise precarious. Mission managers plan to make an earlier decision on weather hazards in a bid to avoid unnecessarily wearing out the crew with another suit-up and full day of launch preparations.

“Back-to-back wet dress rehearsals” disrupt the astronauts’ sleep cycles, NASA chief Jim Bridenstine told a Friday news conference.

Barring weather or other unforeseen problems, the 24-story-tall SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is due to lift off at 3:22 p.m. ET, propelling astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken aloft on a 19-hour ride to the International Space Station.

They will be carried there inside the newly designed Crew Dragon capsule, making its first flight into orbit with humans aboard.

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The launch pad is the same one used by NASA’s final space shuttle flight, piloted by Hurley, in 2011. Since then, NASA astronauts have had to hitch rides into orbit aboard Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft.

Bridenstine has said that resuming launches of American astronauts on American-made rockets from U.S. soil is the space agency’s top priority.

For Musk, the launch represents another milestone for the reusable rockets his company pioneered to make spaceflight less costly and frequent. And it would mark the first time that commercially developed space vehicles – owned and operated by a private entity rather than NASA – have carried Americans into orbit.

The last time NASA launched astronauts into space aboard a brand new vehicle was 40 years ago at the start of the shuttle program.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence visited the Kennedy Space Center three days ago for the first launch attempt. Trump said he plans to return for Saturday’s retry.

NASA astronauts Doug Hurley, left, and Bob Behnken shake hands outside the Neil A. Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral on Wednesday. (John Raoux/Associated Press)

If the mission is scrubbed again, the next launch window would be Sunday afternoon, with weather forecasts appearing somewhat more favourable for that day.

Musk, the South African-born high-tech entrepreneur who made his fortune in Silicon Valley, is also the CEO of electric carmaker and battery manufacturer Tesla Inc. He founded Hawthorne, California-based SpaceX, formally known as Space Exploration Technologies, in 2002.

Hurley, 53, and Behnken, 49, NASA employees under contract to fly with SpaceX, are expected to remain at the space station for several weeks, assisting a short-handed crew aboard the orbital laboratory.

Aerospace giant Boeing Co, producing its own launch system in competition with SpaceX, is expected to fly its CST-100 Starliner vehicle with astronauts aboard for the first time next year. NASA has awarded nearly $8 billion to SpaceX and Boeing combined for development of their rival rockets.

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Your guide to spotting the NEOWISE comet – The London Free Press

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Discovered at the end of March, the NEOWISE comet is passing within 100 million kilometres of our planet. “That in astronomical terms is close, but in human terms very far,” said Parshati Patel, an astrophysicist with Western University’s Institute for Earth & Space Exploration.

So don’t worry — even though Patel says comets are unpredictable, this one won’t ram into the Earth, as often happens in Hollywood movies and science-fiction paperbacks.

Comets are leftover chunks from the formation of a planet, she says, composed of dust, ice and rocks. “It’s almost like a dirty snowball in many ways,” Patel said. They appear as bright spots, with a tail, in the sky.

Patel got up early this week to catch a glimpse of NEOWISE, which gets its name from the asteroid-hunting part of NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission, an Earth-orbiting telescope that detected the object.

“I personally went on Tuesday. It wasn’t really great. There were some clouds in the sky,” Patel said. “We couldn’t really see it with the naked eye.”

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ATLANTIC SKIES: How did the moon form? – SaltWire Network

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There are a number of theories as to how our moon formed, or where it may have come from.

The primary one – which is backed by most lunar scientists – is called the “giant impact hypothesis.” Its premise is that the moon formed as a result of a collision, approximately 4.5 billion years ago, between the newly-formed Earth and a Mars-sized object (given the name “Theia”), with the moon forming when some of the debris coalesced around the core of Theia.

A variation of this theory has the moon forming from a number of massive objects that struck the young planet, sending up large quantities of material that eventually formed the moon.

Another variation, put forward in 2012, theorizes that the moon formed when two massive objects, five times the size of Mars, crashed into one another, with the Earth created from the majority of the collision material and the moon from the remaining debris disk that orbited the new planet.

The second theory, referred to as the “co-formation theory”, holds that the moon formed much as (and at the same time as) the Earth. It postulates that as the dust and gas in the giant molecular cloud that would eventually form our solar system coalesced into the sun and the various planets, some of that material also formed the moon. This theory provided a plausible explanation as to why the Earth and moon are very similar in material-makeup.

The final theory, called the “capture theory”, posits that the moon is a celestial object, formed elsewhere in the solar system, that was captured by Earth’s gravity. One flaw in this theory, however, is that such objects are usually oddly-shaped (e.g., some of the moons of Saturn), not spherical like our moon. A variation of the capture theory states that Earth’s gravity, at some point billions of years ago, stole the moon from Venus (which has no moon).



This week’s sky

Mercury remains too close to the sun to be seen at present.

Jupiter (magnitude -2.7) will be at opposition (directly opposite the sun as seen from Earth) on July 14. It will also be at perigee (closest approach to Earth) and will be at its biggest and brightest for the year. Binoculars will show the four Jovian moons – Io, Callisto, Europa and Ganymede – orbiting the planet. Jupiter will become visible above the southeastern horizon shortly before 10 p.m., remaining visible in the night sky (highest in the southeast at midnight) until around 4:40 a.m., when it will be lost to the approaching dawn.

Saturn (magnitude +0.17) is visible about 10 degrees above the southeastern horizon around 10:30 p.m., reaching 23 degrees above the southern horizon around 1:50 a.m., before succumbing to the dawn twilight in the southwest shortly before 5 a.m.

Mars (magnitude -0.64) is visible about 41 degrees above the southeastern horizon shortly after midnight, before fading from view shortly after 5 a.m.

Our “morning star” Venus (magnitude -4.48) shines brilliantly above the eastern horizon around 3 a.m., reaching 20 degrees above the horizon before fading from sight as dawn breaks shortly after 5 a.m.

Comet coming

Try and catch a glimpse of Comet C/2020 F3 NEOWISE in the constellation of Lynx in the northwest evening sky around July 15. Look to the lower right of the front feet of Ursa Major – the Great Bear, just as the sky begins to darken between 9-10 p.m. By July 23, it will be visible at the same time of night closer to the bowl of the Big Dipper asterism in Ursa Major.

Discovered in March 2020, it has now developed two tails (one gas, one dust). The comet passed perihelion on July 3 and will make its closest approach to Earth (perigee) on July 23.

Though now fading (currently estimated at magnitude +0.1), it may be visible to the naked eye under a clear, dark sky throughout the remainder of the month, with binoculars and small scopes enhancing the view; a timed photo shoot should capture the comet nicely. Google the comet online for the latest updates and finder charts.

Until next week, clear skies.

Events:

July 14 – Jupiter at opposition/perigee


Glenn K. Roberts lives in Stratford, P.E.I., and has been an avid amateur astronomer since he was a small child. He welcomes comments from readers, and anyone who would like to do so is encouraged to email him at glennkroberts@gmail.com.

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COVID affecting younger demographic – Medicine Hat News

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By GILLIAN SLADE on July 8, 2020.

gslade@medicinehatnews.com@MHNGillianSlade

There is the impression that the Albertans currently being diagnosed with COVID-19 are a younger demographic.

According to the numbers released by Alberta Health on Monday, 21 per cent are between the ages of 40 and 49 years, 20 per cent are 30-to-39 years old, 15 per cent 20-to-29 years of age and 14 per cent are the 50-to-59 year demographic.

If you look at data provided by Alberta Health on 26 April, three months ago, the numbers are only slightly different. On that day 22 per cent were in the 30-to-39 year bracket, 18 per cent 40-to-49 years, 15 per cent 50-to-59 years and 14 per cent 20-to-29 years.

Since April though the testing criteria for the province has changed and this could be influencing the numbers by demographic.

“A common source of COVID-19 transmission, particularly in young people, is socializing without practising physical distancing and attending gatherings or parties with shared food and drinks,” said Tom McMillan, assistant director communications for Alberta Health.

He says there has also been an increase recently in the number of Albertans, less than 40 years of age, getting tested.

“Alberta has the broadest testing criteria in Canada, with testing available for anyone, even those without symptoms,” said McMillan.

We are also in the middle of the province’s relaunch after the lock down. McMillan says the locations of new cases has “largely shifted from continuing care environments to indoor and community settings, such as workplaces or large gatherings”.

Even though we have seen an increase in younger Albertans testing positive, everyone is at risk of catching COVID-19, said McMillan.

“It is important that we do not shame those who test positive but rather support them to isolate and work with public health to do contact tracing and follow up,” said McMillan.

According to Alberta Health’s data this week: the average age for COVID-19 cases that did not require hospitalization is 39 years. The average age for those needing hospitalization for COVID is 62, those requiring ICU is 60 years and the average age for those who died is 83 years.

It is interesting to note that only four per cent of those more than 80 years old test positive for COVID-19.

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