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Swedish government promises $12 billion to kick-start economy in 2021 budget

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STOCKHOLM (Reuters) – Sweden’s government will pump 105 billion crowns ($12 billion) into the economy in 2021 in tax cuts and spending measures in a record give-away aimed at getting the economy back on its feet after the coronavirus pandemic-induced slump.

The government forecast Sweden’s gross domestic product will shrink around 4.6% this year in its budget on Monday, a milder hit than many other European countries. But the government said record fiscal stimulus was needed to get the country moving again.

“Together we are going to work Sweden’s way out of the crisis and build a more sustainable society,” the minority coalition said in a statement.

While many countries in Europe are re-imposing COVID restrictions after a surge in new cases, attention is turning to how to kick-start economies to ensure those who lost their jobs during the pandemic are not permanently side-lined and to support an new era of environmentally sustainable growth.

Sweden’s Social Democrat and Green coalition said the focus would be on boosting jobs, welfare and supporting the switch to a carbon-free future as it outlined a raft of tax cuts and new spending.

Most of the budget was already known, with measures a hodge-podge agreed with two small-centre right parties which help keep the coalition in power.

(Reporting by Simon Johnson; editing by Niklas Pollard)

Source: – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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Paying cash to contractors drives underground economy – Investment Executive

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Paying cash to contractors drives underground economy  Investment Executive



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Japan raises view on demand, but says economy in severe situation – SaltWire Network

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By Daniel Leussink

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s government upgraded its view on consumption in a monthly report in October on stronger demand for electronics and higher travel spending, but cautioned broader economic conditions remained severe due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Authorities maintained their assessment that the world’s third-largest economy was showing signs of picking up from the fallout of COVID-19, which included a hit to Japan’s exports from a slump in global demand.

“The Japanese economy remains in a severe situation due to the novel coronavirus, but it is showing signs of picking up,” the government said in its October economic report.

The economy suffered its worst postwar contraction in the second quarter and analysts expect any rebound to be modest.

The government already has announced $2.2 trillion in economic stimulus in response to the virus crisis, and analysts polled by Reuters said it should compile a third extra budget for the current fiscal year.

The government said the impact from policy measures at home and improvement in economic activity overseas supported hopes for a continued rebound in the economy.

But it also flagged the risk that coronavirus infections could further weigh on domestic and overseas economies.

While many countries eased coronavirus restrictions earlier this year, some have had to resume curbs as they face a second wave of infections.

Japan’s government upgraded its view on private consumption for the first time in seven months due to more robust domestic demand for household electronics and higher nationwide hotel occupancy rates, especially in Hokkaido in northern Japan.

“It’s very encouraging that consumption is picking up,” Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura said at a news conference after the cabinet approved the report.

“While capital spending, exports, production and employment are improving, it of course can’t be said (economic conditions) have completely recovered so the overall assessment was left unchanged,” he said.

The government stuck to its assessment that exports are picking up, according to the report.

But it downgraded its view on imports for the first time in seven months due to relatively weak shipments from the United States and the Asian region, a Cabinet Office official said.

The government’s assessment of the remaining components in the report remained unchanged.

(Reporting by Daniel Leussink; Editing by Ana Nicolaci da Costa and Kim Coghill)

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Japan raises view on demand, but says economy in severe situation – The Journal Pioneer

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By Daniel Leussink

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s government upgraded its view on consumption in a monthly report in October on stronger demand for electronics and higher travel spending, but cautioned broader economic conditions remained severe due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Authorities maintained their assessment that the world’s third-largest economy was showing signs of picking up from the fallout of COVID-19, which included a hit to Japan’s exports from a slump in global demand.

“The Japanese economy remains in a severe situation due to the novel coronavirus, but it is showing signs of picking up,” the government said in its October economic report.

The economy suffered its worst postwar contraction in the second quarter and analysts expect any rebound to be modest.

The government already has announced $2.2 trillion in economic stimulus in response to the virus crisis, and analysts polled by Reuters said it should compile a third extra budget for the current fiscal year.

The government said the impact from policy measures at home and improvement in economic activity overseas supported hopes for a continued rebound in the economy.

But it also flagged the risk that coronavirus infections could further weigh on domestic and overseas economies.

While many countries eased coronavirus restrictions earlier this year, some have had to resume curbs as they face a second wave of infections.

Japan’s government upgraded its view on private consumption for the first time in seven months due to more robust domestic demand for household electronics and higher nationwide hotel occupancy rates, especially in Hokkaido in northern Japan.

“It’s very encouraging that consumption is picking up,” Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura said at a news conference after the cabinet approved the report.

“While capital spending, exports, production and employment are improving, it of course can’t be said (economic conditions) have completely recovered so the overall assessment was left unchanged,” he said.

The government stuck to its assessment that exports are picking up, according to the report.

But it downgraded its view on imports for the first time in seven months due to relatively weak shipments from the United States and the Asian region, a Cabinet Office official said.

The government’s assessment of the remaining components in the report remained unchanged.

(Reporting by Daniel Leussink; Editing by Ana Nicolaci da Costa and Kim Coghill)

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