Connect with us

Business

WHO lists Pfizer-BioNTech COVID vaccine for emergency use – Al Jazeera English

Published

 on


UN health agency says emergency use listing ‘opens the door’ for countries to expedite their vaccine approval processes.

The World Health Organization has listed Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use, a critical step that the United Nations health agency said aims to make the vaccine more readily available in developing nations.

In a statement on Thursday, WHO said its validation of the vaccine – the first since the start of the pandemic – “opens the door for countries to expedite their own regulatory approval processes to import and administer the vaccine”.

It will also allow groups, such as UNICEF and the Pan-American Health Organization, “to procure the vaccine for distribution to countries in need”, the WHO said.

“This is a very positive step towards ensuring global access to COVID-19 vaccines,” Dr Mariangela Simao, WHO assistant director-general for access to medicines and health products, said in the statement.

“But I want to emphasize the need for an even greater global effort to achieve enough vaccine supply to meet the needs of priority populations everywhere.”

Boxes of Pfizer-BioNtech COVID-19 vaccines arrive at an undisclosed location in Nicosia, Cyprus, December 26, 2020. [Stavros Ioannides/PIO/Handout via Reuters]

WHO said the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine met its safety requirements and its benefits outweighed any potential risks.

The vaccine, which must be kept at ultra-low temperatures, is already being administered in several countries, including the United States, Canada, Qatar, Bahrain and Mexico.

Human rights groups have raised concerns about richer countries “hoarding” vaccines at the expense of developing nations.

A recent report by Amnesty International found that all of Moderna Inc’s COVID-19 vaccines and 96 percent of Pfizer-BioNtech’s doses had been secured by rich countries, including Canada, the United Kingdom and the US.

“Many countries have seen the vaccine, understandably so, as their way out of this crisis and it’s been a race,” Stephen Cockburn, head of economic and social justice at Amnesty, told Al Jazeera this month.

“Rather than work together, we’ve had a ‘me first’ attitude in many countries and there’s been a lack of multilateralism and global coordination in the world.”

Healthcare workers hold syringes with the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at the University Hospital in Nitra, Slovakia, December 26, 2020 [Radovan Stoklasa/Reuters]

Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director John Nkengasong also warned that Africa might not see vaccines until after the second quarter of 2021.

Nkengasong called it a “moral issue” and urged the UN to summon a special session to discuss the ethical and fair distribution of vaccines to avoid “this North-South distrust in respect to vaccines, which is a common good”.

The UN health agency, with the GAVI Vaccine Alliance and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), is spearheading a global effort called COVAX to secure and distribute vaccines to poorer countries, to ensure shots do not go only to wealthy nations.

The WHO-backed COVAX alliance has agreements for nearly two billion doses, with first deliveries due in early 2021.

The alliance has been in talks with Pfizer and BioNTech to secure vaccine.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Global National: Jan. 15, 2021 | COVID-19 vaccines delayed after manufacturing expansion – Global News

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

  1. Global National: Jan. 15, 2021 | COVID-19 vaccines delayed after manufacturing expansion  Global News
  2. Pfizer to temporarily reduce vaccine deliveries to Canada, minister says  CBC.ca
  3. Pfizer is cutting shipments to Canada | How will the COVID-19 vaccination strategy be impacted?  CTV News
  4. COVID-19 Update: Snowbirds head to Florida for shots | Pfizer delay a setback for Alberta | Drumheller inmates go on hunger strike  Calgary Herald
  5. Pfizer delays delivery of COVID-19 vaccines  CityNews Toronto
  6. View Full coverage on Google News



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

B.C. faces tough choices as near-term Pfizer vaccine shipments cut in half – Global News

Published

 on


British Columbia health officials are working to determine how to prioritize who gets a COVID-19 immunization, amid a reduction in shipments of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine they admit will have a significant effect.

Pfizer has announced a temporary delay in shipments of the vaccine as it scales up its European production centre.

Read more:
‘Temporary delay’ chops Canada’s deliveries of Pfizer vaccine in half for four weeks

That means that the 50,000-dose shipment British Columbia was expecting in February will be slashed in half.


Click to play video 'Ottawa reassures Canadians after announcement of COVID-19 vaccine delay'



2:09
Ottawa reassures Canadians after announcement of COVID-19 vaccine delay


Ottawa reassures Canadians after announcement of COVID-19 vaccine delay

“In some sectors the delivery will be delayed and that is just the reality we face,” Dix told Global News on Friday.

Story continues below advertisement

“What it will really affect is the February and March period … it obviously impacts the priority groups and second doses as well.”

Read more:
Pfizer vaccine delay a ‘blow,’ will affect Alberta’s vaccine schedule: health minister

Dix added that there was no interruption in the supply of the Moderna vaccine, and that the delay would have little effect on Pfizer shipments next week.


Click to play video 'Focus BC: Vaccine rollout, long term care strategy during the pandemic'



23:52
Focus BC: Vaccine rollout, long term care strategy during the pandemic


Focus BC: Vaccine rollout, long term care strategy during the pandemic

In an interview with Global’s Focus BC, provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said her team was working to determine who will and won’t get their shot in that time period.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

Officials must weigh whether to skip some front-line workers who are still waiting for their shot, or to extend the time period between when each person receives their first and second dose.

Story continues below advertisement

Pfizer guidelines call for the doses to be administered 21 days apart, while Canada’s vaccine advisory committee has recommended vaccines be given a maximum of 42 days after the first.

Quebec is considering spreading the doses by as many as 90 days.

Read more:
Coronavirus: New vaccine appointments paused in Manitoba as Pfizer announces delay

“People need to be reassured that even after 48 days and longer, it does not just drop off dramatically,” Henry said.

“We will look at how much vaccine is coming in, how many people are due to get their vaccine in that week (when) we will have less, and then we will have to make decisions on we have to optimize who gets vaccine at that time.”


Click to play video 'How will I know it’s my turn to get the vaccine? Your COVID-19 questions answered'



10:45
How will I know it’s my turn to get the vaccine? Your COVID-19 questions answered


How will I know it’s my turn to get the vaccine? Your COVID-19 questions answered

Henry said the silver lining of the temporary delay in doses was that the work Pfizer is doing at its plant will allow it to produce more vaccine down the road, some of which will come to British Columbia.

Story continues below advertisement

As of Friday, B.C. had given at least one dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine to nearly 76,000 people.

The province has concentrated distribution of its first doses of vaccine to front-line health-care workers, those working and living in long-term care facilities and First Nations communities.

Federal Procurement Minister Anita Anand said Friday the issues at Pfizer’s Belgium plant would result in an be an “unfortunate” situation where Canada would see its expected shipment of vaccine in February cut in half.

— With files from Richard Zussman and the Canadian Press

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Pfizer is cutting shipments to Canada | How will the COVID-19 vaccination strategy be impacted? – CTV News

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

  1. Pfizer is cutting shipments to Canada | How will the COVID-19 vaccination strategy be impacted?  CTV News
  2. Pfizer to temporarily reduce vaccine deliveries to Canada, minister says  CBC.ca
  3. Canada’s coming month of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine shipments will be reduced by half  CTV News
  4. Why were US media silent on Pfizer vaccine deaths?: Global Times editorial  Global Times
  5. 39 active COVID-19 cases in Medicine Hat, 5000th recovery in South Zone  CHAT News Today
  6. View Full coverage on Google News



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending