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Uber and Lyft in Vancouver: Operations start about 24 hours after approval announced | CTV News – CTV News

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VANCOUVER —
Uber and Lyft began operating in parts of Metro Vancouver Friday, about 24 hours after getting approval from the Passenger Transportation Board.

Both ride-hailing companies turned on their apps at about 8 a.m. in Vancouver, which is the only city they had business licences for at that time. 

“Good news, the wait for Uber is over! Uber will launch today to connect riders with reliable and affordable rides in Metro Vancouver,” Uber said in a news release Friday morning. “Residents and visitors alike will now have more transportation options to get them to their destination.”

Lyft held a news conference early Friday morning to announce its launch.

“We are very excited to bring Lyft’s ride sharing service to British Columbia,” Lyft B.C.’s general manager, Peter Lukomskyj said. “We want to thank the provincial government, we want to thank the PTB … for all their dedication in putting together the frameworks and executing those frameworks to make all this possible.”

Both companies charge 33 cents per minute, but Uber’s per-kilometre rate is 70 cents, while Lyft’s is 65 cents. Base and services fees for Uber are $4.50 compared with Lyft’s $5.

While it approved the two ride hailing companies Thursday, PTB declined approval for ReRyde Technologies Inc. and Kater Technologies Inc. for several B.C. regions that same day. 

Where are rides available?

To start off, Lyft is limiting its operations to what it’s calling the “core” of Vancouver, which is defined by boundaries at Dunbar to the west, Victoria Drive to the east and 41st Avenue in the south. It’ll also offer rides to Vancouver International Airport and the PNE.

“What we’re doing today is matching our operating region with the number of drivers that we have on the platform,” Lukomskyj said. 

“What we want to do is expand that region as quickly as possible as soon as we have enough drivers on the platform that we feel that we can meet those high-level standards of low wait times for our passengers and keeping our drivers as busy as possible.”

On its website, Uber shows a wider operating radius than Lyft, but the ride hailing company doesn’t have business licences secured outside Vancouver yet. For the time being, however, Uber will operate throughout the entire city of Vancouver, with no restrictions. 

For those using ride sharing at YVR, only three pick up areas can be used: international arrivals, domestic arrivals and the south terminal. Passengers can be dropped off anywhere at the airport, however.  

‘Be patient with the service’

What’s still unclear is how many drivers have been able to sign up with the businesses so far, as the PTB requires that all ride hail drivers have a Class 4 licence

“We do know that the Class 4 licence requirement does make it more difficult for driers to get through the process,” Michael van Hemmen, Uber’s head of Western Canada, said. 

“And so we ask for people to be patient with the service at first as there will be a period of time that it will take to adjust to the system.” 

Long road to ride hailing

B.C.’s government introduced ride hailing legislation last year, but it still took months for companies to get operational approval from the PTB. 

Claire Trevena, the transportation minister, told reporters in November that she was “very confident” ride hailing would be in place by Christmas. 

Then in December, just days before Christmas, CTV News received a statement from Trevena echoing those same words.

By New Year’s Eve, only one ride-hailing company – which plans to mostly operate in resort towns like Whistler – had received approval from the PTB.  

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YVR International Airport announces three designated "rideshare" areas | Urbanized – Daily Hive

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On Thursday morning, the provincial Passenger Transportation Board (PTB) announced that it had officially approved applications for ride-hailing operators Lyft and Uber.

On Friday, both Lyft and Uber officially started operations on Vancouver roads. The YVR Vancouver International Airport has also announced that ride app services are now authorized to operate in and out of the airport.

“Ride App services at YVR are highly regulated,” reads the airport website. The following three areas of the airport have been designated as “pick-up” areas:

  • International Arrivals, Level 2
  • Domestic Arrivals, Level 2
  • South Terminal

As far as drop-offs go, ridesharing vehicles will use the same drop-off areas that taxis and other vehicles use.

The airport also says that it will be open to other ridesharing vehicles as they receive approval from the PTB.

“The airport is open to having other operators; we’re not limiting it,” Andrew Grams, Director, Parking & Ground Transportation at the Vancouver Airport Authority, tells Daily Hive. “What we need to have first is that provincial licensing has to occur and then we’ll work towards an operating agreement.”

The YVR International Airport is located on federal-owned land outside of city municipalities, which is why rideshare is able to operate at the airport despite being located in Richmond.

“The airport approves its own ground transportation outside of the municipal licensing program,” adds Grams. “We grant them their own licence to operate.”

As far as where companies like Uber and Lyft will be able to take airport passengers, Grams says that customers should be able to book rides around the Lower Mainland, although they should double-check their respective apps for confirmation.

“We were planning this for quite some time,” he says. “We like to think that we have the operation fairly set in terms of what the big pieces are.”

Grams also notes that there are “lots of staff” who will be available to help customers and that they’ll be “ready for when the volumes increase.”

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Ride-hailing 101: What you need to know to ride Uber and Lyft in Metro Vancouver – Global News

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It’s official, the ride-hailing rubber has hit the road in parts of Metro Vancouver with the launch of Uber and Lyft on Friday.

The region is the last major city in North America to get the service, and as a result, many residents may be unfamiliar with how it works.


READ MORE:
Uber, Lyft given green light to operate in B.C.’s Lower Mainland

Here’s a basic guide on how the services work, along with some specific information on how they will operate in the region.

FILE- In this Jan. 31, 2018, file photo, a Lyft driver opens the Lyft app on his phone while waiting for a fare in Pittsburgh. Lyft is lifting the price target for its initial public offering in a sign of the excitement surrounding the stock market debut of a ride-hailing service that’s gaining ground on its rival Uber. With the revision disclosed Wednesday, March 27, 2019, Lyft is now seeking $70 to $72 per share, up from its previous goal of $62 to $68. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

FILE- In this Jan. 31, 2018, file photo, a Lyft driver opens the Lyft app on his phone while waiting for a fare in Pittsburgh. Lyft is lifting the price target for its initial public offering in a sign of the excitement surrounding the stock market debut of a ride-hailing service that’s gaining ground on its rival Uber. With the revision disclosed Wednesday, March 27, 2019, Lyft is now seeking $70 to $72 per share, up from its previous goal of $62 to $68. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)


(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

Getting started

Before you can hail a ride with Lyft or Uber, you’ll need to download the app, either from the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store.

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Users will need to enter valid a credit card number into the app before they can use it.

From there, punch in your destination, select the type of vehicle you want, and where you need to be picked up from.

The app will show you the cost of your ride before you approve it.






1:30
Uber, Lyft begin operating in Vancouver


Uber, Lyft begin operating in Vancouver

Areas of service

Both Uber and Lyft have provincial authorization to work in the entirety of “Region 1,” which includes Metro Vancouver, the Fraser Valley and the Squamish-Lillooet corridor.

But the companies are initially launching with very different areas of service.


READ MORE:
First rideshare company approved to operate in B.C., Lyft and Uber still waiting for decision

Uber

Uber has launched with the larger coverage area of the two companies.

The entirety of the City of Vancouver and UBC, the City of Richmond, Burnaby, New Westminster and the Tri-Cities are within its coverage area.

Virtually all of North Vancouver is covered, as is a large portion of Surrey and Delta and about half of of West Vancouver.

Uber’s initial service area.

Uber’s initial service area.


Uber

Lyft

Lyft is launching with a much smaller service area that includes what the company is calling the “core of Vancouver.”

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Service in Vancouver will be bounded by Dunbar Street in the west, 41st Avenue in the south and Victoria Drive in the east.

The company will also pick up at the PNE fairgrounds and the Vancouver International Airport.

Lyft’s initial service area.

Lyft’s initial service area.


Lyft

Base fares

Uber

  • Booking fee — $2
  • Base fare — $2.50
  • Per km — $0.70
  • Per min. — $0.33

Lyft

  • Minimum fare — $5
  • Base fare — $2.50
  • Service fee — $2.50
  • Per km — $0.65
  • Per min. — $0.33

Taxi

  • Flag rate — $3.37
  • Per km — $1.93
  • Per min. — $0.57

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Airport and ferries

Vancouver International Airport 

YVR has limited ride-hailing pickups from both companies to three specific areas. “Ride App” signs are posted in the designated pickup areas.

Passengers hailing a ride can pick it up at:

  • International Arrivals, Level 2
  • Domestic Arrivals, Level 2
  • South Terminal

Drivers are stationed in a separate waiting area, and passengers are asked to collect all of their luggage before booking a ride.

There are no specific drop-off points for ride-hailing vehicles. Passengers can be dropped off at any permitted unloading area at the airport.


READ MORE:
B.C.’s Passenger Transportation Board to issue ride-hail licences in ‘late’ 2019

BC Ferries

Both Horseshoe Bay and the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal are outside of the Lyft and and Uber service area for pickups.

The company says it would welcome the service at both Metro Vancouver terminals.

When service expands, it says vehicles would use the regular pick-up and drop-off areas.

Driving for Uber or Lyft

You can see full Vancouver driver requirements for Uber here and Lyft here.

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Here are the key requirements would-be drivers will need to meet.

  • Be at least 21 years old, have a valid Class 4 driver’s licence
  • Have proof of work eligibility
  • Have proof of vehicle registration and insurance
  • Complete background screening (driving history and criminal record check)
  • Own a vehicle that meets minimum requirements. Uber vehicles must be 2011 models or newer, Lyft vehicles must be 2010 models or newer.
  • Complete vehicle inspection

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China Virus Fears Send Oil Prices Even Lower – OilPrice.com

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China Virus Fears Send Oil Prices Even Lower | OilPrice.com

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana is a writer for Oilprice.com with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and SeeNews. 

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    Coronavirus

    Oil prices were down early on Friday for a fourth consecutive session, as fears of the deadly Chinese virus spreading and concerns about oil demand trumped supply outages and set prices on course for a 5-percent weekly loss.

    Oil prices hit their lowest since late November early on Friday. As of 09:52 a.m. EDT on Friday, WTI Crude was down 1.89 percent at US$54.54, while Brent Crude traded down 1.73 percent at US$60.22.

    This week started on the bullish note for oil prices, after a port blockade in Libya that began in the weekend threatened to cut off the entire oil production of OPEC’s African member. The market was concerned, for a few hours, about the implications of a 1.2-million-bpd supply outage.

    But then on Tuesday, despite the continued blockade in Libya, oil prices started to slip as market participants became jittery over the deadly virus in China, which, analysts say, could cut oil demand as travel restrictions in and around the area of the outbreak are already in place.

    The SARS CoV, better known as the SARS Coronavirus, is highly contagious, and Goldman Sachs estimates that the oil market could see a drop of 260,000 barrels per day in the global oil demand market—170,000 bpd of which would be in the form of jet fuel. Goldman Sachs analysts expect that demand erosion to translate into nearly US$3 a barrel decline in oil prices.

    Since Goldman came up with that estimate, oil prices have already dropped by more than US$3 a barrel.  

    On Thursday, oil prices continued to fall and not even a modest crude oil inventory draw of 400,000 barrels for the week to January 17 managed to move prices higher.

    “Like much of last year, this latest development illustrates well that the market continues to focus more on macro events, rather than specific market fundamentals – the downward price action a result of the virus more than offsetting the gains seen following Libyan supply disruptions,” ING strategists Warren Patterson and Wenyu Yao said on Friday.  

    “One would also think the supply losses from Libya would far outweigh the potential demand losses from the Wuhan virus,” they added.

    By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

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