Connect with us

Science

Boeing Starliner is the first US-made crew capsule to land on the ground – Engadget

Published

on


Sponsored Links


NASA/Bill Ingalls

The inaugural Starliner test flight didn’t go according to plan, but it still made a little bit of history. Boeing’s spacecraft landed safely at New Mexico’s White Sands Missile Range at 7:58AM Eastern, making it the first US-made, crew-ready capsule to touch down on solid ground. Previous capsules from the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo programs all landed in the sea. This capsule didn’t have any humans aboard (the test dummy Rosie doesn’t count), but this is still a watershed moment.

Starliner didn’t dock with the International Space Station as planned, but it still collected ample amounts of data across the flight, including Rosie’s insights as to how humans would fare during a trip. The team likely collected about 85 to 90 percent of what they were looking for, Boeing’s Jim Chilton said during a post-touchdown briefing. The mission team previously said it was confident it could fix the mistake that prevented the docking.

Just what happens next is uncertain. Boeing and NASA said during the briefing that they still expected a crewed flight in 2020, but that they wanted to review data before deciding the next course of action. There are still more dry runs to go, including an in-flight abort test to complement the launch abort test from November. While NASA is eager to reduce its dependence on Russian spacecraft to transport astronauts, it also wants to ensure that vehicles like Starliner and SpaceX’s Crew Dragon are trustworthy before there are people aboard.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Comment



Comments

Share
331
Shares

Share

Tweet

Share

Save

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Science

Park City Men's Shed weathers storm – Winnipeg Free Press

Published

on



With no end in sight for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Park City Men’s Shed is doing what it can to keep its doors open.

After shutting down in March in light of the pandemic, the Park City Men’s Shed group began meeting again in late June. 

“We’ve been able to open things up on a limited basis,” explained organizer Fred Bobrowski. “With winter coming up, there aren’t many outdoor activities. So coming to visit and socializing, that’s big.”

Bobrowski got involved in Men’s Shed after hearing a presentation that Doug Mackie, chair of the Canadian Men’s Shed Association, made to the Transcona Council for Seniors. Park City Men’s Shed has been meeting at the Elmwood/EK Active Living Centre (180 Poplar Ave.) now for over two years. The group now meets Mondays and Wednesdays from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Membership in the group costs $35, $20 of which pays for a membership in the Elmwood/EK Active Living Centre, which offers a number of other programs throughout the week. 

“Guys come and do their own thing,” Bobrowski said. “A lot of guys do walking sticks or canes. Some are still doing cottonwood carving. Some guys are making some good sized Christmas table ornaments. Stuff like that. We hope to get some guys in who can provide some instruction.”

The group has moved from the back room where members worked closely together, chatting or taking a break from projects to play crib, to the larger front room of the Active Living Centre. 

“It may be a while before we can do that again, the way things are going,” Bobrowski admitted. “But mostly, the guys come to have a coffee, visit, socialize and have some quiet time to work. It’s not complicated, that’s the beauty.”

While operating with a limited capacity, the space provides plenty of room for members to work on their projects.

“We practise social distancing,” Bobrowski said. “Some guys feel more comfortable with a mask, some don’t, so they make sure they social distance. There’s lots of room. We do whatever it takes.”

Maurice Williamson, an East Kildonan resident, joined the group a couple of years ago. Taking a break from carving walking sticks, he said he enjoys coming out to the group each week, when he can.

Phil Veness, another EK resident, was attending his first meeting on Sept. 21 after hearing about Men’s Shed on the radio. 

“I was looking for something to do,” he said. “Thought I’d try it out.” 

While the woodworking projects are what anchors the group, it’s the fellowship that keeps members coming back each week. The social isolation that resulted during the lockdown in response to the COVID-19 reinforced how important the group is to many members.

“The guys were eager to meet,” Bobrowski said. “It’s good to see them all again.”

However, Bobrowski added that there are a number of members who aren’t comfortable meeting up again just yet.

“It’s just not for them until things are a little safer,” he said.

The Park City Men’s Shed are hosting a tool sale on Sat., Oct. 3.

“If people want some half-decent tools at a good price, we’re here,” Bobrowski said.

The sale, which takes place at 180 Poplar Ave. from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and also includes garden tools, acts as a fundraiser for the group. 

“It helps pay for our costs, wood and stuff like that,” Bobrowski added.

With no end in sight for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Park City Men’s Shed is doing what it can to keep its doors open.

After shutting down in March in light of the pandemic, the Park City Men’s Shed group began meeting again in late June. 

“We’ve been able to open things up on a limited basis,” explained organizer Fred Bobrowski. “With winter coming up, there aren’t many outdoor activities. So coming to visit and socializing, that’s big.”

Bobrowski got involved in Men’s Shed after hearing a presentation that Doug Mackie, chair of the Canadian Men’s Shed Association, made to the Transcona Council for Seniors. Park City Men’s Shed has been meeting at the Elmwood/EK Active Living Centre (180 Poplar Ave.) now for over two years. The group now meets Mondays and Wednesdays from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Membership in the group costs $35, $20 of which pays for a membership in the Elmwood/EK Active Living Centre, which offers a number of other programs throughout the week. 

“Guys come and do their own thing,” Bobrowski said. “A lot of guys do walking sticks or canes. Some are still doing cottonwood carving. Some guys are making some good sized Christmas table ornaments. Stuff like that. We hope to get some guys in who can provide some instruction.”

The group has moved from the back room where members worked closely together, chatting or taking a break from projects to play crib, to the larger front room of the Active Living Centre. 

“It may be a while before we can do that again, the way things are going,” Bobrowski admitted. “But mostly, the guys come to have a coffee, visit, socialize and have some quiet time to work. It’s not complicated, that’s the beauty.”

While operating with a limited capacity, the space provides plenty of room for members to work on their projects.

“We practise social distancing,” Bobrowski said. “Some guys feel more comfortable with a mask, some don’t, so they make sure they social distance. There’s lots of room. We do whatever it takes.”

Maurice Williamson, an East Kildonan resident, joined the group a couple of years ago. Taking a break from carving walking sticks, he said he enjoys coming out to the group each week, when he can.

Phil Veness, another EK resident, was attending his first meeting on Sept. 21 after hearing about Men’s Shed on the radio. 

“I was looking for something to do,” he said. “Thought I’d try it out.” 

While the woodworking projects are what anchors the group, it’s the fellowship that keeps members coming back each week. The social isolation that resulted during the lockdown in response to the COVID-19 reinforced how important the group is to many members.

“The guys were eager to meet,” Bobrowski said. “It’s good to see them all again.”

However, Bobrowski added that there are a number of members who aren’t comfortable meeting up again just yet.

“It’s just not for them until things are a little safer,” he said.

The Park City Men’s Shed are hosting a tool sale on Sat., Oct. 3.

“If people want some half-decent tools at a good price, we’re here,” Bobrowski said.

The sale, which takes place at 180 Poplar Ave. from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and also includes garden tools, acts as a fundraiser for the group. 

“It helps pay for our costs, wood and stuff like that,” Bobrowski added.

Sheldon Birnie
Community journalist — The Herald

Sheldon Birnie is the community journalist for The Herald
Email him at sheldon.birnie@canstarnews.com
Call him at 204-697-7112

Read full biography

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Science

Radiation levels on Moon 2.6 times greater than ISS: study – FRANCE 24

Published

on


Issued on: 25/09/2020 – 20:54Modified: 25/09/2020 – 20:52

Advertising

Washington (AFP)

As the US prepares to return humans to the Moon this decade, one of the biggest dangers future astronauts will face is space radiation that can cause lasting health effects, from cataracts to cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

Though the Apollo missions of the 1960s and 1970s proved it was safe for people to spend a few days on the lunar surface, NASA did not take daily radiation measurements that would help scientists quantify just how long crews could stay.

