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Amazon's social media team bares its teeth in Washington – Yahoo Canada Finance

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Refinery 29 UK

All I Want To Do Is Look At Ugly Food Photos

In late January, Olivia Jade made her much-anticipated return to YouTube following the 2019 college admissions scandal. I devoured the entirety of her first daily vlog within minutes of its drop but was left thinking about one single element specifically, long after the 15-minute video had ended. It wasn’t her mention of the Red Table Talk interview she’d done a month earlier. Nor was it her mint-green pyjama set — though I did covet it. No, instead, the image that wouldn’t leave my mind was the up-close shot of the most unsightly salad I have ever seen. According to Olivia Jade, the salad is something she orders a lot. Composed of lettuce, avocado, celery, and gnarled tendrils of pale, shredded chicken, the limp-looking salad was served with lemon-olive-oil dressing on the side. If I’d come across this green-and-grey salad in its brown biodegradable takeout container in real life, I likely wouldn’t have batted an eye. Yes, it would still have been undoubtedly ugly, but it would have just been any other salad. What do I care how it looks? Seeing it through my laptop screen, though, its appearance hit differently. Social media is a space that’s generally filled with highly curated, expertly edited images that display only the most glamorous depictions of people’s daily lives — so the fact that this very famous, hyper image-conscious, and much-followed vlogger shared an unstyled shot of sickly ribbons of chicken left me delighted. As someone who was deeply invested in the era of peak food-blogging in the mid- to late-aughts, I have, in the past, enjoyed many an artful photo of moist cake slices or runny-yolked eggs. Styling these images to pop on Tumblr or Instagram takes real, undeniable skill. But, it’s only recently that I’ve realised that I have moved beyond those specific visual pleasures. After nearly two decades as a social media user, I’ve grown tired of how images, specifically of food, are often presented — that is, perfectly. Now, when I see a photo of someone’s immaculate brunch spread, my mouth doesn’t immediately start watering; those stacks of fluffy French toast or dishes of crispy bacon strips just don’t inspire daydreams anymore. Instead, I’m distracted by the thought of more mundane things, like that one friend, holding their phone high up above the food, making everyone else wait to eat so that the syrup bottle can be positioned just-so. This isn’t a dig — on many occasions, I have been that person. And, trust me, I am not a traitor to my generation so I’m not saying there’s something wrong with putting the perfectly arranged food shot on Instagram, I just don’t get the same thrill out of it as I once did. The magic is gone. This makes sense. By now, most of us have seen numerous articles revealing the food styling secrets that go into making food look “good” in ads and even cookbooks. Glue is used in place of cereal milk, vaseline is smeared on the rim of a margarita glass to make it glisten, microwaved wet tampons are stuffed into a dish to create the illusion of steam. Once you know about these tricks, the food itself loses its appeal, because you’re reminded that aesthetics were prioritised over tasting good or even being edible. What’s the fun in that? What gets me going lately are snapshots of sloppy, thrown-together sandwiches on plates smeared with errant blobs of mayonnaise and crusty monochromatic casseroles still in the dish, sitting under atrocious lighting. These photos make me think about the actual food and not the background production that goes into making it look good. Whoever posted the picture simply wanted to share what they were cooking or eating as quickly as possible and then get down to the most important part: eating it. To my great pleasure, I’ve been seeing these types of food photos on social media more and more, and according to Jill Warren, content marketing specialist at Later, this step away from highly stylised images doesn’t only apply to food pics. “There’s been a major shift in the type of content people share on Instagram over the last few years, moving away from oversaturated, picture-perfect photos towards more authentic, barely edited, real-life content,” she explains. “This makes a lot of sense, especially when you consider how much Instagram has evolved. In the earlier days, it was a simple look-book for sharing filtered images — remember Clarendon? Now, the app has become a place for connection — whether it’s between brands and customers or influencers and their communities.” After a year of connecting almost exclusively through social media, this trend has become even more prominent. “Creators and brands who are willing to ‘lift the curtain’ and share their authentic selves benefit from a deeper, more meaningful relationship with their audience,” Warren says. “Arguably, being relatable is far more powerful than being ‘perfect’ in 2021.” When I see an unedited photo of food, placed however haphazardly onto a plate or still in its takeout container, I also see a genuine love for eating, something I have in common with the photo’s poster. I think, wow, I bet that tastes good, and am happy that the person got to enjoy whatever dish they shared. It feels like a pure exchange between two people, even if the interaction is virtual or one-sided. A few weeks after Olivia Jade returned to vlogging and implanted the hideous image of her favourite salad in my brain forever, she posted a “What I Eat In A Day” vlog. In this one, she ordered it again. “I had this in another blog, and everybody was saying it looked bland,” she shared unapologetically, as she removed the take-out container’s lid, and prepared to dive in. It was as if she were looking straight at her 1.86 million subscribers and saying, “Yes, I know this salad doesn’t look sexy, but I love it and I am going to continue to order it anyway.” If only she’d been as authentic on her college application, she could have gotten in anywhere. Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?What Are NFTs, & Why Are They Suddenly Everywhere?Most Important Viral Memes Of 2021 So FarGoodbye, Pandemic. Hello, Pandemic Nicknames.

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Media Advisory: Premier Furey, Minister Coady and Minister Haggie to Announce Mandatory Vaccination Policy – News Releases – Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

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The Honourable Andrew Furey, Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Honourable Siobhan Coady, Deputy Premier and President of Treasury Board, and the Honourable John Haggie, Minister of Health and Community Services, will announce the province’s mandatory vaccination policy today (Friday, October 15) at 1:00 p.m. at the Media Centre, East Block, Confederation Building.

The event will be live-streamed on the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Facebook and YouTube accounts. Media covering the announcement will have the opportunity to join in person in the media centre or by teleconference. Media planning to attend this event should register with Jillian Hood (jillianhood@gov.nl.ca) by 11:00 a.m.

Technical Briefing

Prior to the event, a technical briefing for media will be held at 12:00 p.m.

Media attending the briefing will have the opportunity to join in person in the media centre or by teleconference. Media who wish to participate in the technical briefing should RSVP to Jillian Hood (jillianhood@gov.nl.ca), who will provide the details and the required information.

Media must join the teleconference at 11:45 a.m. (NST) to be included on the call. For sound quality purposes, registered media are asked to use a land line if at all possible.

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Media contacts
Meghan McCabe
Office of the Premier
709-729-3960
meghanmccabe@gov.nl.ca

Victoria Barbour
Treasury Board Secretariat
709-729-4087
victoriabarbour@gov.nl.ca

Lesley Clarke
Health and Community Services
709-729-6986, 699-2910
lesleyclarke@gov.nl.ca

2021 10 15
9:11 am

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In 2022 Mobile Will Replace Direct Mail As The Top Local Media Advertising Platform – Forbes

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In yet another sign that marketers are allocating more of the ad budget to digital media. In 2022, BIA projects for the first time, in the local marketplace, more ad dollars will be allocated to mobile than any other medium including direct mail.

As the ad marketplace continues to recover post-pandemic, BIA forecasts local media ad spend to total $161.5 billion, a year-over-year increase of 10.1%. In 2022, BIA still expects more ad dollars will be spent on traditional media ($84.6billion) than will digital media ($76.8 billion). Although BIA forecasts local digital ad spend to exceed local traditional media in 2023. The digital duopoly of Google ($26.8 billion) and Facebook ($14.3 billion) is projected to account for slightly over half of all digital ad dollars spent locally next year. In addition, with mid-term elections set for November 2022, BIA expects $7.5 billion in total political ad spend. 

Next year local ad spend for mobile is expected to reach $34.0 billion, accounting for 21% of all ad dollars. Direct Mail, which had been the leader in local ad spend for many years, is expected to total $33.4 billion (20.7%) in ad spend. BIA ad spend forecast for PC/laptop is forecast at $27.5 billion (17.1%). Local advertisers are projected to allocate $21.0 billion in 2022 (13.0%) for television. Rounding out the top five will be local radio at $12.7 billion (7.9%).

When local television ad spend is broken out, BIA projects terrestrial TV to garner $19.3 billion in ad dollars next year and an additional $1.7 billion being allocated toward digital. Overall, local television ad revenue will have a strong year-over-year increase of 26.5%. Helping to drive the growth for local TV will be the political dollars. BIA estimates that local broadcast TV will total $3.4 billion next year in political ad dollars, making it the largest product category for the medium.

Similarly, for local radio, a large majority of ad dollars are expected to be allocated to over-the-air ($11.0 billion) with $1.7 billion going to digital. Radio, which doesn’t get the political ad dollars that television receives, will still benefit as more employees commute to and from work.

In a press release Rick Ducey, managing director of BIA Advisory Services, points to four reasons why mobile has surpassed direct mail and is expected to be the top advertising medium in 2022 and beyond:

·       COVID’s impact on consumer’s increased time spent with mobile and other digital media making digital the place to find and target consumers.

·       Digital’s overall momentum in winning more revenue share of media time from traditional media.

·       The rise of virtual consumer channels like delivery, curbside pickup and e-commerce in top categories like retail, restaurants, CPG where physical channels like retail store visits decline.

·       Greater consumer acceptance and use of virtual and e-commerce channels.

The growth in mobile ad spend has been driven by the change in media habits begun during the pandemic. eMarketer recently released a report that said mobile now accounts for one-third of all screen time every day. In 2021 daily time spent with mobile (non-voice) is expected to average 4 hours and 23 minutes, compared to 3 hours and 45 minutes in 2019. eMarketer expects mobile usage to increase by six minutes in both 2022 and 2023. In addition, time spent with mobile will account for over half (54.8%) of the nearly eight hours U.S. adults spend daily with digital media.

Within mobile, smartphone usage is the largest. The daily time spent with smartphones is expected to reach three hours and ten minutes in 2021, compared to 2 hours and 34 minutes in 2019. Smart phones usage now accounts for nearly one-quarter of total media time spent. Among the reasons cited for the leap in smartphone usage has been social media consumption led by TikTok, podcasting, gaming and shopping.

Among the results from Mary Meeker’s latest annual Internet Trends report is that mobile has become the first screen. Meeker also noted that nowadays three-quarters of web users regularly shop online with younger age groups more likely to use a mobile device for e-commerce.

Additionally, with the roll-out of the high-speed 5G, viewing to streaming video on mobile devices is expected to increase.

BIA expects mobile will continue to generate the most local ad dollars of any platform in the upcoming years.

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FSJ RCMP responds to social media post | Energeticcity.ca – Local news from Northeast BC – Energeticcity.ca

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Constable Chad Neustaeter, Media Relations Officer for Fort St. John RCMP, says it would be appropriate to describe what was actually occurring. He says this same individual has been arrested for Mischief, Loss of Enjoyment to Property after the property owner reported the individual for busking, panhandling and making customers feel uncomfortable in late September.

The business owner knew the man had a court condition not to attend the property, and knowing the individual was breaching conditions of his release, called police.

“In this instance, a new frontline police officer to Fort St John was given the opportunity to work through the investigation process and was conducting police checks to determine if there were in fact conditions and what those conditions were in order to make an educated decision that was in everyone’s best interest,” said Neustaeter.

The author of the social media post asked the question ‘what are we paying them for?’ Neustaeter says officers were conducting a full investigation on behalf of the complainant.

“During the investigation, the man was apologetic to police. The lead investigating officer exercised discretion and released the man who said he would leave. The business was updated accordingly and were satisfied with the actions of police.”

Neustaeter says there is often more than meets the eye of the public when it comes to policing.

“In this case, the public also did not get a chance to see the conclusion when the man walked away and the business owner was satisfied.”

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