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Why Canada Continues to Attract Real Estate Investors

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Real estate experts, foreign investors, and Canada’s citizens unanimously agree that Canada has everything it takes to create better living opportunities and, therefore, become one of the most sought-after destinations globally. Besides, real estate in Canada is competitively priced, vast, and has a reasonable appreciation rate. The hassle-free legal system in Canada is another reason why foreign investors flock to Canada. A comparative study of real estate in the UK, US, Spain, or France will help you realize that Canadian real estate is not very expensive. You will find cheaper land in Canada and a myriad of real estate options to invest in.

 

As the Canadian economy strengthens, more people are expected to migrate to this country, leading to a rise in demand for properties. According to real estate experts, this growing demand will boost the property values radically in years to come. In contrast to the high standard of living, Canada’s cost is lower than in many other countries. In Canada, foreign investors can buy cold properties that they probably couldn’t have afforded in their own countries. The most significant advantage is that you don’t have to be a resident of Canada to purchase property in the country. This puts foreign investors in an enviable position to invest in a higher quality purchase in Canada than their homelands. Owing to the abundant land available, overcrowding will never be an issue in this incredibly beautiful country. Besides, Canada has a diverse property portfolio that can please even the most fastidious buyer.

The best part of being a foreign investor is that you virtually get to enjoy almost all the privileges and benefits as any other citizen and yet, not go through the painful ordeal of applying for immigration acceptance. Thus, as a foreign investor, you can open a bank account in the country and have your land and car. Alternatively, you can make Canada your new home by permanently settling in this country like millions of Europeans who have already decided here. This explains why Canada is the third most popular emigration destination. The ever-increasing popularity of Canada will continue to attract more people in the future. This popularity of Canada among expatriates ensures a steady supply of money in the property market.

A quick look at the figures mentioned below will throw light on the Canadian property market’s past performance. Listed below are the rising prices of a single-family home in Vancouver:

 

  • 1961 – CAD $13,500

 

  • 1974 – CAD $48,000

 

  • 1982 – CAD $120,000

 

  • 2007 – CAD $475,000

 

Canada provides excellent rental opportunities for real estate investors. Thus, if you purchase apartments and townhouses in some of the hottest areas in Canada, you can enjoy a steady income and cash flow in the form of rent. This allows you to enjoy capital appreciation and build equity in the long run. No matter what the reason may be for your investment, Canada has an effortless buying procedure, and you can close a property deal in a short time.

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ROGER TAYLOR: CPP's investment head says sticking with oil and gas companies will help wind, solar development – Cape Breton Post

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Climate change is important to the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, but it’s not ready to divest of its holdings in conventional oil and gas.

Although a segment of the Canadian population may want the CPPIB to drop conventional energy, the board’s top spokesman says its investment decisions are not necessarily motivated by politics or a change in public policy.

Michel Leduc, CPPIB senior managing director and global head of public affairs and communications, said in a phone interview on Monday that conventional energy sources are not going away as quickly as some people may believe, and oil and gas will have a role in the global economy for some time to come.

Michel Leduc is senior managing director and global head of public affairs and communications at the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board. – Contributed

It is the investment board’s view that conventional oil and gas is still a good investment, providing a good return for years to come, said Leduc, and the board will maintain such investments.

The conventional oil and gas companies are making the switch to unconventional wind and solar energy themselves, Leduc argued, so if the CPPIB was to cut its investment in such companies it would actually help slow the transition from conventional to renewable energy.

The subject of energy may come up again Tuesday when Leduc hosts a CPPIB virtual town hall for Nova Scotians, during which he will explain what the investment board is doing with its $430-billion fund.

Every second year, the CPPIB holds public meetings individually for each province and the northern territories throughout October. Nova Scotia is the second last of year’s presentations.

There are a total of 20 million CPP contributors and beneficiaries in Canada and, of that, there are 461,799 contributors and 220,693 retirement beneficiaries in Nova Scotia.

Leduc said that despite the economic concern brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, the solvency and sustainability of the Canada Pension Plan is on solid footing for at least the next 75 years.

Before the creation of the CPPIB in 1997, the Canada Pension Plan was 100 per cent invested in government debt, Leduc said. To better prepare for so-called black swan events, such as a pandemic, the investment board has diversified the fund.

The fund is invested in three broad categories: 20 per cent in fixed income, which is mainly sovereign bonds and provincial bonds; 53 per cent in equities, both publicly traded stocks and private companies wholly controlled by the CPPIB; and the remainder would be in real assets, which includes toll roads, commercial real estate and ports, which provide steady income for a long period.

Geographically, only about 15 per cent of the CPPIB’s investments are in Canada, Leduc said, and about 85 per cent is invested across the developed economies of the world.

Considering that Canada represents only about three per cent of global markets, most of the CPPIB investments are outside of the country to be fully diversified and protect the fund from downturns in the Canadian economy.

The largest portion of the outside investments are in the United States, followed by Europe, Japan, South Korea and then developing countries, which includes China, India, Brazil, Mexico, Chile and Colombia.

In Canada, the fund is invested in both conventional and renewable energy, the financial sector and technology, including Ottawa-based tech darling Shopify, Leduc said.

The CPPIB has a 50 per cent holding in the 401 toll highway in Ontario, which has proven to be the investment board’s biggest return on investment so far, he said.

In Nova Scotia, the fund has investments in Empire Co. Ltd., parent of the Sobeys grocery chain, and Crombie REIT, both of which are controlled by the founding Sobey family of Pictou County.

Internationally, the CPPIB owns 23 ports in the United Kingdom, which also provide steady income over a long period.


CPPIB VIRTUAL TOWN HALL

The virtual Canada Pension Plan Investment Board town halls are accessed at cppinvestments.com/publicmeetings. The Nova Scotia session is scheduled for today from noon to 1 p.m.

To join, click the link for the meeting and register with an email address. Registrants will get a response and can submit a question in advance.

In Nova Scotia, 461,799 residents are CPP contributors (47.9 per cent of the provincial population) and 220,693 are CPP retirement beneficiaries (22.9 per cent of the population).

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Jarvis: A massive, game-changing investment – Windsor Star

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Article content continued

So the third shift is forecast to return in 2024, when mass production of the new vehicle begins. All 425 workers still laid off are expected to have the opportunity to be recalled plus another 1,500 are expected to be hired.

Here’s the but.

Workers will have to weather more layoffs before more jobs come back.

“We’ve got another down week coming. That’s already been announced,” said Dias. “I wish I could say with conviction that everything is going to be fine after the down week, but I really can’t say that.”

Everything is tied to consumer demand. Minivan sales are stable now, he said, “but it’s not like it was.”

There are also questions about the investment, said Automotive News Canada reporter John Irwin.

Normally, when negotiations lead to a new investment, that investment happens before the contract expires. Mass production of the new vehicle announced as part of this contract won’t start until 2024, after the contract expires.

But retooling for the new product will start in 2023, before the contract expires, Dias said.

The auto industry makes these decisions four to five years in advance, he said.

“If we had waited another three years to talk about this investment, it probably would have been in Mexico,” he said.

The agreement also doesn’t identify the vehicle to be produced, only that it will be a plug-in hybrid “and/or” battery-powered electric vehicle.

A key feature is that the platform will be flexible enough to build cars, crossovers or pickups, Dias said.

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ROGER TAYLOR: CPP's investment head says sticking with oil and gas companies will help wind, solar development – The Journal Pioneer

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Climate change is important to the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, but it’s not ready to divest of its holdings in conventional oil and gas.

Although a segment of the Canadian population may want the CPPIB to drop conventional energy, the board’s top spokesman says its investment decisions are not necessarily motivated by politics or a change in public policy.

Michel Leduc, CPPIB senior managing director and global head of public affairs and communications, said in a phone interview on Monday that conventional energy sources are not going away as quickly as some people may believe, and oil and gas will have a role in the global economy for some time to come.

Michel Leduc is senior managing director and global head of public affairs and communications at the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board.  - Contributed
Michel Leduc is senior managing director and global head of public affairs and communications at the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board. – Contributed

It is the investment board’s view that conventional oil and gas is still a good investment, providing a good return for years to come, said Leduc, and the board will maintain such investments.

The conventional oil and gas companies are making the switch to unconventional wind and solar energy themselves, Leduc argued, so if the CPPIB was to cut its investment in such companies it would actually help slow the transition from conventional to renewable energy.

The subject of energy may come up again Tuesday when Leduc hosts a CPPIB virtual town hall for Nova Scotians, during which he will explain what the investment board is doing with its $430-billion fund.

Every second year, the CPPIB holds public meetings individually for each province and the northern territories throughout October. Nova Scotia is the second last of year’s presentations.

There are a total of 20 million CPP contributors and beneficiaries in Canada and, of that, there are 461,799 contributors and 220,693 retirement beneficiaries in Nova Scotia.

Leduc said that despite the economic concern brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, the solvency and sustainability of the Canada Pension Plan is on solid footing for at least the next 75 years.

Before the creation of the CPPIB in 1997, the Canada Pension Plan was 100 per cent invested in government debt, Leduc said. To better prepare for so-called black swan events, such as a pandemic, the investment board has diversified the fund.

The fund is invested in three broad categories: 20 per cent in fixed income, which is mainly sovereign bonds and provincial bonds; 53 per cent in equities, both publicly traded stocks and private companies wholly controlled by the CPPIB; and the remainder would be in real assets, which includes toll roads, commercial real estate and ports, which provide steady income for a long period.

Geographically, only about 15 per cent of the CPPIB’s investments are in Canada, Leduc said, and about 85 per cent is invested across the developed economies of the world.

Considering that Canada represents only about three per cent of global markets, most of the CPPIB investments are outside of the country to be fully diversified and protect the fund from downturns in the Canadian economy.

The largest portion of the outside investments are in the United States, followed by Europe, Japan, South Korea and then developing countries, which includes China, India, Brazil, Mexico, Chile and Colombia.

In Canada, the fund is invested in both conventional and renewable energy, the financial sector and technology, including Ottawa-based tech darling Shopify, Leduc said.

The CPPIB has a 50 per cent holding in the 401 toll highway in Ontario, which has proven to be the investment board’s biggest return on investment so far, he said.

In Nova Scotia, the fund has investments in Empire Co. Ltd., parent of the Sobeys grocery chain, and Crombie REIT, both of which are controlled by the founding Sobey family of Pictou County.

Internationally, the CPPIB owns 23 ports in the United Kingdom, which also provide steady income over a long period.


CPPIB VIRTUAL TOWN HALL

The virtual Canada Pension Plan Investment Board town halls are accessed at cppinvestments.com/publicmeetings. The Nova Scotia session is scheduled for today from noon to 1 p.m.

To join, click the link for the meeting and register with an email address. Registrants will get a response and can submit a question in advance.

In Nova Scotia, 461,799 residents are CPP contributors (47.9 per cent of the provincial population) and 220,693 are CPP retirement beneficiaries (22.9 per cent of the population).

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