This question was resolved Friday after a Chinese-German team published in the journal Science Advances the results of an experiment carried out by China’s Chang’E 4 lander in 2019.

“The radiation of the Moon is between two and three times higher than what you have on the ISS (International Space Station),” co-author Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber, an astrophysicist at the University of Kiel told AFP.

“So that limits your stay to approximately two months on the surface of the Moon,” he added, once the radiation exposure from the roughly week-long journey there, and week back, is taken into account.

There are several sources of radiation exposure: galactic cosmic rays, sporadic solar particle events (for example from solar flares), and neutrons and gamma rays from interactions between space radiation and the lunar soil.

Radiation is measured using the unit sievert, which quantifies the amount absorbed by human tissues.

The team found that the radiation exposure on the Moon is 1,369 microsieverts per day — about 2.6 times higher than the International Space Station crew’s daily dose.

The reason for this is that the ISS is still partly shielded by the Earth’s protective magnetic bubble, called the magnetosphere, which deflects most radiation from space.

Earth’s atmosphere provides additional protection for humans on the surface, but we are more exposed the higher up we go.

“The radiation levels we measured on the Moon are about 200 times higher than on the surface of the Earth and five to 10 times higher than on a flight from New York to Frankfurt,” added Wimmer-Schweingruber.

NASA is planning to bring humans to the Moon by 2024 under the Artemis mission and has said it has plans for a long term presence that would include astronauts working and living on the surface.

For Wimmer-Schweingruber there is one work-around if we want humans to spend more than two or three months: build habitats that are shielded from radiation by coating them with 80 centimeters (30 inches) of lunar soil.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Science

Radiation levels on Moon 2.6 times greater than ISS: study – RFI

Published

on


Issued on: 25/09/2020 – 20:52

Advertising

Washington (AFP)

As the US prepares to return humans to the Moon this decade, one of the biggest dangers future astronauts will face is space radiation that can cause lasting health effects, from cataracts to cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

Though the Apollo missions of the 1960s and 1970s proved it was safe for people to spend a few days on the lunar surface, NASA did not take daily radiation measurements that would help scientists quantify just how long crews could stay.

This question was resolved Friday after a Chinese-German team published in the journal Science Advances the results of an experiment carried out by China’s Chang’E 4 lander in 2019.

“The radiation of the Moon is between two and three times higher than what you have on the ISS (International Space Station),” co-author Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber, an astrophysicist at the University of Kiel told AFP.

“So that limits your stay to approximately two months on the surface of the Moon,” he added, once the radiation exposure from the roughly week-long journey there, and week back, is taken into account.

There are several sources of radiation exposure: galactic cosmic rays, sporadic solar particle events (for example from solar flares), and neutrons and gamma rays from interactions between space radiation and the lunar soil.

Radiation is measured using the unit sievert, which quantifies the amount absorbed by human tissues.

The team found that the radiation exposure on the Moon is 1,369 microsieverts per day — about 2.6 times higher than the International Space Station crew’s daily dose.

The reason for this is that the ISS is still partly shielded by the Earth’s protective magnetic bubble, called the magnetosphere, which deflects most radiation from space.

Earth’s atmosphere provides additional protection for humans on the surface, but we are more exposed the higher up we go.

“The radiation levels we measured on the Moon are about 200 times higher than on the surface of the Earth and five to 10 times higher than on a flight from New York to Frankfurt,” added Wimmer-Schweingruber.

NASA is planning to bring humans to the Moon by 2024 under the Artemis mission and has said it has plans for a long term presence that would include astronauts working and living on the surface.

For Wimmer-Schweingruber there is one work-around if we want humans to spend more than two or three months: build habitats that are shielded from radiation by coating them with 80 centimeters (30 inches) of lunar soil.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending