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B.C. records 617 new cases of COVID-19 and 4 more deaths – CBC.ca

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B.C. health officials announced 617 new cases of COVID-19 and four more deaths on Thursday, the highest number of new cases since Jan. 7.

In a written statement, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix put the number of hospitalized patients at 224 people, 60 of whom are in intensive care.

A total of 1,321 people in B.C. have lost their lives due to COVID-19 since the pandemic began.

There are currently 4,348 active cases of coronavirus in the province, with public health monitoring 7,440 people across B.C. due to COVID-19 exposure. More than 69,602 people who tested positive have recovered.  

B.C. recorded two new outbreaks in health-care facilities — one at Mission Memorial Hospital and another at Fleetwood villa. An outbreak at Cariboo Memorial Hospital is now over.

A community outbreak has been reported at the Simon Fraser University Childcare Centre.

The number of people in critical care is at its lowest point since Nov. 24, and the province has seen seven deaths in the last 48 hours, the lowest two-day stretch since Nov. 15 and 16. 

Vaccination campaign

An additional 4,676 people received vaccination shots in one day, the highest number in a month, as the new supply of Pfizer vaccine became available. A total of 3,922 people received their second shot, the highest daily figure of the vaccination campaign. 

In total so far, 180,691 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine have been administered, with 29,952 of those being second doses.

 

“COVID-19 continues to challenge all of us, which is why taking care of our physical and mental well-being is so important — to get us through the difficult days and get to the brighter days ahead,” said Henry and Dix in the written statement.

Vancouver Coastal Health announced a new potential COVID-19 exposure at a West End bar on Thursday.

The health authority said anyone who was at the Hook Sea Bar at 1210 Denman Street Feb. 9-14 should self-monitor for symptoms of the disease, though the possible exposure is believed to be low risk.

On Wednesday, Dix said the province is expecting to receive 50,000 doses of the Pfizer vaccine this week, after it was delayed by a couple of days due to cold weather.

“We’ve delivered all of the immunizations really that we can in B.C. given the supply that’s been provided by the federal government,” said Dix, adding: “Hope is on the horizon.”

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Northern Health to open 30 COVID vaccine clinics for oldest residents, Indigenous seniors – Caledonia Courier

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Northern Health’s oldest residents, Indigenous seniors and elders will be able to book a COVID-19 vaccination starting on Monday (March 8) in 30 communities across the region.

The only people eligible to book appointments on Monday will be seniors aged 90 and up, Indigenous seniors aged 65 and up and Indigenous elders. There will be 30 clinics set up across 26 communities. Those wishing to sign up for a vaccine are asked to call only when their age bracket is eligible for a vaccine. Most clinics will use Pfizer vaccines, while a few will use the Modena vaccine.

Overall, Northern Health said it plans to vaccinate 15,000 people between March 15 and April 10 as part of the Phase Two effort. Vaccine clinics will operate at different times in different communities. To find out more, visit: https://www.northernhealth.ca/health-topics/covid-19-vaccine-plan.

To book, seniors, or someone calling on behalf of a senior, can call 1-844-255-7555 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. PT starting on Monday. Call centres will be open seven days a week. When calling, have the personal health number of the individual being vaccinated available. Be advised that staff will not ask for credit card information or payment.

Northern Health CEO Cathy Ulrich said that vaccine teams are already immunizing people who cannot travel to a clinic, and that callers will be asked if they can get to their clinic when they call. Northern Health will be keeping track of people who call in but miss their communities vaccine clinic dates and potentially return to that community later in Phase Two. People who miss Phase Two vaccinations in their own communities can travel to a neighbouring one or get vaccinated during Phase Three.


@katslepian

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48 COVID-19 vaccine clinics to open across Interior Health – Salmon Arm Observer – Salmon Arm Observer

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Forty-eight COVID-19 vaccine clinics will open across Interior Health (IH) in the coming weeks.

People aged 90 and over (those born before or in 1931), as well as Indigenous people over 65 (born in or before 1956) and elders, will be able to begin booking appointments Monday (March 8) through IH’s call centre at 1-877-740-7747. On March 15, that will open to people 85 and older (born in or before 1936) and on March 22, people over 80 (born in or before 1941) will be able to book their appointment to receive the first dose of the vaccine. The call centre will be open between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. every day.

After a person becomes eligible for the vaccine, they can book an appointment anytime. Eligible people looking to book an appointment can do so themselves or have another person book the appointment on their behalf.

Callers are asked to have on hand their legal name, date of birth, postal code, personal health number and current contact information, including a regularly-checked email address for booking confirmation.

READ MORE: Canada’s chief of public health hopeful as Health Canada approves 4th vaccine

READ MORE: Second COVID-19 outbreak declared at Kelowna General Hospital

The 48 clinics, located across the health authority’s widespread geographical boundaries, are set to open as soon as March 15 and deployment will be adapted as the vaccine rollout continues. A full list of clinics is available on IH’s website.

“The list you see today will be adjusted according to need,” said Karen Bloemink, IH’s vice president of pandemic response, during a press conference on Sunday (March 7).

To prepare for anticipated high call volumes, IH is asking people to stick to the outlined schedule to prevent a system overload. The health authority reassured there will be enough supply for all who want to be vaccinated.

“We would like to assure everyone that they will not miss their chance to get a vaccine if they want to get a vaccine,” said Bloemink.

IH will contact individuals when their second dose is due, after about four months, allowing them to make another appointment.

While IH expects the majority of individuals to come to clinics, it is working with known clients who need accommodations due to mobility issues. Those plans could involve home visits if required.

Despite the concerns of many regarding vaccine efficacy rates, recipients will not be able to choose which vaccine they get.

The majority of clinics will be offering the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines, which medical health officer Dr. Albert de Villiers said have comparable efficacy. The AstraZeneca vaccine will be reserved for younger people, and the use of the recently approved Johnson & Johnson vaccine is still to be determined within IH.

Those who are vaccinated in the next few weeks will still need to follow currently in-place health orders. De Villiers said in the coming months, he hopes visitation can increase.

“At this stage, the provincial health officer’s orders are still in place,” de Villiers said. “Even if you’ve got your vaccine, you should still follow all those orders.”

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email: michael.rodriguez@kelownacapnews.com


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Health authority opening 19 clinics to immunize Vancouver Island residents – Port Alberni Valley News – Alberni Valley News

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Thousands more seniors are set to receive their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine over the coming month at 19 clinics on Vancouver Island.

Island Health announced today, March 7, more details of its regional plan to support the next phase of B.C.’s immunization program.

The health authority identified the locations of 19 community clinics from Sooke to Port Hardy. The list of clinic locations can be found at this link.

Half a dozen clinics on the Island are classified as “mass” clinics able to accommodate 15-20 people at a time, with up to 12 immunizations per station per hour, said Victoria Schmid, Island Health’s vice-president of pandemic planning, during a press conference. Mass clinics will be located at Parksville Community Centre, Beban Park in Nanaimo, the Cowichan Community Centre gym in Duncan, Eagle Ridge Arena in Langford, the Archie Browing Sports Centre in Esquimalt and the University of Victoria’s McKinnon Gym.

Registration starts Monday, March 8, for non-Indigenous people age 90 and over and Indigenous elders 65 and over, and vaccine appointments will begin March 15. To make an appointment, an eligible person or someone calling on their behalf should call 1-833-348-4787 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., seven days a week.

Call centre operators will ask for legal name, date of birth, postal code, personal health number, phone number and an e-mail address.

Individuals 85 and over can start calling March 15 to make appointments for the week starting March 22. Island Health hopes to have all elderly seniors aged 80-plus immunized by April 12.

“The more we can do to make this a successful launch, the quicker we can get through populations and the quicker we’re back to having beers on the patio over the summer,” Schmid said.

She said Island Health anticipates having “more than enough supply” of vaccine doses and is expecting to receive close to 25,000 doses per week by the end of this month.

“We will just continue to see more and more supply in this phase, which is such a good news story for our population,” she said.

Island Health, in the release, said the opening of the community clinics will “continue to build on a successful vaccination program” that has delivered more than 60,000 doses so far to seniors in long-term care and assisted living, health-care workers and members of First Nations communities.

Island Health said its teams have “done a lot of planning and have prepared for a number of contingencies, and appreciate patience and the “continued kindness” that has been shown to health-care workers.

“This is the largest immunization rollout any of us has experienced, and it will not be without challenges,” the release concluded. “We will get through those challenges together, as we move closer to a time when we can be together with our loved ones and friends once again.”

There are about 30 small and remote communities on Vancouver Island that do not have immunization clinics among the 19 locations on the list. Residents in those communities “will be vaccinated in a whole-of-community approach,” the health authority said, which may involve one- or two-day immunization clinics.

READ ALSO: Vaccines coming, B.C. seniors need to be ready, premier says

READ ALSO: Dr. Bonnie Henry predicts a ‘post-pandemic world’ for B.C. this summer

READ ALSO: Stay informed about COVID-19



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