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7 Celebrities Making Art In Quarantine – Forbes

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Forget the crazy celebrity videos, or even the paparazzi photos of masked-up stars getting groceries in the Hamptons. Who knew that so many celebrities would be getting creative in quarantine? Though some celeb-art stars are known for their artwork (like Anthony Hopkins and Sylvester Stallone), others have only recently discovered, and unveiled, their artistic masterpieces. Here are a few of them, some of which are great, others which are inevitably entertaining.

Heidi Klum: The Painterly Impressionist

The Making The Cut star and former supermodel is busy at work painting landscape portraits of trees (cherry blossoms?) while counting Damien Hirst and Julian Schnabel as inspiration. But isn’t it obvious that Claude Monet could also be counted as inspiration, too? This isn’t just this a one painting run, though, as Klum is working on other pieces, too. She has shared shots of her paint-marked cell phone, and asks her audience what to paint next.

Paris Hilton: Clearly, A Pop Artist

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Paris is many things, entrepreneur, DJ, perfume mogul. Now, she is a collage artist who is creating self-portraits. With glitter, rhinestones, paint and photos, she is showing a painting called I Dream of Paris, on view now at the Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, as part of Onch’s Sweet 16 group show. Hilton is clearly a pop artist, though of the selfie variety, and follows the lineage of artists like Andy Warhol and Claes Oldenberg. She is auctioning off her piece and donating the proceeds to charity. The auction is ongoing until August 15.

Sharon Stone: Paint By Numbers

The Basic Instinct star has fine-tuned her efforts as an artist under quarantine. She got a paint by numbers kit for her birthday, and is finally putting it to use. Upon completing the detailed painting of a pink flower, similar to a work we’d see by Georgia O’Keeffe. She explains in a video: “It actually looks like something.” Where is Bob Ross when you need him?

Sylvester Stallone: The Expressionist

The Rocky star has been busy in quarantine making art (he even has an Instagram account devoted exclusively to his art). The painting below is called On Her Own, Again. It calls to mind modern painting from the 1950s, as if Jackson Pollock and Wassily Kandinsky merged forces. The theme of heartbreak is common for Stallone’s artwork, as another one he created called When Love Hurts, is he describes as “the tumultuous sea of emotions one must navigate to find lasting love,” says Stallone.

Elle Fanning: The Cartoon Realist

The star of The Great recently posted a pair of drawings she made while she was shooting the pilot of the new Hulu series she stars in. Though they were created pre-quarantine, these drawings were shared only last week. They’re realist self-portraits, and call to mind the cartoons of Roz Chast, or if Daria was merged with the Powerpuff Girls. The drawings depict Fanning in her role as Catherine the Great, in full retro regalia, likely which is courtesy of the show’s costume designer, Emma Freyer.

Reese Witherspoon: Still Life

The famed type-A actress known for her powerhouse media company Hello Sunshine is learning how to paint with watercolors at home, thanks to art supplies gifted by her mother. She shared a still life painting of a vase with flowers, declaring: “I’m quitting my day job!” Though she isn’t using pointillism, this is somewhat Vincent Van Gogh meets Paul Cezanne.

Anthony Hopkins: The Dramatist

The Welsh actor, composer and artist has recently come into the spotlight for his spooky paintings, some of which draw a parallel to some characters he has played onscreen. He recently gave a tour of his art studio, where he is self-quarantining. Some close ups of his paintings show incredible detail. His artwork calls to mind angular portraits by Egon Schiele or maybe if Marc Chagall was a cubist.

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TrepanierBaer offers glimpse of the 1980s work of 'Alberta art royalty' Carroll Taylor Lindoe – SaltWire Network

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Inspiration works in mysterious ways.

Roughly two years ago, an art collector contacted Yves Trepanier inquiring about a series of large-scale charcoal drawings by Carroll Taylor Lindoe, an artist his gallery represents. It turns out, the piece of art he was after wasn’t available. But it prompted Trepanier to look at his inventory of Taylor Lindoe’s work at TrepanierBaer. Eventually, a small exhibition was launched in April 2019 to introduce the artist to a new generation of art enthusiasts and collectors.

“People went crazy,” says Trepanier. “It was like ‘Wow, this is great: Carroll is back.’”

Still, few thought that the modest exhibition would prompt Taylor Lindoe to start creating again, including the artist herself. She had been retired from both teaching and her artistic practice since the early 2000s, when she moved with her husband to Denman Island off the coast of Vancouver Island.

On the phone with Postmedia earlier this week, the 72-year-old artist is taking a rare break from the fall harvesting of fruit and vegetables on her island home, where she has lived a somewhat reclusive life since 2003. She built a studio on the property not long after moving there, but over the years it had mostly been used for storage.

“This sort of life that we have here is something that I’ve always wanted,” Taylor Lindoe says. “It wasn’t that I was running away from my art practice so much as going to something that was close to my heart. But while I left my practice behind, it didn’t take much for the interest to open up that door into my mind again and get my mind thinking about art again and about the pleasure of making it.”

Taylor Lindoe, whose practice includes drawing, sculpture and painting, will not reveal specific details about what she has been creating this past year. Nor will Calgarians get a chance to see new pieces as part of Carroll Taylor Lindoe: Inch, Foot, Yard, Mile, her first solo show in two decades that runs until Oct. 10 at the TrepanierBaer. The works on display are mostly from the 1980s, a wildly productive period for the artist that found her immersed in a number of disciplines. That allowed her an eclectic approach, demonstrating a great sense of “geometry, architecture and abstraction with allusions to figure and landscape,” Trepanier says.

It’s a reminder of the place of prominence the artist held in Calgary’s art scene, which made her sudden disappearance from it nearly two decades ago all the more jarring, he says. Her family roots go back to early pioneers of Alberta and the pioneering western Canadian culture has always been “very much a part of my being,” she says. Her parents were also pioneers of sorts. Her father Luke Lindoe was a prominent ceramic artist, painter, sculptor and businessman. Her mother Vivian Lindoe was also a painter, printmaker and ceramist. The couple became part of a small, tight-knit group of post-war artists practising in Calgary.

“The artist’s community in the ’40s and ’50s was very much a pioneering community,” Taylor Lindoe says. “It was a small group of people. They were all very tied together, they all knew each other. There were no artist-run galleries until the 1970s. People showed where they could. Really it was a social group.”

Taylor Lindoe eventually studied at the Alberta College of Art and Design and taught there until she moved to B.C., inspiring generations of Calgary artists. She was married to Ron Moppett, a prominent Calgary painter. Their son, Damian, is also an artist currently living in Vancouver. In short, she is a part of “Alberta art royalty,” Trepanier says.

The exhibit at TrepanierBaer, while focused on a relatively brief period in Taylor Lindoe’s 40-year-career, showcases her versatility in sculpture, painting and drawings. They include everything from the 16-work Image Poem, a collection of ink on mylar and watercolour pieces inspired by an eye-opening trip to Macedonia in the 1980s, to Figure in Landscape with Black Stairs, a painted wood sculpture inspired by her walks through Calgary, to Untitled #4, a 1987 abstract charcoal drawing.

“She was moving around from one medium to another and was ahead of her time,” says Trepanier. “If you think back to how artists were 20, 30 years ago, if you were a painter you were a painter. You might fool around with something else, make some drawings or prints, but she really moved and there’s a cross-disciplinary interest, a flexibility in her work approach. It’s just the way she is. I think she gets bored if she just does one thing and plateaus there. She wants to get off and go onto the next thing.”

As for her next thing, Taylor Lindoe does not reveal too many details. This is not because she is being secretive, but because she has a hard time planning or predicting what will happen.

“It’s coming from the subconscious,” she says. “That part of a person is not very directable … There will always be a sense of place and there will always be a physicality and there will be a psychic reality to it. So whatever it is, however it gathers in on the work I’m doing, whether it’s drawing or paintings or sculptures, those elements will always be there.”

Carroll Taylor Lindoe: Inch, Foot, Yard, Mile runs until Oct. 11 at TrepanierBaer. Visit trepanierbaer.com

Copyright Postmedia Network Inc., 2020

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TrepanierBaer offers glimpse of the 1980s work of 'Alberta art royalty' Carroll Taylor Lindoe – Calgary Herald

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Article content continued

Carroll Taylor Lindoe's Image Poems on exhibit at TrepanierBear Gallery.
Carroll Taylor Lindoe’s Image Poems on exhibit at TrepanierBear Gallery. jpg

On the phone with Postmedia earlier this week, the 72-year-old artist is taking a rare break from the fall harvesting of fruit and vegetables on her island home, where she has lived a somewhat reclusive life since 2003. She built a studio on the property not long after moving there, but over the years it had mostly been used for storage.

“This sort of life that we have here is something that I’ve always wanted,” Taylor Lindoe says. “It wasn’t that I was running away from my art practice so much as going to something that was close to my heart. But while I left my practice behind, it didn’t take much for the interest to open up that door into my mind again and get my mind thinking about art again and about the pleasure of making it.”

Taylor Lindoe, whose practice includes drawing, sculpture and painting, will not reveal specific details about what she has been creating this past year. Nor will Calgarians get a chance to see new pieces as part of Carroll Taylor Lindoe: Inch, Foot, Yard, Mile, her first solo show in two decades that runs until Oct. 10 at the TrepanierBaer. The works on display are mostly from the 1980s, a wildly productive period for the artist that found her immersed in a number of disciplines. That allowed her an eclectic approach, demonstrating a great sense of “geometry, architecture and abstraction with allusions to figure and landscape,” Trepanier says.

Carroll Taylor Lindoe's Figure in Landscape, Black Stairs show on display at TrepanierBaer Gallery.
Carroll Taylor Lindoe’s Figure in Landscape, Black Stairs show on display at TrepanierBaer Gallery. jpg

It’s a reminder of the place of prominence the artist held in Calgary’s art scene, which made her sudden disappearance from it nearly two decades ago all the more jarring, he says. Her family roots go back to early pioneers of Alberta and the pioneering western Canadian culture has always been “very much a part of my being,” she says. Her parents were also pioneers of sorts. Her father Luke Lindoe was a prominent ceramic artist, painter, sculptor and businessman. Her mother Vivian Lindoe was also a painter, printmaker and ceramist. The couple became part of a small, tight-knit group of post-war artists practising in Calgary.

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City seeks Calgarians to pick operator of public art program – CBC.ca

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The City of Calgary is looking for four people to select an outside organization to operate its contentious public art program. 

Council decided last year to farm out operation of the program after years of controversy around projects and arguments over the best use of tax dollars. 

At that time, the city said the move could save money, reduce the number of city workers involved and possibly see more local artists win public art contracts. 

The new organization will operate at arm’s length from the city, in a system similar to Edmonton’s program. 

“We’ve never done this before in the City of Calgary, having our public art service operated by an arm’s length model, and we really want to make sure that we have Calgarians involved in that,” said Jennifer Thompson, the city’s acting manager of arts and culture. 

“So we’re looking for both subject matter experts in the arts and culture field as well as citizens at large. We’ve heard from Calgarians that they want more access to the public art program and they want our opportunities to participate.”

Thompson said there’s a backlog of projects stemming from council’s decision to suspend the public art program in 2017 and that’s something that will have to be addressed by council as the process moves forward. 

The panel will be made up of seven individuals, including city staff and official from another city with a similar program and an art consultant. 

Four of the panel members — two citizens at large and two arts professionals from Calgary — will be paid for their time and experience, between $2,000 and $4,000 for 50 hours of work selecting the organization through an request for proposal process.

The panel is expected to make a recommendation in December. 

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