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The Aston Martin Victor is the one-off hypercar we want the most

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Aston Martin early September took the covers off an incredible one-off GT car it built based on its multi-million dollar hypercar, the Vulcan. The British marque calls it the “Victor,” and it’s a total time warp.

The Victor rides on the same architecture as a One-77 or a Vulcan, but features an incredible bespoke carbon-fibre body styled after the Vantage models from the late ’70s and early ’80s.

The end result is a beautiful “backdated” GT car, with the bones of a race car. A regular Vulcan isn’t street-legal due to its lack of turn signals and things like that, but this car is. The Victor also shares its pushrod suspension with the Vulcan, as well as Brembo carbon-ceramic brakes and centre-lock alloy wheels.

The Victor is powered by a 7.3-litre V12 also sourced from a One-77, but thanks to a tune-up by Cosworth, it now produces 848 horsepower and 606 lb.-ft. of torque. To make it the ultimate GT, the engine sends its power to the rear wheels only via a six-speed manual gearbox built by Graziano.

The interior follows the theme of grand touring, with beautiful Weir leather, cashmere, exposed carbon fibre and machined aluminum. The shifter is also semi-exposed, and features a timber-wood knob and a solid machined lever.

The Victor was built by Aston Martin’s in-house Q division for one very special customer, and there isn’t likely to be a run of these, begging the question: What did it cost? Well, if you have to ask—

Source: – Driving

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Why were the PS5 and Xbox Series X pre-orders so chaotic? – The Next Web

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Buying a new, next-generation console is supposed to be an exciting thing. But this generation, pre-orders for the two upcoming consoles, the PlayStation 5 and the Xbox Series X, were more of a time for frustration and disappointment as the preorder periods for both consoles turned into complete fiascos. So what happened?

The PlayStation 5 pre-orders were the first to launch — prematurely, apparently. While pre-orders were supposed to start on September 17, they actually went live on September 16 with almost no warning. Within minutes, both versions of the PS5 were sold out everywhere, and even those who thought they’d managed to snag one would find it vanishing from their carts. For those who’d made the dreadful mistake of eating dinner because they weren’t expecting the pre-orders to go live (such as myself) they completely missed even the opportunity to buy one.

Sony later apologized for the mess, saying it “could have been a lot smoother” (you don’t say) and promising to release more of the consoles for pre-order. Let’s hope that’s true because, according to Press Start’s Shannon Grixti, at least one retailer has already sold their total 2020 stock. One wonders if the company is having to scramble to make more PS5s, as initial reports said it’d limit supplies at launch.

Microsoft officials were quick to chuckle and say that their launch wouldn’t be quite such a mess, but they were apparently a little too quick to say so. The Xbox Series launch was just as bad, if not worse.

At least two retailers — Best Buy and Amazon, of all places — didn’t launch the preorder option on the consoles until well after the start time. Amazon didn’t even have a page for the Xbox Series X ready to go. In fact, while the report is somewhat dubious, it appears enough buyers were confused about the lack of an Xbox Series X option that they accidentally bought the similarly named Xbox One X (see, this is why names like this are foolish, Microsoft). I’m told that GameStop would put players in a preorder queue and would warn them not to refresh the page lest they lose their place, only to keep them stuck in purgatory while the consoles sold out.

Read: Are EVs too expensive? Here are 5 common myths, debunked

And in the case of both consoles, we now have scalpers selling their preorders on eBay for ridiculous markups. If I tell you nothing else in this article, let me tell you this: don’t buy one of those.

What the heck happened here? Why did the launch of these consoles, what should have been one of the most meticulously well-planned events from two of the biggest companies in the world, turn into such a shitshow?

Personally, I put at least some of this down to sloppy planning on the part of both companies. I’m not sure if I believe the rumor that both companies were waiting for the other to announce a release date first, but it is worth noting that the first release date was revealed through a leak. The Xbox Series release dates were leaked ahead of time, forcing Microsoft to finally give an official date of release far, far later than they reasonably should have. Sony followed up with the PS5’s release date shortly afterwards. It would make a depressing amount of sense for the launches to be this haphazard if the companies really did wait until the last minute to set the dates.

There’s also another explanation, which would put this outside the companies’ control: scalpers used bots to buy the console specifically for resale before any human customers managed to get in. This theory was expanded upon by Kotaku’s Luke Plunkett, who described the bots as “software that’s able to crawl a site’s store page and complete multiple sales before actual human fingertips have had time to even move a mouse cursor onto the thing they want.” If that’s the case, let me reiterate — do not buy from scalpers. It’s worth waiting a few weeks or even months after launch to hold onto your money and integrity.

Let’s hope both companies can restock. Until then, lots of us who didn’t manage to snag one of the consoles will just have to wait.

So you like TNW? Then join our upcoming online event, TNW2020, you don’t want to miss it.

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MWC Barcelona 2021 rescheduled for June – GSMArena.com news – GSMArena.com

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The Mobile World Conference in Barcelona is traditionally taking place in the last week of February or the first week of March. Due to COVID-19, MWC 2020 was cancelled, and now the GSM Association announced next-year’s version is scheduled to take place between June 28 and July 1, 2021.

It is a bit sad that journalists, mobile company employees, partners and guests won’t visit the Spanish city in its off-season period, but MWC is keeping the announcement schedule on point – the last week of February will see the MWC Shanghai 2021 take place – the official dates are February 23-25.

The conference in the Chinese city is aimed at Asia Pacific markets and brands that usually don’t make it to Barcelona.

John Hoffman, CEO of GSM Association said in a press release that partners and clients remained dedicated to ensuring MWC21 Barcelona is a success. According to him, the conference is “an experience that brings the whole industry together.”

Switching the dates between Shanghai and Barcelona is a way to keep the annual cycle of events going on, since the MWC Los Angeles 2021 will remain as planned – at the end of October.

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Galaxy S20 FE isn't a revolution in mobile tech, but it's what 2020 calls for – CNET

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Samsung

Samsung’s Galaxy Note 20 Ultra and S20 Ultra might be packed to the hilt with the latest, greatest tech, but they also come with sky-high prices to match. That makes them a tricky sell at a time when purse strings are tightening and rivals like OnePlus are making great phones at more affordable prices. The Galaxy S20 FE (which stands for “fan edition”) aims to offer much of what you’ll find in the company’s top-end phones but with a few tweaks here and there in order to keep the price down. 


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That price is $700 — the same as the iPhone 11. In the UK and Australia, it’s £599 or AU$999 for a 4G version, and £699 or AU$1,149 for 5G. (Only the 5G version will be offered in the US.) That’s a significant price drop, given that the 5G Galaxy Note 20 Ultra retails for $1,300 (£1,179, AU$1,999). It also undercuts the OnePlus 8 Pro, which has a similar set of specs but costs $899 (£799). So much for OnePlus’ famous affordability.

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Samsung

The price might be more affordable, but the key specs don’t seem to have suffered all that much. There’s a 6.5-inch, 2,400×1,080-pixel super AMOLED display with a 120Hz refresh rate for smooth scrolling and a lightning-fast Snapdragon 865 processor (for the 5G models; there’s an Exynos 990 chip in the 4G models — the same one found in the Note 20 Ultra and S20 Ultra). 

There’s a triple camera setup on the back, although the resolutions are lower and it lacks high-end features like the 100x space zoom (30x zoom is offered, but it relies heavily on digital zoom) or 8K video recording, neither of which I think you’ll miss. It still offers things like 3x optical zoom, optical image stabilization, night mode photos and the “single take” feature which captures multiple versions of the same shot when you hit the shutter button (zoomed in, zoomed out, a video, a GIF, different filters) allowing you to decide which to share afterwards. 

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Samsung

Physically, it looks much the same as the rest of the S20 series. It has a Gorilla Glass 5 display (rather than Gorilla Glass 6 on the Note 20), and the back is made from a toughened, matte plastic rather than shiny glass. It still has IP68 waterproofing though, along with an in-screen fingerprint scanner and it’s available in a wider range of snazzy colors, including a vibrant red, a lavender purple, navy blue, mint green and orange — all of which look much nicer than the sinfully dull gray on Samsung’s most expensive S20 Ultra.

The phone is available for preorder globally from Wednesday, with in-store sales starting on Oct 2. 

No, this phone isn’t a revolution in mobile technology, but that’s not what Samsung needs to do right now. What it should be doing is offering a solid all-round experience at a more attractive price, which on paper at least is exactly what the S20 FE provides. We’ll find out how it stacks up against similarly priced competitors like the OnePlus 8 Pro in the full review, but for now you can see how its specs compare in the chart below.

Samsung Galaxy S20 FE specs comparison chart

Samsung Galaxy S20 FE Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra OnePlus 8 Pro Apple iPhone SE (2020)
Display size, resolution 6.5-inch super AMOLED; 2,400×1,080 pixels 6.9-inch Dynamic AMOLED 2X 6.78-inch AMOLED; 1,440×3,168 pixels 4.7-inch Retina HD; 1,334×750 pixels
Pixel density 405ppi 511ppi 513ppi 326ppi
Dimensions (inches) TBA 2.99 by 6.57 by 0.35 in. 6.51 by 2.93 by 0.35 in. 5.45 by 2.65 by 0.29 in.
Dimensions (millimeters) 159.8 by 75.5 by 8.4mm 76.0 by 166.9 by 8.8mm 165 by 74.4 by 8.5mm 138.4 by 67.3 by 7.3 mm
Weight (ounces, grams) 190g 7.76 oz.; 220g 199g 5.22 oz.; 148g
Mobile software Android 10 Android 10 Android 10 iOS 13
Camera 12-megapixel (standard), 12-megapixel (ultrawide), 8-megapixel (3x telephoto) 108-megapixel (wide-angle), 48-megapixel (telephoto), 12-megapixel (ultrawide), time-of-flight camera 48-megapixel main, 8-megapixel telephoto, 48-megapixel ultrawide, 5-megapixel “color filter” 12-megapixel
Front-facing camera 32-megapixel 40-megapixel 16-megapixel 7-megapixel
Video capture 4K 8K 4K 4K
Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 (5G) Samsung Exynos 990 (4G) 64-bit octa-core processor (Max 2.7GHz + 2.5GHz + 2GHz) Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 Apple A13 Bionic
Storage 128GB 128GB, 512GB 128GB, 256B 64GB, 128GB, 256GB
RAM 6GB 12GB, 16GB 8GB, 12GB Not disclosed
Expandable storage 1TB Up to 1TB None No
Battery 4,500 mAh 5,000 mAh 4,300 mAh Not disclosed, but Apple claims it has the same battery life as iPhone 8
Fingerprint sensor In-screen In-screen In-screen Home button
Connector USB-C USB-C USB-C Lightning
Headphone jack No No No No
Special features 120Hz screen refresh rate, support for 30W fast charging and 15W fast wireless charging 5G enabled; 120Hz refresh rate; 100X zoom; water resistant (IP68) 5G enabled, Fast-charging, fast wireless charging, 120Hz display Water resistant (IP67); dual-SIM capabilities (nano-SIM and e-SIM); wireless charging
Price off-contract (USD) $699 $1,399 (128GB), $1,599 (512GB) $899 $399 (64GB), $449 (128GB), $549 (256GB)
Price (GBP) £599 (4G), £699 (5G) £1,199 (128GB), £1,399 (512GB) £799 £419 (64GB), £469 (128GB), £569 (256GB)
Price (AUD) AU$999 (4G), AU$1,149 (5G) AU$1,999 (128GB), AU$2,249 (512GB) AU$1,435 converted AU$749 (64GB), AU$829 (128GB), AU$999 (256GB)

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